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Website: http://www.getaninspection.com
Email: office@watchdogsutah.com
Inspector's email: mike@watchdogsutah.com
Phone: (801) 580-5551
Inspector's phone: (801) 580-5551
Inspector: Michael Stanford NACHI Cert. #06040290

 

Home Inspection Report

Client(s):  Bob Smith
Property address:  8525 Happy Ln.
Anytown, USA
Inspection date:  Friday, August 01, 2014

This report published on Thursday, August 21, 2014 9:10:50 AM MDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited. This report is conducted in accordance with NACHI guidelines and standards of practice. This report does not include inspections for Wood destroying insects or vermin, Molds, Narcotics, Radon, Lead Paint, Asbestos or other Hazardous Materials.

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How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a risk of injury. In extreme or unusual cases, may pose a risk of death.
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeFHA ConcernThis item may be required to be repaired as a condition for an FHA Loan

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Basement
Kitchen
Interior rooms
Bathrooms
Attic


General information
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Report number: SE082014A
Structures inspected: House & Garage
Type of building: Manufactured home
Age of building: 1986
Time started: 8:00 am
Time finished: 10:30 am
Inspection Fee: $295.00
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Partly cloudy
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Damp
Front of structure faces: West
Main entrance faces: West
Foundation type: Finished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Irrigation system
1) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no or too few properly installed carbon monoxide alarms are visible. Carbon monoxide is a heavy gas and detectors should be mounted near floor level on each level of the home. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
Exterior
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Footing material: Not visible
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Stucco
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core steel
2) The deck appears to have been constructed in a substandard manner or has deteriorated. For example, sagging, improper fasteners, hangers, brackets, bracing etc. Recommend a qualified contractor evaluate and make repairs as needed.
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Photo 2-1
East side of home
 

3) Handrail(s) at some stairs are loose. This is a safety hazard. Make repairs as necessary. For example, installing new fasteners and/or hardware so handrails are securely attached.
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Photo 3-1
South side of home
 

4) This property has one or more deep window wells. This is a safety concern as small children can fall into the well and injure themselves. Recommend installing well coverings.
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Photo 4-1
West side of home
 

5) Cracks and staining was found in one or more areas of the stucco siding. This can be an indication that water is penetrating behind the siding. This is a condition conducive wood destroying insects and microbial growths and can cause damage to the structure over time. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace stucco siding as necessary.
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Photo 5-1
West side of home
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Photo 5-2
East side of home

6) Stains were found in one or more areas on soffit boards. These appear to be due to a lack of gutters (dripping water, high moisture content, etc.). A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. Roof repairs may be necessary, such as to the roof surface and/or flashing. Drip edge flashing may need to be replaced or installed.
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Photo 6-1
West side of home
 

7) The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas or does not slope away from the structure. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.
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Photo 7-1
West side of home
 

8) One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.
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Photo 8-1
South side of home
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Photo 8-2
East side of home

9) One or more gutters are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Gutters and downspouts should be installed where missing. Also, extensions such as splashblocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines should be installed as necessary to carry rain water away from the house.
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Photo 9-1
West side of home
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Photo 9-2
South side of home
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Photo 9-3
East side of home
 

10) One or more gutters were leaking during the inspection. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Replace or repair gutters where necessary.
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Photo 10-1
West side of home
 

11) One or more wooden deck members are in contact with soil. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. However no damage from wood destroying insects or organisms was found. Standard building practices require that there be at least 6" of space between any wood and the soil below, even if the wood is treated. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. Otherwise recommend installing borate based Impel rods to prevent rot.
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Photo 11-1
East side of home
 

12) One or more exhaust duct end caps are damaged and/or deteriorated. Their purpose is to prevent unconditioned air from entering the house, and keep out birds, rodents and bugs. Blocked ducts can cause fan motors and/or clothes dryers to overheat and may pose a fire hazard. New vent cap(s) should be installed where necessary.
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Photo 12-1
West side of home
 

13) Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as holes and those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed with silicon, window caulk or like material as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.
14) Composite decking is deteriorated in some areas. Repair or replace as needed.
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Photo 14-1
East side of home
 

15) Significant rot was found in support posts, bracing at one or more structures covering decks, patios and/or porches. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.
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Photo 15-1
South side of home
 

16) The painted exterior finish in some areas is failing. These areas should be prepped (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repainted as needed and as per standard building practices.
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Photo 16-1
East side of home
 

