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Website: http://www.HomeProNY.com
Email: Doug@HomeProNY.com
Phone: (845) 726-4663
FAX: (845) 314-9663
PO Box 601 
Johnson NY 10933
Inspector: Douglas Myers
Licensed New York State Home Inspector
16000005169

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Corporate Retreat Sample
Property address: Corporate Retreat
Hudson Valley NY
Inspection date: 5/18/2011
This report published on Wednesday, June 20, 2012 1:59:27 PM EDT

View report summary

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major defectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor defectCorrection only involves a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentInformation for you 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms. Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Grounds
Exterior / Foundation
Roof / Attic
Electric
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Water Heater
Heating
Fireplaces / Stoves / Chimneys
Kitchen
Bathrooms / Laundry / Sinks
Interior Rooms / Areas
Private Well
Structural Pest Findings
Septic System Evaluation
Perspective Summary
Additional Inspection Pictures
 
 
General Information Return to table of contents
Report number: V0516-1
Time started: 9:00
Time finished: 4:00
M. Douglas Myers: M. Douglas Myers
Present during inspection: Client Camp Employees
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: No
Weather conditions: Heavy Rain
Temperature: Cool 58
Ground condition: Wet
Type of building: Children's Camp - 9 Buildings
Age of building(s): Various
 
 
Grounds Return to table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: swimming pools, spas, hot tubs, water features and related equipment; playground, recreation or leisure equipment; landscape lighting; areas below exterior structures with less than three feet of vertical clearance; irrigation systems; invisible fencing; sea walls, docks and boathouses. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not test or determine the adequacy of drainage systems for grounds, walkways, below-grade stairs and roof downspouts. The inspector does not provide an evaluation of geological conditions and/or site stability, compliance of pool or spa fencing with municipal requirements, or determination that deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight.
Site profile: Moderate slope
Condition of driveway: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Driveway material: Asphalt, Gravel
Condition of sidewalks and/or patios: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete, Paving stones various
Condition of deck, patio and/or porch covers: Appeared serviceable
Deck, patio, porch cover material and type: Open, Covered (Refer to Roof section)
Condition of decks, porches and/or balconies: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of guardrails: Appeared serviceable
Deck, porch and/or balcony material: Wood
Condition of exterior stairs: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of handrails: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Exterior stair material: Wood, Concrete
1) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Rot or water damage was found at one or more decks, porches or balconies in decking boards, joists, beams. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced. The decking over the slab on building #1 has collapsed due to the slab collapse in the rear of the building. The camp maintenance person states that there is an insurance claim for this damage. Information should be obtained to determine the amount of the settlement and cost of replacement. This also has adversely affected the sprinkler system and rendered it nonoperational.

Photo 50  
Rotted door at deck on building #1 rotted due to splash back.

Photo 52  
Rotted deck sections building #1.

Photo 53  
Some deck boards have been replaced on building #1.

Photo 54  
Rotted deck boards on building #1.

Photo 98  
Damaged decking at building #9.
 

2) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Exterior steps were substandard. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary. The steps in various areas of the property were substandard and should be repaired or replaced. Many had uneven risers and a lack of proper hand railing.

Photo 91  
Substandard steps with uneven risers leading to building #9.

Photo 93  
Substandard steps with uneven risers leading to building #9.

Photo 99  
Substandard steps with uneven risers leading to building #9.

Photo 159  
Damaged steps at building #3.

3) Safety, Repair/Replace - Many decks constructed for the chalet buildings are substandard and will need to be repaired or replaced. Some are poorly fastened to the building and most do not have proper footings or support.

Photo 182  
Damaged siding and decking on building #2 due to no installed flashing.

Photo 189  
Damaged siding and decking on building #2 due to no installed flashing.

Note poorly supported corner for the building

Photo 190  
Poorly supported deck with no footings and heaving on building #6.

Photo 211  
Wide spacing of the deck boards 3/16" would be the typical spacing.

Photo 226  
Deck on building #6.
 

4) Major defect, Repair/Replace - The tile patio at building #7 is deteriorated and will need to be replaced.

Photo 107  
Damaged tiling and deteriorated substrate on building #7.

Photo 124  
Damaged tiling and deteriorated substrate on building #7.

5) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The driveway and parking areas had significant cracks, settlement, heaving and/or deterioration in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sections as necessary.

Photo 59  

Photo 60  

6) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Sidewalks and/or patios had significant cracks, settlement, heaving and/or deterioration in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sections as necessary.

Photo 144  
Building #7.

Photo 238  
Entry way from parking to the office area.

Photo 198  
Damaged walkway at building #5.
 

7) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more decks, porches and/or balconies were damaged, deteriorated, substandard. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary. The deck on buildings #'s 1,2,3,4 and 9 are all in need of repairs. There are areas that will need to be replaced as well as repaired. Building #1 has already had some of the decking boards replaced.

Photo 171  
Wide spacing of the deck boards 3/16" would be the typical spacing. Building #6.

Photo 227  
No installed deck flashing which will result in siding, structure and deck rot. Building #6.

8) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Fasteners for hardware at decks, porches or balconies were missing. For example, at joist hangers at building # 7. All nail holes for this type of hardware should be filled with appropriate fasteners such as joist hanger (tico) nails, common nails or screws rated for structural applications. Fasteners should be rated for outdoor exposure. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Photo 142  
Building # 9.
 

9) Repair/Replace - The perimeter grading in most of the buildings sloped towards the building in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the building foundation. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.

Most of the buildings were suffering from elevated basement and crawl space water and moisture. This is contributing to wood rot and mold formation.

Roof gutters would greatly help in this matter.

Photo 136  

Photo 172  
Building #6.

Photo 175  
This is an area where animals are entering building #6.

Photo 188  
Another spot where animals are getting into the building #6.

10) Repair/Maintain - Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines was in contact with or less than one foot from the building exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the building exterior.

