Website: http://homeiu.com
Email: homeiu@tusco.net
Phone: (740) 254-4663
160 Kennedy Dr. 
Gnadenhutten,Ohio 44629
Inspector: Marcus Sellards

Your default report title here...Leesville
Client(s): Jim Shoaff
Property address: 144 concord, Leesville, Ohio
Inspection date: Wednesday, March 29, 2006
This report published on 3/30/2006 10:16:46 AM EST

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.


How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas. Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and shown in bold type. Items of concern follow descriptive information and are shown as follows:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major defectCorrection could involve a major repair expense or replacement 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor defectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a qualified specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 
Concern items are sorted by the types listed above.  Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
SHED/GARAGE
Electric service
Water heater
Plumbing and laundry
Crawl space
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Bedroom
Living/Family room


General information Return to table of contents  
Report number: 1111
Structures inspected: House/Cabin, Well house, Shed
Type of building: Single familyBungalow Cabin/a-frame
Age of building: 35+ years
Property owner's name: Jim Shoaff
Time started: 10:15 am
Time finished: 2:45 am
Inspection Fee: $295.00
Payment method: Check#1363
Present during inspection: Not present
Occupied: No, but furnishings and stored items are present
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Damp
Front of structure faces: Southfro inpestion purposes, front door faces South
Main entrance faces: South
Foundation type: Crawlspace, Post and pier
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Security system, Irrigation system, Private well, Water filtration system
Overall condition: Overall apperance and condition af residence appeared to be in good condition. There are some fire, health and safety issues that require further evaluation of qualified person or persons.
1) Many wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by large amounts of furniture and/or stored items. Many areas couldn't be evaluated.
2) Some or all sections of this property's plumbing system were"winterized" at the time of the inspection. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the plumbing system and fixtures, such as toilets, faucets and sinks.
3) The water service wasn't turned on during the inspection. As a result, plumbing supply, drain and waste lines, fixtures, and some appliances such as water heaters weren't fully evaluated.
 
Exterior Return to table of contents  
Footing material: None
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete, Concrete block
Foundation material: Oured cement and cement block
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood panels
Driveway material: Gravel, Dirt
Sidewalk material: None
Exterior door material: Wood panel
4) Guardrails are missing from one or more sections of the front porch or elevated surfaces with high drop-offs. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. Standard building practices require guardrails to be installed at drop-offs higher than 30 inches, but in some cases it is advised to install them at shorter drop-offs. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install guardrails as necessary and as per standard building practices.

Location: front porch.

Photo 4  
 
5) One or more light fixtures located in "wet" or "damp" locations have no visible rating for use in wet locations. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and replace light fixtures as necessary and as per standard building practices.

Located in the well house.
6) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

Location: Outside well house fuse box and tank.

Photo 11  
 
7) The deck is unstable in one or more areas due to lack of diagonal bracing. This is a safety hazard since severe movement may cause the railing to collapse. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

Photo 8  
 
8) Water supply pipes are routed outside and are subject to freezing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) if inside shut-off valves exist for these supply pipes. If unable to determine if shut-off valve(s) exist, or if none do, then a qualified plumber should evaluate and install interior shut-off valves as necessary to prevent pipes from freezing and bursting.

Location: southeast corner of home.

Photo 13  
 
9) One or more large trees are very close the foundation. Tree roots can cause significant structural damage to foundations. Recommend having a qualified tree service contractor or arborist remove trees as necessary to prevent damage to the structure's foundation.

Photo 6  
 
10) The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.

Photo 2  
 
11) One or more downspouts are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should install downspout(s) where missing. Also recommend installing extensions such as splashblocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines as necessary to carry rainwater away from the house.
12) One or more gutters are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should install gutters and downspouts where missing. Also, extensions such as splashblocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines should be installed as necessary to carry rain water away from the house.

Photo 3  
 
13) One or more crawl space vent screens are missing. Animals such as vermin or pets may enter the crawl space and nest, die and/or leave feces and urine. A qualified contractor should install screens where missing using screen material such as "hardware cloth" with 1/4 inch minimum gaps.

Location: East side of house.
14) One or more wooden deck support posts are in contact with soil. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. However no damage from wood destroying insects or organisms was found. Standard building practices require that there be at least 6" of space between any wood and the soil below, even if the wood is treated. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. Otherwise recommend installing borate based Impel rods to prevent rot.

Photo 5  
 
15) One or more moderate cracks (1/8 inch to 3/4 inch) were found in the foundation. These may be a structural concern, or an indication that settlement is ongoing. The client(s) should consider hiring qualified contractors and/or engineers as necessary for further evaluation. Such contractors may include:

These were located at the supporting cement blocks which are also starting to lean outward.


