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Hero Inspections & Environmental


3580 Smuggler Cir 
Boulder CO 80305-7220
Inspector: Annette Mack

    

Pre-Purchase Site Inspection Report

Client(s):  Jason Entenmann
Property address:  6523 Tapadero Pl
Castle Pines CO 80108
Inspection date:  Monday, August 07, 2017

This report published on Wednesday, August 09, 2017 2:04:48 PM MDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a health and/or safety hazard
Concern typeMaterial DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeNuisanceCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeCommentFor your information

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
BuildFax
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Electric service
Plumbing and laundry
Heating and cooling
Water heater
Kitchen
Interior Rooms
Master Bedroom
Bedrooms
Master Bathroom
Second Floor Bathroom(s)
Basement Bathroom(s)
Attic
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Finished Basement
Basement
Thermal Imaging
Sewer Scope
HERO Inspection Summary
Radon
NACHI Standards of Practice

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General information
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Inspector's name: David Mack
Inspection Start Time: 9:00
Building Type: Single Family
Year Built: 2003
Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Cloudy, Rain
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Damp
Front of structure faces: South
Main entrance faces: South
Foundation type: Unfinished basement, Finished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Irrigation system
NACHI: The International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI) promotes a high standard of professionalism, business ethics and inspection procedures. InterNACHI members subscribe to the following Code of Ethics in the course of their business. Duty to the PublicThe InterNACHI member shall abide by the Code of Ethics and substantially follow the InterNACHI Standards of Practice. The InterNACHI member shall not engage in any practices that could be damaging to the public or bring discredit to the home inspection industry. The InterNACHI member shall be fair, honest, impartial, and act in good faith in dealing with the public. The InterNACHI member shall not discriminate in any business activities on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, familial status, sexual orientation or handicap, and shall comply with all applicable federal, state and local laws concerning discrimination. The InterNACHI member shall be truthful regarding his/her services and qualifications. The InterNACHI member shall have no undisclosed conflict of interest with the client, nor shall the InterNACHI member accept or offer any undisclosed commissions, rebates, profits or other benefit, nor shall the InterNACHI member accept or offer any disclosed or undisclosed commissions, rebates, profits or other benefit from real estate agents, brokers or any third parties having financial interest in the sale of the property, nor shall the InterNACHI member offer or provide any disclosed or undisclosed financial compensation directly or indirectly to any real estate agent, real estate broker or real estate company for referrals or for inclusion on lists of preferred and/or affiliated inspectors or inspection companies. The InterNACHI member shall not communicate any information about an inspection to anyone except the client without the prior written consent of the client, except where it may affect the safety of others, or violates a law or statute. The InterNACHI member shall always act in the interest of the client, unless doing so violates a law, statute or this Code of Ethics. The InterNACHI member shall use a written contract that specifies the services to be performed, limitations of services, and fees. The InterNACHI member shall comply with all government rules and licensing requirements of the jurisdiction where he/she conducts business. The InterNACHI member shall not perform or offer to perform, for an additional fee, any repairs or repair-associated services to the structure on which the member or member's company has prepared a home inspection report for a period of 12 months. This provision shall not include services to components and/or systems that are not included in the InterNACHI Standards of Practice. Duty to Continue EducationThe InterNACHI member shall comply with InterNACHI's current Continuing Education requirements. The InterNACHI member shall pass the InterNACHI's Online Inspector Exam once every calendar year. Duty to the Profession and InterNACHIThe InterNACHI member shall strive to improve the home inspection industry by sharing his/her lessons and/or experiences for the benefit of all. This does not preclude the member from copyrighting or marketing his/her expertise to other inspectors or the public in any manner permitted by law. The InterNACHI member shall assist the InterNACHI leadership in disseminating and publicizing the benefits of InterNACHI membership. The InterNACHI member shall not engage in any act or practice that could be deemed damaging, seditious or destructive to InterNACHI, fellow InterNACHI members, InterNACHI employees, leadership or directors. Member(s) accused of acting or deemed in violation of such rules shall be reviewed by the Ethics committee for possible sanctions and/or expulsion from InterNACHI.

1) This residence has standing water, signs of previous water intrusion and signs of potential fungal growth. While testing area like the crawl space or the attic for mold isn't necessary since it isn't considered an indoor living space, it is possible that the mold growth can cause elevated airborne fungal spores finding their way into the interior of the house.

You should consider having the house evaluated for elevated mold levels with indoor air samples. HERO Inspections & Engineering Services offers this service at a discounted rate for people who had their site inspection performed by the same.

Elevated Moisture Levels: First floor kitchen sink cabinet

Previous Water Damage: First floor kitchen sink cabinet

Potential Fungal Growth: First floor kitchen sink cabinet

2) We are proud of our service, and trust you will be happy with the quality of our report. We have made every effort to provide you with an accurate assessment of the condition of the property and its components and alert you to any significant defects or adverse conditions. However, we may not have tested every outlet, opened every window or door, or identified every problem. Also because our inspection is essentially visual, latent defect could exist. We can not see behind walls. Therefore, you should not regard our inspection as a guarantee or warranty, although we offer our clients limited warranties and guarantees with every inspection. This report is simply a report on the general condition of a property at a given point in time. As a homeowner, you should expect potential problems to occur. Roofs will leak, basements may have water problems and systems may fail without warning. We can not predict future events. For these reasons, you should always keep a comprehensive insurance policy current.
You are advised to seek two professional opinions and and acquire estimates of repair as to any defects, comments, improvements or recommendations mentioned in this report. We recommend that the professional making any repairs inspect the property further, in order to discover and repair related problems that were not identified in this report. We recommend that all repairs, corrections and cost estimates be completed and documented prior to closing or purchasing the property. Feel free to hire other professionals to inspect the property prior to closing, including, HVAC, electricians, engineers and roofers, especially if you are concerned about all previous work being done up to current building and safety codes.

