Website: http://www.reporthost.com/homeworks
Email: homeworksinspections@yahoo.com
Company phone: (573) 721-1454 · (573) 581-5781
Inspector's phone: (573) 581-5781
FAX: (573) 581-5781

  

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): John Doe
Property address: 1 Home Inspection Dr.
Mexico, MO 65265
Inspection date: Friday, July 11, 2006
This report published on 9/12/2008 6:10:45 PM CDT

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Crawl space
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: xxxx
Structures inspected: xxxxx xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Property owner's name: Jane Smith
Time started: 4:00 PM
Time finished: 6:30 PM
Inspection Fee: $$$
Payment method: Invoiced
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Partly cloudy
Temperature: Hot
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: West
Main entrance faces: West
Foundation type: Crawlspace
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Shed


1) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygenists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)
     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Footing material: Poured in place concrete
    Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Wall covering: Composition wood panels
    Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
    Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
    Exterior door material: Hollow core wood
    2) One or more gutters are poorly sloped so that significant amounts of water accumulate in them rather than draining through the downspouts. This can cause gutters to overflow, especially when organic debris such as leaves or needles have accumulated in them. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as correcting the slope in gutters or installing additional downspouts and extensions if necessary.
    3) Soffit panels are loose exposing wood underneath in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 6  
    Gap between soffit and fascia.
     

    4) Rot was found in one or more areas on soffit boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.

    Photo 10  
    Rot at front/left of house under gutter.
     

    5) One or more electric receptacles appear to have no power. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 36  
    Outlet at rear of house doesn't work.
     

    6) The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.

    Photo 3  
    Neighbors yard slopes toward the house. Could cause drainage problem during heavy rainfall.
     

    7) One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.

    Photo 2  
    Need gutter extensions. At least 10' from house.

    Photo 8  
    No downspout.

    8) This property is clad with composition wood fiber siding. Many brands of this type of siding by different manufacturers are known to deteriorate and/or fail prematurely due to moisture penetration. Failure is typically visible in the form of swelling, cracking and delamination, especially at the bottom edges. Class action lawsuits have been filed or are being filed against most manufacturers of this material.

    Some areas of siding on this structure show the symptoms described above, but it appears that the siding hasn't deteriorated to the point of needing replacement. Some manufacturers (Louisiana Pacific) recommend a repair process for this siding where affected areas are sealed with "Permanizer Plus", a flexible primer made by Pittsburgh Paint, followed by two coats of 100% acrylic latex paint. This sealant must be applied to the bottom edges using a brush. The face of the siding can be sprayed. The "Permanizer Plus" sealer isn't required for edges that aren't swollen, cracked or deteriorated, but the acrylic latex should still be brushed on these edges.

    At a minimum, recommend having a qualified contractor seal and repaint as described above, or by other methods specified by the siding's manufacturer. The client(s) may wish to have a qualified contractor evaluate further to determine if some or all of the siding should be replaced.

    For more information, visit:
    Pittsburgh Paints, PRIMERS -THE FOUNDATION FOR A TOP QUALITY JOB
    Failing LP Siding Help Page

    Photo 7  
    Gaps between siding. Needs some type of caulk at various spots around the house.
     

    9) Window glazing putty at one or more windows is missing and/or deteriorated. Putty should be replaced and/or installed where necessary. For more information on replacing window putty, visit: http://www.oldhouseweb.com/stories/Detailed/12216.shtml
    10) Rot at base of trim around garage.

    Photo 18  
    Rot at base of trim at garage door.
     

    11)

    Photo 4  
    Tree growing near electrical grounding rod.
     

    12) Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.

    Photo 12  
    Trees close to roof.
     

    13) One or more sections of foundation and/or exterior walls are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from vegetation, debris and/or stored items.
    14) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
    15) Minor cracks were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
    16)  

    Photo 28  
    Screen door hits roof when opened at rear.
     