This is mainly in the chalet area and the main building has a tree growing up alongside the building.

Photo 41  

Photo 42  

Photo 130  

Photo 131  

Photo 184  

Photo 202  

11) Maintain - Wooden deck, porch and/or balcony surfaces, railings should be cleaned and sealed by a qualified person.

Photo 44  
 

12) Evaluate - One or more significantly sized diseased or dead trees were found on the property grounds. The client may wish to have them removed, or to have them evaluated by a qualified arborist.
 
 
Exterior / Foundation Return to table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: below-grade foundation walls and footings, or those obscured by vegetation or building components; exterior building surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determination the adequacy of sump pumps, seismic reinforcement, nor determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.
Condition of wall covering: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood, Vinyl
Condition of foundation and footings: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Foundation type: Unfinished basement, Crawlspace, Post and pier
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete, Concrete block
Footing material: Not determined
Condition of floor substructure: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Pier or support post material: Wood
Beam material: Solid wood, Built up wood
Floor structure: Solid wood joists
Condition of crawl space: Required repair and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Crawl space inspection method: Traversed, Partially traversed, Viewed from hatch
Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt, None visible
Ventilation: Appears serviceable
Vapor barrier present: No
Condition of the basement: Required repair and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: below-grade foundation walls and footings, or those obscured by vegetation or building components; exterior building surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determination the adequacy of sump pumps, seismic reinforcement, nor determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: below-grade foundation walls and footings, or those obscured by vegetation or building components; exterior building surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determination the adequacy of sump pumps, seismic reinforcement, nor determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: below-grade foundation walls and footings, or those obscured by vegetation or building components; exterior building surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determination the adequacy of sump pumps, seismic reinforcement, nor determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.
13) Safety, Major defect - There was a concrete slab with a deck built on top at building # 1 which has collapsed into the crawl space / basement area of building #1. It is reported that there is an insurance claim currently pending concerning this damage. Information should be gathered concerning this and possible collections and repairs.

Photo 25  

Photo 43  

14) Major defect, Repair/Replace - The crawl space in building #7, #2 and #4 was wet and suffering from elevated moisture levels. There have been repairs made but they were mostly done to help prevent further damage. The floor structure is damaged in some locations as well as poorly installed insulation which is wicking the moisture to the wood structure further damaging it.

Photo 137  
Building #7.

Photo 138  
Building #7.

Photo 187  
Building #6.

Photo 193  

Photo 194  
Building #4.

Photo 216  

Photo 217  

Photo 223  

Photo 224  
This is a saturated wall in the crawl space of building #4. They were trying to use this building during freezing weather and boxed in the plumbing system and heated it. With an open crawl space this is difficult to do and many repairs or upgrades will be needed to make these buildings suitable for winter use.
 

15) Major defect, Maintain - The exterior finish over many of buildings was failing. A qualified painting contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain the entire structure as per standard building practices.

Some of the buildings had failing finish manly due to water intrusion.

Photo 160  
Note siding in contact with the ground which increases the risk for rot and insect intrusion in building #3..

Photo 191  

16) Major defect - Building #7 is showing severe signs of floor rot and deterioration. There are high levels of moisture in the crawl space with the roof water being directly introduced into the crawl space.

There is exposed floor rot and sagging that will need to be replaced.

Photo 113  
Building #7.

Photo 114  
Building #7.

Photo 115  
This area of the flooring has sagged away from the wall and you can see directly into the crawl space of building #7.

Photo 117  

17) Major defect - All of the chalet buildings #'s 2,3,4,5,6 were constructed as seasonal light construction buildings. They are built on piers with no foundations and shallow pier footings. They are sagging in many areas and suffering from moisture damage to both the 1st. floor structure and the roof framing due to water intrusion.

These buildings will all need major repairs to bring them into a good state of repair and maintenance. Maintenance has been greatly deferred for the past few years.

Photo 195  
Building #5.

Photo 215  

Photo 222  

Photo 234  
Building #4.

18) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Many sections of siding and/or trim were damaged, deteriorated. A qualified person should evaluate and repair, replace or install siding or trim as necessary.

Photo 45  
Building #1.

Photo 165  
Building #3.

Photo 208  
Building #2.

Photo 214  
Building #2.

Photo 158  
Building #3.
 

19) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Rot or water damage was found at one or more sections of siding, trim, window sills, window frames, soffits, fascia, rafter tails in many of the buildings. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.

Photo 61  

Photo 77  

Photo 183  

Photo 209  
Building #2.

Photo 220  
Building #4.

Photo 221  
Building #4.

Photo 225  
 

20) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Rot or water damage was found at one or more sections of the floor substructure, including floor decking, floor sheathing, joists. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced. Some buildings had rot and deterioration to the first floor structure due to elevated moisture levels and condensation.
21) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Standing water was found in one or more sections of the basement building #1 and #3. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. A qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in basements include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter basements, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing a sump pump.

    Photo 11  

    Photo 12  

    Photo 20  

    Photo 21  

    22) Repair/Replace - No vapor barrier was installed in the crawl spaces of all the buildings. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the building from the soil. A qualified person should install a vapor barrier as per standard building practices.

    Photo 15  

    Photo 18  

    Photo 141  
    Building #7.

    Photo 149  
    Building #3.

    Photo 186  
    Building #4.

