Inspect-A-House, LLC

Website: http://www.reporthost.com/inspect-a-house
Company email: inspectahouse@nctv.com
Inspector's email: danielboone@nctv.com
Phone: (864) 639-1320 · (864) 506-1054

 

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Tommy Mills
Property address: 117 Brookwood Drive
Seneca,SC
Inspection date: 3/16/2010
This report published on Wednesday, March 17, 2010 11:05:11 PM EDT

View summary page

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 1750
Inspector: Dan Boone
Structures inspected: House
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 35
Time started: 4:45 PM
Time finished: 6:30 PM
Inspection Fee: 250.00
Payment method: Invoiced
Present during inspection: Realtor(s)
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Damp
Front of structure faces: West
Main entrance faces: West
Foundation type: Unfinished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Masonry
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Brick
Driveway material: Asphalt
1) One or more outdoor electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all outdoor receptacles within six feet six inches of ground level have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

Photo 22  
 

2) Crack in between carport and house could cause water to enter basement.

Photo 17  

Photo 18  

3) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

Photo 2  
 

4) Broken window pane in basement

Photo 6  
 
 
Roof Return to table of contents
Roof inspection method: Traversed, Viewed from ground with binoculars
Roof type: Gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Estimated age of roof: 25 years
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Adequate
5) The fascia boards on the back of the house show signs of rot.
Would recommend having a qualified roofer inspect the roof.

Photo 15  

Photo 16  

6) The roof is showing signs of age and has several raised shingles.

Photo 3  
Several raised shingles.
 
 
Attic Return to table of contents
Inspection method: Traversed
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Not visible
Insulation material: Mineral wool loose fill
Insulation depth: 6-8 inches
 
Electric service Return to table of contents
Primary service type: Overhead
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 60
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: Basement
Service entrance conductor material: Copper
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
Smoke detectors present: Yes
7) The service drop wires are less than 8 feet above the carport. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician and/or the utility company should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Photo 21  
 

8) The house was built with a 60 amp electrical service. This is inadequate
now for a home with A/C, electric range,dishwasher, microwave, and
refrigerator. I would recommend a licensed electrician upgrade the
electrical service. This could also be safety issue.

The breaker panel does not contain a main breaker and the service wire enters through the block wall with out a sleeve or conduit. This is also a safety issue.

Photo 4  
60 amp service

Photo 14  
Unprotected entrance cable.
No main breaker.
 
Water heater Return to table of contents
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Manufacturer: State
9) The temperature-pressure relief valve is not piped down to the floor. This is a safety hazard due to possible burns.

Photo 12  
 

10) The pilot light was not lit so unable to test the water heater.
 
Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
Estimated age: 18 years
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
Manufacturer: Rheem
Model: 2 1/2 ton
Filter location: At the base of the furnace
11) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

Photo 13  
 

12) The estimated useful life for air conditioning compressors is 8 to 15 years. This unit appears to have exceeded this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

Photo 5  
 
 
Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
Location of main water shut-off valve: Basement wall
Location of main water meter: Front Yard
Location of main fuel shut-off: Right end of house
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Galvanized steel
Supply pipe material: Copper
Drain pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
13) Copper water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:

  • Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than six hours.
  • Install appropriate filters at points of use.
  • Use only cold water for cooking and drinking. Hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water.
  • Use bottled or distilled water.
  • Treat well water to make it less corrosive.
  • Have a qualified plumbing contractor replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components as necessary.

    For more information visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html
    http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    14) Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed in one or more areas so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.

    Photo 20  
     

    15) Water is leaking from the commoode tank in the basement half bath.

    Photo 19  
    Water leaking from tank bolts.

    Photo 11  
    Water stains from leaking commode.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    16) One or more open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

    Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and the presence of 2-pronged receptacles in some areas of this structure, an acceptable repair may be to simply replace the ungrounded 3-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.
    17) Ground fault recepticals need to be near sink.

    Photo 8  
    No ground fault protection.
     

    18) Need clamps on diswasher drain under the sink.

    Photo 7  
     
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    19) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 9  
    No ground fault protection.
     

    20) Bathtub drain needs to be adjusted .Tub drains slow, have to hold handle down for water to drain from tub.

    Photo 10  
     

     
    At the time of inspection the stucture of the home was very good, however, there are a few concerns.
    The roof has need of repair and or possible replacement. The electrical service and house wiring may or should be upgraded for safety and convenience.