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Hipped
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    17) One or more "rubber boot" flashings are damaged or deteriorated and may result in leaks or vermin intrusion. A qualified contractor should replace flashings where necessary.

    Photo 13  
    Bad rubber boot at furnace vent.
     

    18) -One vent is loose and may need to be replaced.
    -Caulk or tar needs to be applied to the vent that is placed horizontally on the roof.
    -Nails are visible on top of the shingles at one spot on the ridge which could mean water intrusion later if they ever pop out. Tar can be applied to these areas.
    -A loose board is resting on the rear porch roof.

    Photo 14  
    Needs caulk/tar around vent.

    Photo 15  
    Old board on top of rear porch roof.

    Photo 16  
    Vent is loose and should be replaced.

    Photo 17  
    Nails showing at shingles.

    19) Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.

    Photo 11  
    Debris in gutters.
     

    20) Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.
    21) While walking on the roof I encountered many soft spots in the roof (about 10% of the surface).I then inspected the attic and found that some of those spots were actually weak areas in the sheathing. When the new shingles were applied some new sheathing was used in certain areas but not entirely. I recommend a roofing specialist to evaluate the roof.

    Photo 26  
    Damaged sheathing in attic.

    Photo 37  
    Damaged sheathing.
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    22) One or more wall and/or ceiling surfaces between the attached garage and interior living spaces have gaps, holes, or missing or inadequate surface materials. These surfaces are intended to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces, and to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so the attached garage wall and ceiling surfaces that adjoin living spaces are tightly sealed and fire rated as per standard building practices. Typically these surfaces require a one-hour fire rating.

    Photo 24  
    Hole in drywall in garage.
     

    23) The automatic door closing device (sprung hinges, etc.) on the garage-house door needs adjustment, repair or replacing. The door doesn't close and latch easily and/or completely via the force of the automatic closing device. This door is intended to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces and to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    24) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

    Photo 22  
    Handyman wiring for garage door opener.

    Photo 23  
    Wiring for garage door.

    Photo 25  
    Improper wiring for gagrage door opener.
     

    25) Extension cords are being used as permanent wiring in one or more areas. They should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring poses a fire and shock hazard, and is an indication that wiring is inadequate and should be updated. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure, resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, and sparks that could start a fire. Extension cords should be removed as necessary, or a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install additional circuits and/or electric receptacles.
    26) The garage-house door poses a fire risk because it's not fire-rated (metal or solid-core construction). A qualified contractor should replace this door with a fire-rated door.
    27) Weatherstrip around or at the bottom of the garage-house door is missing. This door will not shut as the floor stops it from closing. It should be installed where missing and as necessary to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces.
    28) No infared "photo eye" devices are installed for the vehicle door's electric door opener. They've been required on all vehicle door openers since 1993 and improve safety by triggering the vehicle door's auto-reverse feature without need for the door to come in contact with the object, person or animal that's preventing it from closing. Recommend considering having a qualified contractor install these devices for improved safety. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html or http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html
    29) The attic access hatch over the attached garage doesn't have a one-hour fire rating. Wall and ceiling surfaces in an attached garage should be fire rated for one hour to prevent or slow the spread of fire from the garage to interior living spaces. This hatch should be replaced with a material that has a one hour fire rating, such as 5/8 inch Type X sheetrock.
    30) Weatherstrip at the sides and/or bottom of the vehicle door is damaged and/or deteriorated. It should be replaced where necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.

    Photo 1  
    Broken weatherstrip at garage door.
     

    31) Much of the garage, including areas around the interior perimeter and in the center are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
    Insulation depth: 6"
    Insulation estimated R value: R-15
    Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
    Insulation depth: 6"
    Insulation estimated R value: R-15
    32) The flue for the water heater appears to be disconnected and could be venting into the attic which is a safety hazard. The flue should be checked and repaired before using the water heater.

    Photo 38  
    Flue from water heater appears to be venting into attic.
     