Roof
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Roof inspection method: Traversed
Roof type: Gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Estimated age of roof: 2-7 yrs
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Unable to determine (no access to attic spaces)
17) One or more plumbing vent pipes terminate less than six inches above the roof surface below. Debris or snow may block openings, and may result in sewer gases entering living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so vent pipes terminate at least six inches above roof surfaces.
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Photo 17-1
Roof
 

18) Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Some damage has occurred. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.
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Photo 18-1
Roof
 

19) One or more composition shingles are damaged, deteriorated and/or missing or are installed in a substandard manner, and should be repaired or replaced. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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Photo 19-1
Roof
 

20) Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.
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Photo 20-1
Roof
 

Garage
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21) There is no automatic opener installed on the vehicle door.
22)   Stains and/or water damage was found in one or more ceiling and/or wall areas. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found. The stain(s) or damage may be due to past roof and/or plumbing leaks. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this, and monitoring the area(s) in the future, especially after heavy or prolonged rain. If elevated moisture is found in the future, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 22-1
Garage
 

Electric service
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Primary service type: Underground
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 100
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: North side of home
Location of sub panels: Basement
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil, Cold water supply pipes
Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed, Copper, Aluminum multi-strand
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: Can't verify
Smoke detectors present: Yes
NAC 645D.520 Switches, receptacles and fixtures: Inspected
NAC 645D.520 Main panel and sub panels: Inspected
NAC 264D.520 Wiring and junction boxes: Inspected
23) One or more overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses), neutral terminations and/or lugs are "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire. This is a safety hazard since the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks and fires may result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

For more information visit. http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_are_two_black_wires_attached_to_a_single_breaker_lug_called
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Photo 23-1
Bedroom
 

24) One or more open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found.

Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by a qualified electrician to repair the circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices. Replacement of three-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles is not an acceptable solution.
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Photo 24-1
Interior
Photo
Photo 24-2
Bedroom

25) One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box or install light fixture or other device.
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Photo 25-1
Basement kitchen
 

26) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
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Photo 26-1
Garage
 

27) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink or serve the exterior or garage appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed. Note: GFCI receptacles were not introduced until 1971. They began to be required in bathrooms in 1975 and in kitchens in 1987.
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Photo 27-1
East side of home
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Photo 27-2
Garage

28) The light fixture in one or more rooms, hallways or stairs is controlled by a single switch at one end or entry or inoperable 3-way switches (for example, only the switch that turns out the light can turn it back on). This is a safety hazard due to inadequate lighting. The light should be controlled by functioning three-way switches near each entry. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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Photo 28-1
Basement hallway
 

29) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates or fixtures should be installed where missing.
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Photo 29-1
Garage
 

Water heater
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Estimated age: 13 yrs
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Water heater operational at time of inspection: Yes
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Manufacturer: Hotpoint
30) The water heater does not have seismic straps or struts installed. This is a potential safety hazard since movement can cause leaks in the gas supply lines or damage wiring. Leaks may also occur in water supply pipes. Install seismic straps or struts as necessary and as per standard building practices.
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Photo 30-1
Mechanical area
 

31) The drain line to the water heater's temperature-pressure relief valve terminates less than 6 inches from the floor. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of explosion. A drain line that terminates less than 6 inches from the floor can result in the water heater exploding if or when the valve opens due to restricted venting. The drain line should be modified, and by a qualified contractor if necessary, so it terminates 6" from the floor.
32) Corrosion was found in one or more areas on the water heater. The water heater may be beginning to fail. A qualified plumbing contractor should evaluate and replace or repair water heater if necessary.
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Photo 32-1
Mechanical area
 

33) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. The clients should be aware that this water heater may be near, at, or beyond its useful life and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement if necessary.
Heating and cooling
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; solar, coal or wood-fired heat systems; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating or cooling system components, does not determine if heating or cooling systems are appropriately sized, does not test coolant pressure, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, a shut-off valve to be operated, a circuit breaker to be turned "on" or a serviceman's or oil emergency switch to be operated. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks. Condensation pans and drain lines may clog or leak at any time and should be monitored while in operation in the future. Where buildings contain furnishings or stored items, the inspector may not be able to verify that a heat source is present in all "liveable" rooms (e.g. bedrooms, kitchens and living/dining rooms).
Estimated age: 28 yrs
Furnace operational at time of inspection: Yes
Evaporative Cooler Operational at Time of Inspection: No
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air, Down draft, Standard efficiency
Primary Air conditioning type: Evaporative cooler
Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
Manufacturer: Coleman
Filter location: Front panel of furnace
Last service date: Unknown
34) Because of the age and/or condition of this furnace, recommend that a qualified heating and cooling technician inspect the heat exchanger and perform a Carbon Monoxide test when it's serviced.
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Photo 34-1
Mechanical area
 