    Photo 235  

    23) Repair/Replace - The floor insulation's R rating is significantly less than what's recommended for this area. Recommend having a qualified contractor install additional insulation as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency. For more information, visit:
    http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumer/tips/insulation.html

    24) Repair/Replace - The floor insulation in some areas of the crawl space was fallen down, missing, damaged, deteriorated. This may result in increased heating or cooling costs due to decreased energy efficiency. A qualified person should repair, replace or install insulation as necessary. For more information, visit:
    http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumer/tips/insulation.html

    25) Repair/Replace - Insulation in all crawl spaces, basement was damaged, apparently by rodents (burrow holes, feces, urine stains, etc.). The client may want to have insulation replaced for sanitary reasons or to prevent odors. Most, if not all, of the buildings had animals living in them. Woodchuck and skunk holes were observed in some crawl spaces.
    26) Repair/Maintain, Evaluate - Moderate cracks (1/8 inch to 3/4 inch) and/or leaning were found in the foundation. This may be a structural concern, or an indication that settlement is ongoing. The client should consider hiring qualified contractors and/or engineers as necessary for further evaluation. Such contractors may include:
  • Foundation repair contractors who may prescribe repairs, and will give cost estimates for prescribed repairs
  • Masonry contractors who repair and/or replace brick veneer
  • Geotechnical engineers who attempt to determine if settlement is ongoing, and what the cause of the settlement is
  • Structural engineers who determine if repairs are necessary, and prescribe those repairs

    At a minimum, recommend sealing cracks to prevent water infiltration. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including hydraulic cement, resilient caulks and epoxy sealants.
    27) Repair/Maintain - Soil was in contact with or less than six inches from siding and/or trim. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Soil should be graded and/or removed as necessary so there are at least six inches of space between the siding and trim and the soil below.

    Many of the buildings had wood structure in contact with the ground. This will and has led to many areas of rot and deterioration.

    Photo 196  
     

    28) Repair/Maintain - Caulk was missing, deteriorated in many areas. For example, around doors, at siding butt joints, at siding-trim junctions, at wall penetrations. A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary. For more information, visit:
    http://www.reporthost.com/_docs/FPL_Caulking_Ins_Outs.pdf

    29) Repair/Maintain - One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundations. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including hydraulic cement, resilient caulks and epoxy sealants.

    This is a general statement that applies to all of the buildings.

    30) Comment - sections of the floor substructure were not fully evaluated due lack of access from limited height, ducts or pipes, live or dead vermin present and insulation.
    31) Comment - Many crawl space sections were not evaluated due to lack of access from the following conditions: live or dead vermin present, standing water.
    32) Comment - Crawl space views.

    Photo 16  
    Remove all debris and install a heavy gauge vapor barrier to control ground moisture. Remove all debris. Note poorly support beam with a wood column with mold growing. Tis applies to all of the buildings.

    Photo 17  
    Remove all debris and install a heavy gauge vapor barrier to control ground moisture. Remove all debris. Note poorly support beam with a wood column with mold growing. Tis applies to all of the buildings.

    Photo 139  
    Open access to the crawl space building # 7.

    Photo 140  
    Poorly installed insulation that is falling due to high moisture conditions in building #7.

    Photo 151  
    Note poorly supported floor structure and open electrical box building #3.

    Photo 152  
    Note poorly supported floor structure building #3.

    Photo 154  
    Building #3.

    Photo 155  
    Note exposed wiring. All wiring has to be terminated within closed boxes in building #3..

    Photo 236  
    This is an attempt to get heat into the crawlspace of building #4. Note electrical connections without a box.
    This is not an approved heater for wet conditions and poses a fire risk.
    Stained wall panels due to elevated moisture levels.
     

    33) Comment - Basement views building #1.

    Photo 19  

    Photo 22  

    Photo 23  
     
     
     
    Roof / Attic Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation; solar roofing components; any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determination if rafters, trusses, joists, beams, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing. The inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining roof surface life, does not determine that the roof has absolutely no leaks at the time of the inspection, and does not determine that the roof won't leak in the future. Only active leaks and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. To absolutely determine than no leaks exist, complete access to all roof structure areas must be available during a wide variety of weather conditions, including prolonged heavy rain, high wind from varying directions, heavy accumulations of snow and/or ice, and melting snow and ice.
    Condition of roof structure: Appeared serviceable
    Roof type: Gable
    Age of roof surface(s): Various
    Source for building age: Inspector's estimate
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars
    Condition of shingle and/or shake roof surface materials: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: One, Two
    Condition of exposed flashings: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Near, at or beyond service life
    Gutter and downspout material: None
    Gutter and downspout installation: None
    Condition of attic: Required repair and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Attic inspection method: Viewed from hatch(es), Traversed, Partially traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Ceiling insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt, None, None visible
    Vapor retarder: None visible
    Roof ventilation: Appears serviceable
    Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation; solar roofing components; any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determination if rafters, trusses, joists, beams, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing. The inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining roof surface life, does not determine that the roof has absolutely no leaks at the time of the inspection, and does not determine that the roof won't leak in the future. Only active leaks and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. To absolutely determine than no leaks exist, complete access to all roof structure areas must be available during a wide variety of weather conditions, including prolonged heavy rain, high wind from varying directions, heavy accumulations of snow and/or ice, and melting snow and ice.
    34) Major defect, Repair/Replace - No ceiling insulation was installed in the attic in some buildings. A qualified contractor should install insulation for better energy efficiency and as per standard building practices with an R rating recommended for this area. For more information, visit:
    http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumer/tips/insulation.html

    35) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more areas of the roof structure were wet or had elevated levels of moisture at the time of the inspection. There appears to be an active leak in the roof or building exterior. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 80  
    Leaking roofing and flashing in building #1.

    Photo 122  
    Note improperly installed insulation and wet insulation in building #7.

    36) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Roof repairs were needed because many buildings composition shingles had the following conditions: missing shingles, loose shingles, granules worn away, nail pops, lifting, curling, cupping, cracking, defective shingles, damage, deterioration. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. Building #1 - This shingle roof appears to be +- 10 years old. Some areas need repairs and there are some missing shingles.

    Photo 56  
    Missing and loose shingles on building #1.

    Photo 118  
    Roof in need of replacement on building #7.

    Photo 162  
    Deteriorated roof in need of replacement on building #3.
     

    37) Repair/Replace - One or more end caps were missing on gutters. Water may accumulate around the building's foundation as a result. A qualified person should install end caps where missing.