    33) Some attic areas were inaccessible due to lack of permanently installed walkways, the possibility of damage to insulation, low height and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Service amperage (amps): 125
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
    34) This property has one or more Federal Pacific Electric brand main service or sub panels that use "Stab-Lok" circuit breakers. Both double and single pole versions of these circuit breakers are known to fail by not tripping when they are supposed to. This is a potential but serious fire hazard. Recommend having a qualified electrician replace any and all Federal Pacific panels. For more information, visit: http://www.inspect-ny.com/fpe/fpepanel.htm

    If the Federal Pacific panel(s) are not replaced, then a qualified electrician should thoroughly evaluate the panel(s) and make repairs as necessary. Recommend installing smoke detectors above Federal Pacific panels.

    Photo 21  
    Federal Pacific panel. These panels have had numerous problems and have been recommended to be replaced. Did not inspect due to safety reasons. Recommend electrician to evaluate and inspect.
     

    35) The electric service is configured so that too many hand movements are necessary to turn off all power for the service. Standard building practices require there to be six or fewer switches and six or fewer hand movements necessary to turn off all power for an electric service. This may be a safety hazard during an emergency when the power needs to be turned off quickly. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    36) The service drop wires are close to contact with trees or vegetation. Recommend having a qualified tree service company or arborist prune or remove trees as necessary to prevent straining or abrading the service drop wires.

    Photo 5  
    Trees near power lines.
     

    37) The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in the main service panel is missing, unreadable or incomplete. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: May 2004
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    Manufacturer: Rudd
    Model: PH40-40F
    38) Water stains were found below the water heater. This may be a sign that the current water heater is failing. The damage appears to have been there for some time which could have been caused by another water heater. There were no active leaks coming from the water heater and it is only 4 years old. The floor should be replaced because the water heater is not 100% supported. If water is found near the heater in the future, a qualified plumbing contractor should evaluate and replace or repair the water heater if necessary.

    Photo 39  
    Damaged floor beneath water heater.
     

    39) A water heater is installed over finished living spaces and has no catch pan and drain installed. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a catch pan and drain to prevent water damage to finished interior spaces below if/when the water heater develops a leak or is drained.
    40) The temperature-pressure relief valve drain line is routed so as to empty into the crawl space. Water may accumulate in the crawl space if the valve develops a leak. A qualified plumber should re-route the drain line so as to drain outside.
    41) No drip leg is installed on the water heater gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the water heater components. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: Outside:1988/Inside: 2004
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
    Manufacturer: Trane
    Model: Outside:TTX730A100A2/Inside:TXC736S5HPAO
    Filter location: At the top of the furnace
    42) The estimated useful life for air conditioning compressors is 8 to 15 years. This unit appears to have exceeded this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    43) No drip leg is installed on the furnace or boiler gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the furnace or boiler components. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.
    44)

    Photo 34  
    Brittle duct tape at main duct shaft under house.
     

    45) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.
    46) Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): 70 PSI
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Galvanized steel
    Drain pipe material: Plastic, Copper
    Waste pipe material: Galvanized steel, Cast iron
    47) One or more active leaks were found in drain and/or waste pipes or fittings. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 29  
    Major water leak under house from bathroom sink.

    Photo 30  
    Minor water leak under house at bathtub.

    48) Two clean-outs were found. A small one between the tub and the main waste pipe and one on the other side of the house through the crawlspace vent. Recommend installing one at the main waste for future plumbing problems.

    Photo 35  
    No main clean-out. Small clean-out only. Another clean-out is located at north side of house through crawlspace vent.
     
     
    Crawl space Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Bearing wall, Concrete
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    Vapor barrier present: Yes
    49) No insulation is installed under the floor in the crawl space. Recommend that a qualified contractor install R19 or better (6" thick fiberglass batt) insulation under the floor for better energy efficiency.
    50) One or more crawl space vent screens are blocked by soil, debris, insulation, stored items or removable panels. This restricts ventilation in the crawl space and may result in increased levels of moisture inside. Materials or items blocking vents should be removed.