35) The evaporative cooler is deteriorated. The water pump is not functioning. Recommend a qualified professional evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 35-1
Roof
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Photo 35-2
Roof, Interior of evaporative cooler

36) The last service date of this system appears to be more than two years ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than two years ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, green sticker if needed, service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed every few years in the future, or as per the contractor's recommendations.
37) Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.
Plumbing and laundry
Return to table of contents

Water pressure (psi): 100
Location of main water shut-off valve: West side of basement
Location of main water meter: Street
Location of main fuel shut-off: West side of home
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Galvanized steel
Supply pipe material: Copper, Galvanized steel, Polybutylene
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Not visible
38) The clothes dryer exhaust duct appears to need cleaning. Significant amounts of lint build up was found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire from decreased air flow. This duct should be cleaned now and annually, or more often if necessary in the future. Some chimney sweeps or heating/cooling duct cleaners perform this service. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html or http://chimneykeepers.com/dryerclean.html
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Photo 38-1
West side of home
 

39) No expansion tank is installed on this structure's water supply system. Expansion tanks are recommended when a property is on a public water supply system and the property's water system is "closed" via a pressure reducing valve (PRV), check valve, or backflow preventer. No room for expansion of water exists in this type of system. Thermal expansion occurs when water is heated during non-use periods. In a closed system with no provision for expansion, its effects may include:

Expansion tanks can eliminate these problems by giving water a place to go when thermal expansion occurs. When a water heating cycle ends, or when any fixture is opened within the system, the impact of thermal expansion is reduced, and water drains out of the expansion tank back into the system. Recommend having a qualified plumber install an expansion tank as per standard building practices.
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Photo 39-1
Mechanical area
 

40) One or more leaks were found in water supply valves. A qualified plumber should repair as necessary.
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Photo 40-1
East side of home
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Photo 40-2
Upstairs laundry area

41) Plumbing supply lines appear to be made of Polybutylene. Polybutylene is a plastic material used extensively during the 1980s and 1990s that has proven to be more prone to leakage than other types of supply piping systems like copper. A home inspection cannot determine if polybutylene pipes are about to leak simply by looking at the outside of them. Pipes deteriorate from the inside and can split under pressure. They can leak anytime without warning destroying furniture, family heirlooms, and even causing structural damage. Leaks can go unnoticed and lead to mold. Recommend reviewing any disclosure statements if available for comments on leaks in the water supply system.

A class action lawsuit has been filed regarding this material that requires the manufacturers to cover piping systems installed between Jan. 1, 1978 through July 31, 1995. For more information on the class action lawsuit, visit http://www.pbpipe.com/index1.htm , or call the Plumbing Claims Group at (800) 356-3496 for more information.
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Photo 41-1
Mechanical area
 

42) Stains were found in one or more sections of drain and/or waste pipes. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future, and if leaks are found, have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair as necessary. Alternatively, the client(s) may wish to have a qualified plumber evaluate now and repair if necessary.
Photo
Photo 42-1
Basement, Under main floor bathroom
 

Basement
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Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
Pier or support post material: Bearing wall
Floor structure above: Steel
Kitchen
Return to table of contents

Dishwasher operational: Yes
Refrigerator operational: Yes
Range hood operational: None
Microwave operational: None
Range,Oven,Cooktop operational: Yes
Food disposal operational: No
43) Substandard wiring was found for the under-sink food disposal. For example, unprotected solid-strand, non-metallic sheathed (Romex) wiring is used, open junction boxes, wire splices not in boxes etc. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 43-1
Basement kitchen
 

44) The rubber safety flap at garbage disposer entrance is missing and/or damaged. This device helps protect the user from items flying out of the disposer during operation. Recommend replacing flap.
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Photo 44-1
Basement kitchen
 

45) A suspicious microbial-growth was observed on floors, walls and/or ceilings. Typically these types of growths exist in moist areas where a food source such as wood or drywall is present. When the source of the moisture is removed these bio-growths cease to grow and can be eliminated through remediation. The EPA has determined that small areas (less than 10 square feet) can be cleaned by the homeowner using products such as Dow Scrubbing Bubbles or similar cleansers. Larger areas should be remediated by a professional. For more information visit www.epa.gov/iaq/molds
Photo
Photo 45-1
Basement kitchen
 

46) The under-sink food disposal is inoperable. A qualified plumber or contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the food disposal as necessary.
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Photo 46-1
Basement kitchen
 