    Photo 173  
     

    38) Repair/Replace - The attic insulation in building #7 is incorrectly installed and will lead to moisture condensation and wood damage.

    Photo 121  

    Photo 123  

    39) Repair/Maintain - The bath fans were venting directly into the attic in building #1. This is a concern due to excessive moisture build up. Vent the fan to the exterior of the house.

    Photo 89  

    Photo 90  

    40) Maintain, Monitor - One or more roof surface sections were designed so as to be much more likely to accumulate debris and/or snow. For example, where two slopes converge. Leaks may occur as a result. The client should monitor such areas for accumulated debris in the future and clean as necessary. Building # 2 has a poor roof design where the roof slopes to the middle of the building. This roof is currently leaking over the laundry area and the ceiling has fallen. A rubber roof would help in this area to prevent water intrusion into the building.

    Photo 203  

    Photo 207  

    41) Evaluate, Monitor - Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may be caused by a past leak. Recommend asking the property owner about past leaks. The client should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 76  
     

    42) Monitor - There was evidence of animals living in the attic of building #1

    Photo 88  
     

    43) Comment - No accessible attic spaces were found or inspected in some buildings at this property.
    44) Comment - Attic views building #1.

    Photo 78  

    Photo 79  

    Photo 81  

    Photo 82  

    Photo 83  

    Photo 84  

    Photo 85  

    Photo 86  

    Photo 87  
     

    45) Comment - Attic views building #4.

    Photo 228  

    Photo 229  

    Photo 230  
    Note open electric box.

    Photo 231  
    Note areas of missing insulation. The insulation was most likely gathered by animals for nesting and bedding materials.

    Photo 232  
     

    46) - Roof observations:

    Building #1 - The roof is in overall good condition with some roofing repairs needed. There are loose and missing shingles in some areas. The flashing is leaking at the chimney.

    Building #2 - This roof is currently leaking and ceiling damage has occurs in the building. The roof has poor design features which drains water towards the middle of the building. Possibly the installation of a rubber roof will help.

    Building #3 - The roofing on this building is nearing the point of replacement. Roofs that have a tree canopy over them generally have a shorter life span.

    Building #4 - The roofing on this building is nearing the point of replacement. Roofs that have a tree canopy over them generally have a shorter life span.


    Building #5 - The roofing on this building is nearing the point of replacement. Roofs that have a tree canopy over them generally have a shorter life span.


    Building #6 - The roofing on this building is nearing the point of replacement. Roofs that have a tree canopy over them generally have a shorter life span.


    Building #7 - This roof is at the end of its useful life and will be needing immediate replacement.

    Building #8 - This building is the Quonset building with a canopy roof. The roofing material appears to be in serviceable condition.

    Building #9 - This roof is in serviceable condition.

    Photo 1  
    Building #8.

    Photo 55  
    Building #1.

    Photo 57  
    Building #1.

    Photo 58  
    Building #1.

    Photo 92  
    Building #7.

    Photo 119  
    Deteriorated roofing on building #7 is in need of replacement.

    Photo 143  
    Chalet roofing in poor condition with moss growth due to over hanging trees.

    Photo 166  
    Chalet roofing in poor condition with moss growth due to over hanging trees.

    Photo 167  
    Chalet roofing in poor condition with moss growth due to over hanging trees.

    Photo 46  

    Photo 47  

    Photo 48  

    47) - Consider installing gutters to control water coming off of the roof and directing it away from the building.

    Photo 164  
    Rear view building #3.

    Photo 168  

    Photo 185  
    All the water coming off of this roof is being directly introduced into the crawlspace.

    Photo 192  
    All the water coming off of this roof is being directly intrduced into the crawlspace.

    Photo 219  
    The gutters are missing from this building due to rotted and missing facia material.
     
     
     
    Electric Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, does not determine if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific needs, nor determine if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, install or change light bulbs, nor determine the operability of every wall switch.
    Electric service condition: Appeared serviceable
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Service voltage (volts): 120
    Service amperage (amps): Various
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 100, 200
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil, Cold water supply pipes
    Condition of main service panel: Appeared serviceable
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
    Condition of branch circuit wiring: Serviceable
    48) Safety, Repair/Replace - The fire alarm system is not currently working and will need to be repaired. The alarm company should be contacted to obtain information concerning the condition and repairs to the system.

    Photo 31  
     

    49) Comment - There are a total of 8 electrical services to the property.
    50) - Electrical observations:

    Building #1 - In overall good condition with some minor repairs needed. Missing box covers, broken receptacles, etc.

    Building #2 - In overall good condition with some minor repairs needed. Missing box covers, broken receptacles, etc.

    Building #3 - In overall good condition with some minor repairs needed. Missing box covers, broken receptacles, etc.

    Building #4 - In overall good condition with some minor repairs needed. Missing box covers, broken receptacles, etc.

    Building #5 - In overall good condition with some minor repairs needed. Missing box covers, broken receptacles, etc.

    Building #6 - In overall good condition with some minor repairs needed. Missing box covers, broken receptacles, etc.

    Building #7 - In overall good condition with some minor repairs needed. Missing box covers, broken receptacles, etc.

    Building #8 - In overall good condition with some minor repairs needed. Missing box covers, broken receptacles, etc.

    Building #9 - In overall good condition with some minor repairs needed. Missing box covers, broken receptacles, etc.

    Photo 4  
    Panel located in building #1.

    Photo 5  
    This is the electrician currently servicing the property. They should be contacted to obtain information they can provide about maintenence to the property and any defencies noted.

    Photo 39  
    Panel located in the the pump building.

    Photo 67  
    Panel located in building #1.

    Photo 68  
    Panel located in building #1. Not missing knockouts.

    Photo 101  
    Panel located in building #9.

    Photo 102  
    Panel located in building #9. Note the the 200 amp main breaker is no longer being used and there is a 100 amp breaker installed.