  • Foundation repair contractors who may prescribe repairs, and will give cost estimates for prescribed repairs
  • Masonry contractors who repair and/or replace brick veneer
  • Geotechnical engineers who attempt to determine if settlement is ongoing, and what the cause of the settlement is
  • Structural engineers who determine if repairs are necessary, and prescribe those repairs

    At a minimum, recommend sealing cracks to prevent water infiltration. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.

    Photo 9  
     
  • 16) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

    Location: West side of deck.
    17) Window glazing putty at one or more windows is missing and/or deteriorated. Putty should be replaced and/or installed where necessary. For more information on replacing window putty, visit: http://www.oldhouseweb.com/stories/Detailed/12216.shtml
    18) Recommend cleaning deck(s) and railing(s) and treating with a preservative claiming to waterproof, block ultraviolet light, and stop mildew. Consumer Reports recommends these products:

  • Cabot Decking Stain and PTW Stain
  • Olympic Water Repellent Deck Stain
  • Thompson's House and Deck Stain
  • Wolman PTW Deck Stain
  • Akzo Sikkens Cetol DEK
  • Benjamin Moore Moorwood Clear Wood Finish
  • DAP Woodlife Premium
  • Olympic Natural Look Protector Plus
  • 19) Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit The Ins and Outs of Caulking.
    20) One or more outside faucets were not evaluated due to their being winterized with covers, and are excluded from this inspection.
     
    Roof Return to table of contents  
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Gable, A-frame
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 8-12 years
    Gutter & downspout material: None
    Roof ventilation: Unable to determine (no access to attic spaces)
    21) One or more "rubber boot" flashings are lifting at the base or are improperly installed so that water or vermin intrusion may occur. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary, such as permanently fastening down the lifted edge(s), or reinstalling flashings.
    22) Debris such as leaves, needles, seeds, etc. have accumulated on the roof. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since water may not flow easily off the roof, and may enter gaps in the roof surface. Leaks may occur as a result. Debris should be cleaned from the roof now and as necessary in the future.

    Photo 1  
     
    23) Moss is growing on the roof. As a result, shingles may lift or be damaged. Leaks may result and/or the roof surface may fail prematurely. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Efforts should be taken to kill the moss during its growing season (wet months). Typically zinc-based chemicals are used for this, and must be applied periodically. For information on various moss treatment products and their pros and cons, visit http://bryophytes.science.oregonstate.edu/page24.htm.
    24) Trees are overhanging roof and are within 10 feet of roof vertically. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since organic debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate on the roof surface. Accumulated debris may cause water to enter gaps in the roof surface and leak into attic and/or interior spaces. Trees should be pruned so they are at least 10 feet above roof, or don't overhang the roof.
    25) The roof was partially obscured by accumulated debris and couldn't be fully evaluated.

    Photo 3  
     
     
    SHED/GARAGE Return to table of contents  
    26) Supports posts are in direct contact with the ground and are subect to rot and pest infiltraation.

    Photo 7  
     
    27) Much of the garage, include areas around the interior perimeter and in the center are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents  
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers, Fuses
    Service amperage (amps): 100
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: West wall of bedroom
    Location of sub panels: West wall of bedroom
    Location of main disconnect: No single main disconnect, use all breakers in main service panel
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
    Service entrance conductor material: Copper
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soillocated unser deck at west side of house
    Branch circuit wiring type: Copper
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: Can't verify
    Branch circuit wiring type: Copper
    Smoke detectors present: No
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: Can't verify
    28) The service panel in the outside well house is unsafe and rusted. This a potential fire hazard. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair if necessary.

    Photo 10  

    Photo 11  

    Photo 12  
     
    29) The service drop wires are less than 12 feet above the driveway. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician and/or the utility company should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 1  
     
    30) Inadequate working space exists for the sub-panel. Standard building practices require the following clearances:

  • An area 30 inches wide by 3 feet deep exists in front of the panel
  • The panel is at least 5 1/2 feet above the floor
  • There is at least 6 feet 6 inches of headroom in front of the panel
  • The wall below the panel is clear to the floor

    A qualified contractor and/or electrician should evaluate and make modifications as necessary.
  • 31) The electric service to this property appears to be rated at substantially less than 200 amps, and may be inadequate for the client(s) needs. Recommend consulting with a qualified electrician about upgrading to a 200 amp service.
    32) The sub-panel couldn't not be evaluated properly due to lack of access from walls encasing the panel to closely.. This panel wasn't fully evaluated. Repairs should be made so the panel cover can be easily removed.
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents  
    Estimated age: 10+ years
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Electricity
    Capacity (in gallons): 30
    Manufacturer: U.S. Craftmaster
    Model: E1E33LD0454
    33) Corrosion was found in one or more areas on the water heater. The water heater may be failing. A qualified plumbing contractor should evaluate and replace or repair water heater if necessary.
    34) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. The inspector was unable to determine the age of the water heater due to the manufacturer's label being obscured, no serial number being visible, or the serial number not clearly indicating the age. The clients should be aware that this water heater may be near, at, or beyond its useful life and may need replacing at any time. Recommend attempting to determine the water heater's age, and budgeting for a replacement if necessary.
    35) The water heater was turned off at the time of the inspection. For example, circuit breaker turned off, gas supply turned off or pilot light turned off. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the water heater.
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents  
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Under south side of house and in well house
    Water service: Private
    Service pipe material: Galvanized steel, Lead
    Vent pipe material: Not visible
    Drain pipe material: Plastic
    Waste pipe material: Plastic
    36) Copper water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:

  • Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than six hours.
  • Install appropriate filters at points of use.
  • Use only cold water for cooking and drinking. Hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water.
  • Use bottled or distilled water.
  • Treat well water to make it less corrosive.
  • Have a qualified plumbing contractor replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components as necessary.

    For more information visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html and http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html
  • 37) Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
      38) Water was turned off or winterized not allowing for a proper inspection of said items.
     
    Crawl space Return to table of contents  
    Inspection method: Partially traversed
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Concrete, Masonry
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    Vapor barrier present: Not visible
    39) Standing water was found in one or more sections of the crawl space. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the crawl space. A qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in crawl spaces include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter crawl spaces, but if water must be controlled after it enters the crawl space, then typical repairs include installing trenches, drains and/or sump pump(s) in the crawl space.
  • 40) No vapor barrier is installed in some areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should install a vapor barrier where missing. Standard building practices require the following:

  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

    Better building practices require that:

  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.
  • 41) No insulation under floor in crawl space in some areas. Recommend that a qualified contractor install R19 or better (6" thick fiberglass batt) insulation below floor where missing for energy efficiency.
    42) Water supply pipes are uninsulated. Recommend insulating pipes as necessary for better energy efficiency and to prevent water pipes from freezing.
    43) Large tree roots are growing underneath the southeast crawl space entrance. This could lead to problems with support members shifting and waste pipe clogging.

    Photo 14  

    Photo 15  
    44) Cellulose-based debris such as wood scraps, form wood, cardboard and/or paper were found in crawl space. All cellulose-based debris should be removed to avoid attracting wood destroying insects.
    45) Some crawl space areas were inaccessible due to low height (less than 18 inches), ductwork or pipes blocking, standing water, and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents  
    : Water was turned off not allowing for proper inspection of kitchen.
    46) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    47) The refrigerator, stove and oven all operated properly.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents  
    : Water was turned off not allowing a complete inspection of the bathroom.
    48) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    49) One or more bathrooms with a shower do not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.
     
    Bedroom Return to table of contents  
    50) No smoke alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. A qualified electrician should install smoke alarms as per standard building practices (functioning one exists in hallways leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom, etc.). For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
    51) One or more rooms that are considered living spaces appear to have no visible source of heat. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) regarding this, and if necessary, a qualified contractor should evaluate and install heat source(s) as necessary.
    52) Due to furniture being present, some areas of the bedroom were not visible.
     
    Living/Family room Return to table of contents  
    53) Extension cords are being used as permanent wiring in one or more areas. They should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring poses a fire and shock hazard, and is an indication that wiring is inadequate and should be updated. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure, resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, and sparks that could start a fire. Extension cords should be removed as necessary, or a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install additional circuits and/or electric receptacles.
    54) No smoke alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. A qualified electrician should install smoke alarms as per standard building practices (functioning one exists in hallways leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom, etc.). For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
    55) Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.
    56) Screen(s) in one or more windows are torn or have holes in them. Screens should be replaced where necessary.
    57) One or more rooms that are considered living spaces appear to have no visible source of heat. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) regarding this, and if necessary, a qualified contractor should evaluate and install heat source(s) as necessary.
     
    Heating and Cooling
    Carpenter Heating 330-308-8550 946 cookson ave, Dover
    Dover-Phila heating 330-343-5511 133 w 3rd st Dover

    Materials
    Lowe's 330-339-1936 495 mill ave se, New Phila
    Lincoln's and Things 888-269-3635 20 church st, Sherrodsville (Bob Stratton)

    Plumbing
    Peterman plumbing and heating 330-364-4497 525 w 15th st, Dover
    Yoder Plumbing 330-343-0352 318 w 5th, Dover (Gary Yoder)

    Electricians
    Korns Electric330-364-1415 101 N Northwood dr, Dover (Tony Korns)
    Bailey Electric Inc. 330-602-5195 Dover (Chad Bailey)

    Timber co.
    Stony Point Logging 330-852-4512 7842 stony point rd, Sugarcreek

    Tree removal
    Harold Lute 330-343-1423 5506 Depot st. Roswell (Harold)

    General Help with stripping paneling etc. Roll off container for debris.
    Marcus Sellards-740-254-4663