    Photo 9  
    Keep crawlspace vents open.
     

    51) No vapor barrier is installed in some areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should install a vapor barrier where missing. Standard building practices require the following:

  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

    Better building practices require that:

  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.
    52) Water supply pipes are uninsulated. Recommend insulating pipes as necessary for better energy efficiency and to prevent water pipes from freezing.
    53) Some crawl space areas were inaccessible due to low height (less than 18 inches), ductwork or pipes blocking, standing water, and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
    54) Water stains were detected where the water heater sits and under the utility room. The subfloor seems to be in fair condition with major water stains.

    Photo 32  
    Water stains/damage under house located under utility room.

    Photo 33  
    Water stains/damage under house located under water heater.

    55) The joists, floor, and foundation appear sound. This one joist was visible close to the crawlspace hatch. It is damaged at the end but still supports the floor above.

    Photo 31  
     
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    56) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    57) The dishwasher appears to be inoperable. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this, and if necessary, the dishwasher should be replaced, or a qualified appliance technician should evaluate and repair.
    58) Minor damage and/or deterioration was found at countertops in one or more areas. The client(s) should evaluate and consider having repairs made, and/or countertops replaced where necessary.
    59) -The plumbing components under the sink show past water leaking and rust. Monitor for future leaks and replace rusted parts with new.
    -The area around the fridge is damaged and needs minor repairs.

    Photo 40  

    Photo 41  
    Rust on valve under kitchen sink.

    Photo 45  
    Stains from refrigerator.
     

    60) One or more kitchen appliances appear to be near, at, or beyond their intended service life of 10 to 15 years. Recommend budgeting for replacements as necessary.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    61) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    62) One or more bathrooms with a shower do not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.
    63) Water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below one or more sinks. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 42  
    Water damage under bathroom sink.
     

    64) Water stain on ceiling.

    Photo 43  
    Water spot on bathroom ceiling.
     
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    65) Two-pronged electric receptacles rather than three-pronged, grounded receptacles are installed in one or more interior rooms. They are considered to be unsafe by today's standards and limit the ability to use appliances that require a ground in these rooms. Examples of appliances that require grounded receptacles include:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. A qualified electrician should evaluate and install grounded receptacles as per the client(s)' needs and standard building practices.
    66) One or more exterior entrance doors are of hollow-core construction rather than solid core. This may represent a security hazard since these doors are easily broken. Hollow-core, exterior entrance doors should be replaced with solid core doors by a qualified contractor.
    67) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 20  
    No faceplate.
     

    68) Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
    69) Two windows that were built to open, will not open, or open only minimally due to their being painted shut, damaged and/or deteriorated in some way. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary so windows open fully, and open and close easily.
    70) The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
    71) Vinyl flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should replace or repair the damaged flooring.

    Photo 46  
    Loose vinyl in utility room.
     

    72) Many light switches are old and the contacts are not definite when they are turned on/off. No arcing was detected but an easy fix for safety reasons.
    73) All windows have minor wear from water and sunlight. Some may need to be reglazed.

    Photo 19  
    Stains at window in living room.

    Photo 44  
    Water/sun damage on windows.

    74) Stains were found in one or more ceiling areas. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found. The stain(s) may be due to past roof and/or plumbing leaks. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this, and monitoring the stained area(s) in the future, especially after heavy or prolonged rain. If elevated moisture is found in the future, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 43  
    Water spot on bathroom ceiling.
     

    75) One or more light fixtures have missing bulbs and could not be fully evaluated. Bulbs may simply need to be installed, or repairs or replacement may be necessary.
    76)  

    Photo 27  
    Water stains in utility room.
     

     
    Thank You for choosing HomeWorks Certified Home Inspections. Please call me if you have any questions. 573-721-1454 or 573-581-5781