    Photo 105  
    Panel installed in building #8.

    Photo 110  
    Panels located in building #7.

    Photo 135  
    Panel located on the exterior of building #7.

    Photo 163  
    Panels for all the chalet buildings located on building #3.

    Photo 213  
    Electrical service for building #2.

    Photo 27  
    Corroded box in the basement of building #1.

    Photo 72  
    Loose lighting building #1.

    Photo 74  
    Damaged receptacle building #1.

    Photo 134  
    Open electrical box building #7.

    Photo 153  
    Exposed electric wiring in the crawl space.

    Photo 73  
    Building #1.
     
     
    Plumbing / Fuel Systems Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: private wells and sewage disposal systems; main, side and lateral sewer lines; gray water systems; pressure boosting systems; incinerating or composting toilets; fire suppression sprinkler systems; water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems; plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks; backflow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determining the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks.
    Condition of service and main line: Appeared serviceable
    Location of main water meter: Basement of building #1
    Location of main water shut: Basement of building #1
    Water service: Private
    Service pipe material: Steel
    Condition of supply lines: Appeared serviceable
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Condition of waste lines: Appeared serviceable
    Waste pipe material: Plastic
    Condition of fuel system: Appeared serviceable
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: private wells and sewage disposal systems; main, side and lateral sewer lines; gray water systems; pressure boosting systems; incinerating or composting toilets; fire suppression sprinkler systems; water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems; plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks; backflow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determining the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks.
    51) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Copper oil supply lines in building #1 were exposed and subject to damage. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so oil supply lines are not subject to damage.

    Photo 13  
    Copper fuel lines are exposed and in water exposing them to damage and corrosion.

    Photo 14  
    Copper fuel lines are exposed and in water exposing them to damage and corrosion.

    52) Safety, Evaluate - A water filtration system was installed on the premises. Only a limited evaluation of this system was performed during the inspection. The client should consult with the seller on this system to determine its condition, required maintenance, age and expected remaining life, etc. There are two chlorination pumps located in the pump house, but there are no chlorine tanks. There does not appear to be any water treatment currently being done on the potable water.

    Photo 38  
     

    53) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Waste lines were substandard, non standard in one or more areas. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 32  
    There were many areas with mixed drain line piping being used. This makes a weak joint and susceptible to leaking.

    Photo 132  

    Photo 239  
    A clean out T with cap installed on the exterior of building # 2 most likely installed to clear a blockage.
     

    54) Repair/Replace - The main supply line under building # 4 was split and water has apparently been running under the building for quite awhile.

    Photo 237  
     

    55) Evaluate - The underground oil tank may be old and/or at risk of leaking. The estimated lifespan for many buried oil tanks is 10 to 15 years. The client should consult with the property owner to determine the age of the tank and review service records if possible. Recommend having a qualified contractor or full-service oil provider test the tank for leaks and for water in the bottom. For more information, visit:
    http://www.inspect-ny.com/oiltanks/oiltanklife.htm

    56) Monitor - There is a fire suppression system installed in building #1. This system is not operating due to broken piping from a collapsed slab over the 10,000 gallon holding tank. A fire suppression company should determine the condition and operation of the system.

    Photo 10  
    Compressor used for the fire suppression system.

    Photo 24  

    Photo 36  
     

    57) Comment - The water service was not turned on during the inspection. As a result, plumbing supply, drain and waste lines, fixtures, and some appliances such as water heaters weren't fully evaluated. Recommend that a full evaluation of the plumbing system be made after the water supply is turned back on.
    58) Comment - Most components of this property's plumbing system were "winterized" at the time of the inspection. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the plumbing system. This may include toilets, sinks, bathtubs, showers, fixtures and supply, drain, waste and vent lines.
    59) Comment - A sewage ejector pump was installed on the premises. These systems are typically sealed. Only a limited evaluation, No evaluation of this waste disposal system was performed during the inspection. This system has moving parts and is subject to clogging and/or damage from disposal of items such as disposable diapers and sanitary napkins. Recommend that this pump and related equipment (piping, valves, etc.) be evaluated by a qualified plumber and repaired if necessary every few years in the future, or as per the manufacturer's specifications. Typically these pumps have a lifespan of from seven to ten years.
    60) Comment - There are two 10,000 gallon water storage tanks installed. One tank is for the potable water system and located next to building #1. There is also a 10,000 gallon tank installed for the fire suppression system located under the slab in the rear of building #1.

    Photo 26  
    This is the fire suppression tank showing the colapsed slab laying on the tank. The piping to this tank was damaged and will need to be repaired.

    Photo 28  
    The water meter for the potable water service.

    Photo 29  
    This is the entry point in building #1 where the water service enters from the pump house and the 10,000 gallon domestic water tank.

    Photo 30  
    Pump control box located in building #1.

    Photo 35  
    This is the 10,000 gallon potable water tank.

    Photo 37  
    These are the pumps for the potable water system located in the pump house.

    61) - Plumbing Observations:

    Building #1 - The plumbing system appeared to be in overall serviceable condition although water was turned off and no fixtures were operated. There will most likely be some leakage which is typical of winterized plumbing systems.

    Building #2 - The plumbing system appeared to be in overall serviceable condition although water was turned off and no fixtures were operated. There will most likely be some leakage which is typical of winterized plumbing systems.


    Building #3 - Water was on to this building which is currently being used as the camp office.

    Building #4 - The plumbing system appeared to be in overall serviceable condition although water was turned off and no fixtures were operated. There will most likely be some leakage which is typical of winterized plumbing systems.


    Building #5 - The plumbing system appeared to be in overall serviceable condition although water was turned off and no fixtures were operated. There will most likely be some leakage which is typical of winterized plumbing systems.


    Building #6 - The plumbing system appeared to be in overall serviceable condition although water was turned off and no fixtures were operated. There will most likely be some leakage which is typical of winterized plumbing systems.