47) One or more toilets, tubs, sink drains or water supply lines have an active leak. For example, at pipe fittings and/or junctions between pipe and sink. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 47-1
Basement kitchen
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Photo 47-2
Kitchen

48) One or more cabinets, drawer, doors, hinges, shelving are damaged and/or deteriorated. Repair or replace components as necessary.
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Photo 48-1
Kitchen
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Photo 48-2
Kitchen

49) Countertops are damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. Evaluate and repair or replace countertops as necessary.
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Photo 49-1
Kitchen
 

50) The bracket that attaches the dishwasher to the underside of the countertop is loose, missing or installed in a substandard way. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or reinstalling the bracket.
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Photo 50-1
Kitchen
 

51) One or more counter tops are not securely fastened to the base below. Recommend installing anchors as needed to secure the countertop.
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Photo 51-1
Kitchen
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Photo 51-2
Kitchen

52) One or more faucet aerators are missing. Recommend cleaning or replacing aerators for better water flow.
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Photo 52-1
Kitchen
 

53)   All of the appliances in the kitchen were operated during the inspection and were found to be in working order unless noted above. The client should be aware that appliances are mechanical in nature and are prone to failure. This inspection is not a guarantee that the appliances will still be operable after taking occupancy.
Interior rooms
Return to table of contents


54) Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 10 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit this article: NFPA urges replacing home smoke alarms after 10 years.
55) Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.
56) Glass in one or more windows is broken. A qualified contractor should replace glass where necessary.
Photo
Photo 56-1
Basement, East facing
Photo
Photo 56-2
Basement, North end, East facing

57) One or more interior doors, casings or trim are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced as necessary.
Photo
Photo 57-1
Basement bedroom
 

58) One or more doors will not latch when closed. Repairs should be made as necessary. For example, aligning strike plates with latch bolts and/or replacing locksets.
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Photo 58-1
Interior
 

59) One or more windows are deteriorated. Recommend making repairs as needed.
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Photo 59-1
Bathroom
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Photo 59-2
Bathroom
Photo
Photo 59-3
Basement, Multiple windows in home
 

Bathrooms
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Bathtub(s) and shower(s) operational at time of inspection: Yes
Sinks and faucets operational at time of inspection: Yes
Toilet(s) operational at time of inspection: Yes
Jetted tub operational at time of inspection: None
60) A suspicious microbial-growth was observed on floors, walls and/or ceilings. Typically these types of growths exist in moist areas where a food source such as wood or drywall is present. When the source of the moisture is removed these bio-growths cease to grow and can be eliminated through remediation. The EPA has determined that small areas (less than 10 square feet) can be cleaned by the homeowner using products such as Dow Scrubbing Bubbles or similar cleansers. Larger areas should be remediated by a professional. For more information visit www.epa.gov/iaq/molds
Photo
Photo 60-1
Basement bathroom, Behind or inside of wall behind basement kitchen
 

61) One or more faucets leak or drip when turned off. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 61-1
Basement bathroom
 

62) One or more toilets are loose. Although no moisture in the flooring around the toilet was detected, a qualified contractor should remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repairs if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking.
Photo
Photo 62-1
Bathroom
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Photo 62-2
Bathroom

63) The shower diverter valve for one or more bathtub faucets is defective. A significant amount of water comes out of the bathtub spout when the shower is turned on. Water will be wasted as a result. A qualified plumber should evaluate and replace components or make repairs as necessary.
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Photo 63-1
Bathroom
 

64) One or more sink or tub stopper mechanisms are missing, or need adjustment or repair. Stopper mechanisms should be installed where missing and/or repairs should be made so sink stoppers open and close easily.
Photo
Photo 64-1
Bathroom
 

65) Faucets, spouts, and or shower heads are loose in one or more showers or tubs. These fixtures should be securely anchored to a solid back to prevent movement. Fixtures that move can be damaged over time and can allow leaks withing the wall structure at the wall penetrations. Recommend attaching fixtures to solid backing and caulk around fixtures to prevent leakage.
66) One or more bathtub drains are clogged or drain slowly. Drain(s) should be cleared as necessary, and by a qualified plumber if necessary.
Photo
Photo 66-1
Bathroom
 

67) The enamel coating on one or more bathtubs is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, chipped or worn, and/or rust on some exposed steel. However, no leaks were found due to the deterioration. The client(s) should evaluate to determine if the bathtub(s) should be refinished or replaced.
Photo
Photo 67-1
Bathroom
 

Attic
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68) No accessible attic spaces were found or inspected at this property.
By using this report in any manner the client accepts the following terms and conditions;