    Building #7 - The plumbing system appeared to be in overall serviceable condition although water was turned off and no fixtures were operated. There will most likely be some leakage which is typical of winterized plumbing systems.


    Building #8 - There did not appear to be water service to this building.

    Building #9 - The plumbing system appeared to be in overall serviceable condition although water was turned off and no fixtures were operated. There will most likely be some leakage which is typical of winterized plumbing systems.
     
     
    Water Heater Return to table of contents
    Condition of water heater: Near, at or beyond service life
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Electricity, Oil
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: solar water heating systems; circulation systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on water heaters, does not determine if water heaters are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit.
    62) Repair/Replace - Except for building #1 all other buildings have electric water heaters. For the most part these water heaters were in poor condition and will most likely be in need of replacement.

    Photo 133  

    Photo 148  

    Photo 178  

    Photo 199  

    Photo 204  

    Photo 206  

    Photo 233  
     

    63) Comment - The water heaters servicing the main building were two Super Stor units 50 gallons each. Water was off to the building and these units were not operated. One unit had a cracked case that should not affect the operation of the unit.

    Photo 7  

    Photo 8  
     
     
    Heating Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; solar, coal or wood fired heat systems; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating system components, does not determine if heating systems are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks.
    Condition of heating system: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Location of heating system: Basement building #1
    Heating type: Baseboard, Hot water
    Fuel type: Oil
    Manufacturer: Weil-McLain
    64) Safety, Repair/Maintain, Evaluate - The last service date of this system appeared to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client should ask the property owner when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
    65) Evaluate, Comment - This heating system was not fully evaluated because the following condition(s) existed for the boiler: system winterized. Recommend that a full evaluation be made by a qualified person when conditions have been corrected so the system is operable. Note that as per the standards of practice for NACHI (http://www.nachi.org) and ASHI (www.ashi.org), the inspector is not required to operate shut-off valves, pilot lights or overcurrent protection devices, or any controls other than "normal controls".
    66) Comment - Installed heating system in building #1.

    Photo 6  
     

    67) Comment - All of the buildings, except building #1, had electric baseboard heaters installed.

    Photo 95  

    Photo 111  
    Building #7.

    Photo 156  

    Photo 179  
     
     
    Fireplaces / Stoves / Chimneys Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: coal stoves, gas logs, chimney flues (except where visible). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of drafting or sizing in fireplace and stove flues, nor determine if prefabricated or zero clearance fireplaces are installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. The inspector does not perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit.
    Condition of fireplaces, stoves: Appeared serviceable
    Location #A: Building #1
    Fireplace type: Masonry
    Fuel type: Wood
    Condition of chimneys: Appeared serviceable
    Chimney type: Masonry
    68) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The masonry chimney at location # building #3 showed moderate evidence of deterioration, including deteriorated mortar, concrete.
    The fireplace and chimney at building # 7 was damaged and was or is currently leaking.

    A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 169  
    Damaged chimney on building #3.

    Photo 109  
    The fireplace chimney at building #7 was covered with a tarp due to leakage. This should be corrected when the new roof is installed on this building.

    69) Comment - All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
     
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: free-standing or portable appliances such as dishwashers, trash compactors, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers; specialty appliances such as hot water dispensers, water filters and trash compactors; appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self and/or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances such as dishwashers, garbage disposals, trash compactors, ovens, broilers, etc.
    70) Comment - There is a commercial kitchen in building #1. This was not inspected and no observation are offered. A commercial kitchen company should determine the condition of the equipment.

    Photo 66  
     
     
     
    Bathrooms / Laundry / Sinks Return to table of contents
    Limitations: Water was off to all buildings and no plumbing fixtures were operated.

    The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; bidets, heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.

    Location #A: All buildings
    71) Monitor - Water was off to all buildings except the office. The bathrooms appear to be in operational condition.
     
     
    Interior Rooms / Areas Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems; communications wiring; central vacuum systems; elevators and stair lifts; sources of obnoxious odors; cosmetic deficiencies due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment; deficiencies relating to interior decorating; low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Determining the cause of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.
    Exterior door material: Wood, Metal
    Condition of exterior entry doors: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Condition of interior doors: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Type of windows: Wood, Multi, Casement, Double hung
    Condition of windows: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Wall type or covering: Drywall, Wood
    Condition of walls: Appeared serviceable
    Ceiling type or covering: Drywall, Tiles
    Condition of ceilings: Appeared serviceable
    Flooring type or covering: Carpet, Wood, Tile
    Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems; communications wiring; central vacuum systems; elevators and stair lifts; sources of obnoxious odors; cosmetic deficiencies due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment; deficiencies relating to interior decorating; low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Determining the cause of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.
    72) Major defect, Repair/Replace - Many exterior doors had moderate to major damage and deterioration. A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary. Many exterior doors in most buildings had damage from water intrusion. The damage includes wood rot to the wooden doors as well as rust and corrosion to steel doors. Most of these doors will need to be replaced.

    Photo 70  
    Damaged door building #1.

    Photo 145  
    Damaged door building #3.

    Photo 146  
    Damaged door building #3. Note saturated conditions in the cellar way.

    Photo 176  
    Damaged door building #6.

    Photo 177  
    Damaged door building #6.

    Photo 108  
    Damaged door building #9.

    Photo 147  
    Damaged door building #3.
     

    73) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Some windows that were built to open wouldn't open, were difficult to open and close. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    74) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Some windows were water damaged, deteriorated. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary.
    75) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Seals between multi-pane glass in many windows appear to have failed based on condensation or stains between the panes of glass. The view through the window may be obscured, and accumulated condensation leaking into wall cavities is a conducive condition for wood destroying organisms. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace glass where necessary.

    The client should be aware that evidence of broken seals may be more or less visible from one day to the next depending on the temperature, humidity, sunlight, etc. Windows or glass doors other than those that the inspector identified may also have failed seals and need glass replaced too.

    Photo 64  
    Building #1.

    Photo 69  
    Building #1.

    Photo 71  
    Building #1.
     

    76) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Floors in one or more areas were not level. Significant repairs may be needed to make floors level, such as repairs to the foundation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    77) Repair/Replace - Carpeting in many areas was stained, damaged. A qualified contractor should replace as necessary
    78) Repair/Replace - Glass in some windows was cracked or broken. A qualified contractor should replace glass where necessary.

    Photo 181  
    Broken picture window building #6.
     

    79) Minor defect - Minor cracks and/or holes were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
    80) Minor defect - Minor cracks and/or holes were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 112  
     
     
     
    Private Well Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The inspector does not test private well water for contamination or pollutants, determine if the supply and/or flow are adequate, or provide an estimate for remaining life of well pumps, pressure tanks or equipment. Only visible components are evaluated. The client should have qualified lab test the well water for bacterial contaminants. A qualified well specialist should evaluate the well and perform a yield test.
    81) - The well and system was not inspected and no observations made.

    Water was off to most of the property.

    The system is reported to be an artisan well that feeds a 10,000 gallon tank that feeds into the basement of building #1. There are four pressure tanks that serve all of the buildings and all shut off valves are located in the basement of building #1.

    A plumber experienced in these types of systems should be retained to determine the condition of the tans and associated equipment.

    Photo 9  
    The installed pressure tanks for the potable water supply.
     
     
     
    Structural Pest Findings Return to table of contents
    Limitations: This report only includes findings from accessible and visible areas on the day of the inspection. In addition to the inaccessible areas documented in this report, examples of other inaccessible areas include: sub areas less than 18 inches in height; attic areas less than five feet in height, areas blocked by ducts, pipes or insulation; areas where locks or permanently attached covers prevent access; areas where insulation would be damaged if traversed; areas obscured by vegetation. All inaccessible areas are subject to infestation or damage from wood destroying organisms. The inspector does not move furnishings, stored items, debris, floor or wall coverings, insulation, or other materials as part of the inspection, nor perform destructive testing. Wood destroying organisms may infest, reinfest or become active at anytime. No warranty is provided as part of this inspection.
    Visible evidence of active wood destroying insects: Yes
    Visible evidence of active wood decay fungi: Yes
    Visible evidence of past wood destroying insects: Yes
    Visible evidence of past wood decay fungi: Yes
    Visible evidence of damage by wood destroying insects: Yes
    Visible evidence of damage by wood decay fungi: Yes
    Visible evidence of conditions conducive to wood destroying organisms: Yes
    Limitations: This report only includes findings from accessible and visible areas on the day of the inspection. In addition to the inaccessible areas documented in this report, examples of other inaccessible areas include: sub areas less than 18 inches in height; attic areas less than five feet in height, areas blocked by ducts, pipes or insulation; areas where locks or permanently attached covers prevent access; areas where insulation would be damaged if traversed; areas obscured by vegetation. All inaccessible areas are subject to infestation or damage from wood destroying organisms. The inspector does not move furnishings, stored items, debris, floor or wall coverings, insulation, or other materials as part of the inspection, nor perform destructive testing. Wood destroying organisms may infest, reinfest or become active at anytime. No warranty is provided as part of this inspection.
    Limitations: This report only includes findings from accessible and visible areas on the day of the inspection. In addition to the inaccessible areas documented in this report, examples of other inaccessible areas include: sub areas less than 18 inches in height; attic areas less than five feet in height, areas blocked by ducts, pipes or insulation; areas where locks or permanently attached covers prevent access; areas where insulation would be damaged if traversed; areas obscured by vegetation. All inaccessible areas are subject to infestation or damage from wood destroying organisms. The inspector does not move furnishings, stored items, debris, floor or wall coverings, insulation, or other materials as part of the inspection, nor perform destructive testing. Wood destroying organisms may infest, reinfest or become active at anytime. No warranty is provided as part of this inspection.
    82) Safety, Monitor - Mold was noted in various locations most likely due to roof leaks.

    Mold is a microscopic organism. It exists in every home, car, office, and building. There is no state or federal standard that defines what constitutes a high or low level of mold. To know what type or quantity of mold exists in a home, air samples and possibly surface swabs should be taken and submitted for laboratory analysis. A visual inspection for mold is impossible, it requires a microscope. Even areas that are very suspect to have mold, should be sampled and verified. Mold can be a problem and yet have no visible manifestations. There are more than 100,000 species of mold known to exist; some more harmful than others. Only laboratory analysis can tell what type of mold is present in a home, and its concentration. If any home is tested for mold, it will be found. However, that does not necessarily mean it is a problem.
    Different people have different levels of tolerance for mold. In general, the young, the elderly, persons having allergies, and persons with respiratory difficulties are more susceptible to issues with mold. You can visit www.EPA.gov/mold for much more information.
    If mold is a problem in a home, it can be remedied. However, the company hired to test for mold before and after remediation, should never be the same company hired to do the remediation or clean-up. That would be a conflict of interest.

    Photo 75  
    Building #1.

    Photo 180  
    Building #6.

    83) - Many buildings had wood destroying insect damage. There was quite a few locations with carpenter bee damage. Carpenter ants were noted in some locations. A pest control company should be retained to treat the entire property for wood destroying insects along with the vermin infestations noted.

    Photo 49  
    Carpenter bee infestation and wood damage.

    Photo 116  
    Carpenter ants were noted in numerous locations. This photo is from building #7, but carpenter ant activity was noted in numerous locations and pest control operator should be retained to treat the entire property.

    Photo 174  
    Carpenter bee infestation and wood damage.

    Photo 201  
    Carpenter bee infestation and wood damage.

    Photo 212  
    Carpenter bee infestation and wood damage.
     
     
     
    Septic System Evaluation Return to table of contents

    84) Comment - The septic system was not within the scope of this inspection and no information is offered.