Watch Dogs Home Inspectors (Hereinafter "INSPECTOR"?) and the undersigned (hereinafter "CLIENT"?), collectively referred to herein as "the parties". The Parties Understand and Voluntarily Agree as follows:

1. INSPECTOR agrees to perform a visual inspection of the home/building and to provide CLIENT with a written inspection report identifying the defects that INSPECTOR both observed and deemed material. INSPECTOR may offer comments as a courtesy, but these comments will not comprise the bargained-for report. The report is only supplementary to the seller's disclosure.
2. Unless otherwise inconsistent with this Agreement or not possible, INSPECTOR agrees to perform the inspection in accordance to the current Standards of Practice of the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors posted at http://www.nachi.org/sop.htm. CLIENT understands that these standards contain certain limitations, exceptions, and exclusions.
3. The inspection and report are performed and prepared for the use of CLIENT, who gives INSPECTOR permission to discuss observations with real estate agents, owners, repair persons, and other interested parties. INSPECTOR accepts no responsibility for use or misinterpretation by third parties. INSPECTOR'S inspection of the property and the accompanying report are in no way intended to be a guarantee or warranty, express or implied, regarding the future use, operability, habitability or suitability of the home/building or its components. Any and all warranties, express or implied, including warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose, are expressly excluded by this Agreement.

4. INSPECTOR assumes no liability for the cost of repair or replacement of unreported defects or deficiencies either current or arising in the future. CLIENT acknowledges that the liability of INSPECTOR, its agents, employees, for claims or damages, costs of defense or suit, attorney's fees and expenses and payments arising out of or related to the INSPECTOR'S negligence or breach of any obligation under this Agreement, including errors and omissions in the inspection or the report, shall be limited to liquidated damages in an amount equal to the fee paid to the INSPECTOR, and this liability shall be exclusive. CLIENT waives any claim for consequential, exemplary, special or incidental damages or for the loss of the use of the home/building even if the CLIENT has been advised of the possibility of such damages. The parties acknowledge that the liquidated damages are not intended as a penalty but are intended (i) to reflect the fact that actual damages may be difficult and impractical to ascertain; (ii) to allocate risk among the INSPECTOR and CLIENT; and (iii) to enable the INSPECTOR to perform the inspection at the stated fee.

5. INSPECTOR does not perform engineering, architectural, plumbing, or any other job function requiring an occupational license in the jurisdiction where the inspection is taking place, unless the inspector holds a valid occupational license, in which case he/she may inform the CLIENT that he/she is so licensed, and is therefore qualified to go beyond this basic home inspection, and for additional fee, perform additional inspections beyond those within the scope of the basic home inspection. Any agreement for such additional inspections shall be in a separate writing or noted here: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________.

6. In the event of a claim against INSPECTOR, CLIENT agrees to supply INSPECTOR with the following: (1) Written notification of adverse conditions within 14 days of discovery, and (2) Access to the premises. Failure to comply with the above conditions will release INSPECTOR and its agents from any and all obligations or liability of any kind.
7. The parties agree that any litigation arising out of this Agreement shall be filed only in the Court having jurisdiction in the County in which the INSPECTOR has its principal place of business. In the event that CLIENT fails to prove any adverse claims against INSPECTOR in a court of law, CLIENT agrees to pay all legal costs, expenses and fees of INSPECTOR in defending said claims.
8. If any court declares any provision of this Agreement invalid or unenforceable, the remaining provisions will remain in effect. This Agreement represents the entire agreement between the parties. All prior communications are merged into this Agreement, and there are no terms or conditions other than those set forth herein. No statement or promise of INSPECTOR or its agents shall be binding unless reduced to writing and signed by INSPECTOR. No change or modification shall be enforceable against any party unless such change or modification is in writing and signed by the parties. This Agreement shall be binding upon and enforceable by the parties and their heirs, executors, administrators, successors and assignees. CLIENT shall have no cause of action against INSPECTOR after one year from the date of the inspection.
9. Payment of the fee to INSPECTOR (less any deposit noted above) is due upon completion of the on-site inspection. The CLIENT agrees to pay all legal and time expenses incurred in collecting due payments, including attorney's fees, if any. If CLIENT is a corporation, LLC, or similar entity, the person signing this Agreement on behalf of such entity does personally guaranty payment of the fee by the entity.
CLIENT HAS CAREFULLY READ THE FOREGOING, AGREES TO IT, AND ACKNOWLEDGES RECEIPT OF A COPY OF THIS AGREEMENT.

Thank you for allowing Watch Dogs to perform your home inspection. Please call with any questions or concerns.