    A septic service company should be retained to determine the condition and operation of the system.
     
     
    Perspective Summary Return to table of contents
    Perspective Summery: The Buildings In Perspective

    While we look for significant issues and deficiencies, another part of our job consists of providing basic factual information to the client. Often, this factual information, when put in perspective, provides valuable insight into the condition of the buildings.

    We provide facts to the client. Sometimes these facts and descriptions disclose obvious deficiencies at the property or the buildings, such as leaking pipes. Other times the facts might be as basic as describing the materials used in the construction of the buildings: the driveway is gravel; the sidewalk is concrete; the heating system is new, propane and 80% efficient; the home has a septic tank; the water comes from a well; the shingles are architectural grade composition material and so forth. On other occasions, we might provide interpretations of the facts, such as explaining why a certain deficiency is a significant problem and not merely a trivial annoyance.

    It is not unusual to find that providing the facts will disclose a deficiency, even if other obvious problems are not readily apparent. As an example, old knob and tube wiring (pre-1950's) is a safety concern that makes a buildings harder or more costly to insure. Old galvanized steel pipes, used as supply pipes or for drain systems, are of such an age that they are currently past their design lives. Whether these old steel pipes are rusted, leaking or in good condition at the time of the inspection, anyone buying a building with pipes of this vintage should be told that the plumbing will need an upgrade in the not too distant future.

    On the other hand we have the responsibility to point out items in the building that would be considered above that of the typical or average building. That may be a 200 ampere electric service where a 100 ampere system would be expected. A high efficiency heating system; a greater amount of insulation then code calls for; granite kitchen counter tops; a higher level of trim and finishing. Etc.

    Any inspector, who does not provide essential information on the systems, components and materials found at the home, is not a thorough professional and is not doing a quality job that serves the best interests of his or her clients.

    With all the information provided we look at a building in perspective to its peers. That is we compare that 1950 brick building to other buildings of the same type and age.
    This property in perspective would be considered to be:

    Electric: Average
    Water Heater: Average
    Perspective Summery: The buildings In Perspective While we look for significant issues and deficiencies, another part of our job consists of providing basic factual information to the client. Often, this factual information, when put in perspective, provides valuable insight into the condition of the home. We provide facts to the client. Sometimes these facts and descriptions disclose obvious deficiencies at the property or the home, such as leaking pipes. Other times the facts might be as basic as describing the materials used in the construction of the home: the driveway is gravel; the sidewalk is concrete; the heating system is new, propane and 80% efficient; the home has a septic tank; the water comes from a well; the shingles are architectural grade composition material and so forth. On other occasions, we might provide interpretations of the facts, such as explaining why a certain deficiency is a significant problem and not merely a trivial annoyance. It is not unusual to find that providing the facts will disclose a deficiency, even if other obvious problems are not readily apparent. As an example, old knob and tube wiring (pre-1950's) is a safety concern that makes a home harder or more costly to insure. Old galvanized steel pipes, used as supply pipes or for drain systems, are of such an age that they are currently past their design lives. Whether these old steel pipes are rusted, leaking or in good condition at the time of the inspection, anyone buying a home with pipes of this vintage should be told that the plumbing will need an upgrade in the not too distant future. On the other hand we have the responsibility to point out items in the home that would be considered above that of the typical or average home. That may be a 200 ampere electric service where a 100 ampere system would be expected. A high efficiency heating system; a greater amount of insulation then code calls for; granite kitchen counter tops; a higher level of trim and finishing. Etc.Any home inspector, who does not provide essential information on the systems, components and materials found at the home, is not a thorough professional and is not doing a quality job that serves the best interests of his or her clients.With all the information provided we look at a house in perspective to its peers. That is we compare that 1950 brick ranch to other homes of the same type and age. We never compare new homes to old homes, etc.This home in perspective would be considered to be:
    Grounds: Average
    Exterior / Foundation: Below Average
    Roof / Attic: Below Average
    Plumbing / Fuel: Below Average
    Electric: Average
    Water Heater: Average
    Heating: Average
    Fireplace / Chimneys: Average
    Bathroom / Laundry: Average
    Interior: Average
    Well:
     
     
    Additional Inspection Pictures Return to table of contents

    85) - The pictures below are additional inspection pictures.
     

    Photo 2  
    Exterior debris around building #8.

    Photo 3  
    Rear / side view of building #8.

    Photo 33  
    Connection point for the propane tank servicing building #1.

    Photo 34  
    Front of the pump house.

    Photo 40  
    Side view of the pump house.

    Photo 51  
    Exterior of building #1 showing the bell tower.

    Photo 62  
    The interior of building #1.

    Photo 63  
    The interior of building #1.

    Photo 65  
    The interior of building #1.

    Photo 94  
    Interior of building #9.

    Photo 96  
    Interior of building #9.

    Photo 97  
    Interior of building #9.

    Photo 100  
    Building #9.

    Photo 103  
    Interior building #8.

    Photo 104  
    Interior building #8.

    Photo 106  
    Front view building #7.

    Photo 120  
    Maintain, scrape and paint the emergency escape stairs on building #7.

    Photo 125  
    Side view building #7 showing the shower room extension.

    Photo 126  
    The pool was winterized and covered. The pool and associated pool equipment were not inspected.

    Photo 127  
    Pool pump equipment.

    Photo 128  
    Pool shed.

    Photo 129  
    Rear view building #9.

    Photo 150  
    Building #3.

    Photo 157  
    The office space in building #3.

    Photo 161  
    Front view building #5.

    Photo 170  
    Front view building #6.

    Photo 197  
    Front view building #5.

    Photo 200  
    Front view of building #2.

    Photo 205  
    Laundry room building #2.

    Photo 210  
    Rear view of building #2.

    Photo 218  
    Front view of building #5.

    Photo 240  
     

     
    HomePro Inspections c 2008