3) Some wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by furniture and/or stored items. Some areas couldn't be evaluated.

4) The walk-through prior to closing is the time for the client. Conditions can change between the time of the a home inspection and the time of closing. Restrictions that existed during the inspection may have been removed for the walk-through. Defects or problems that were no found during the home inspection may be discovered during the walk-through. The client should be thorough during the walk-through.

And defect or problem discovered during the walk-through should be negotiated with the owner/seller of the property prior to closing. Purchasing the property with a known defect or problem releases the seller of all responsibility. Client assumes responsibility for all known defects after settlement.

The following are recommendations for the pre-closing walk-through of our new house. Consider hiring a certified home inspector to assist you:

1. Check the heating and cooling system. Turn the thermostat to heat mode and turn the temperature setting up. Confirm that the heating system is running and making heat. Turn the thermostat off and wait 20 minutes. If above 60f, turn the thermostat to cool mode and turn the thermostat setting down. Confirm the condenser is spinning and the system is making cool air.
2. Operate all appliances.
3. Run water at all fixtures and flush toilets. Look for plumbing leaks.
4. Operate all exterior doors, windows, and locks.
5. Test smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.
6. Ask for all remote controls to any garage door openers, fans, gas fireplaces, etc.
7. Inspect areas that may have been restricted at the time of the inspection, but are no longer restricted.

BuildFax
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What is Build Fax?: BuildFax is a 3rd party information source for your home. Buildfax is a company that collects and organizes construction records on over 70 million properties across the United States. They collect data on new construction, major system repairs, additions, renovations, roofs, pools, demolitions, contractors and more. Think - Carfax, but for your house. While this information is considered accurate, it is possible that it may not be complete from time to time. Consider this one of the potential resources to learn as much as possible about your future home.

5) This report documents recorded construction activity related to this property as recorded by local permitting authorities, and includes information on contractors, potential risk factors, and other points of interest:

https://delivery.buildfax.com/reports/files/BuildFaxReport_20170807111309419255-MLDXV5-147088898.html

6) DETAILED PROPERTY IMPROVEMENT HISTORY:

https://delivery.buildfax.com/reports/files/BuildFaxReport_20170807111313065952-I1K686-147088909.html

Exterior
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Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Composition wood clapboard, Brick veneer, Stucco
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core steel

7) Guardrails are loose and/or wobbly in one or more areas. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as installing new fasteners or hardware, installing additional fasteners and/or installing additional railing components as necessary so they are securely attached.
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8) One or more outdoor electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all outdoor receptacles within six feet six inches of ground level have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
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9) Stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed. This is a potential safety hazard for people with mobility issues. Consider having a qualified contractor install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing,.
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10) The exterior gas lines are currently corroded. They should be sanded and painted. Too much corrosion can lead to a leak. A combustible gas detetector detected the presence of gas at the meter at the time of inspection. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make any necessary repairs.
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11) One or more wall-mounted exterior light fixtures have wiring that's subject to water intrusion due to caulk not being installed around the light fixture's back plate. Caulk should be applied around the perimeter of back plates where missing. A gap should be left at the bottom for condensation to drain out.
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12) Rot was found in one or more areas on fascia/trim boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.
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13) Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.
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14) Soffit boards are damaged or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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15) Gaps exist in the siding or at one or more openings around the exterior, where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by pests/vermin.
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16) One or more outside faucets aren't anchored securely to the structure's exterior. Fasteners should be tightened, installed, or replaced as necessary so faucets are securely anchored to prevent stress on plumbing supply lines and possible leaks.
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17) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) and/or cosmetic blemishes were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply).
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair).
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18) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
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19) This property is clad with composition wood fiber siding. Many brands of this type of siding are known to deteriorate and/or fail prematurely due to moisture penetration, failure is typically visible in the form of swelling, cracking and delamination, especially at the bottom edges.

Some areas of siding on this structure show the symptoms described above, but it appears that the siding hasn't deteriorated to the point of needing replacement. Some manufacturers (Louisiana Pacific) recommend a repair process for this siding where affected areas are sealed with "Permanizer Plus", a flexible primer made by Pittsburgh Paint, followed by two coats of 100% acrylic latex paint. This sealant must be applied to the bottom edges using a brush. The face of the siding can be sprayed. The "Permanizer Plus" sealer isn't required for edges that aren't swollen, cracked or deteriorated but the acrylic latex should still be brushed on these edges.

When it is time to repaint recommend having a qualified contractor seal and repaint as described above, or by other methods specified by the siding manufacturer. The client(s) may wish to have a qualified contractor evaluate further to determine if some or all of the siding should be replaced.

For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=permanizer+plus
http://www.siding4u.com/failing_siding_help.htm
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20) Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit:
The Ins and Outs of Caulking.
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21) The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.
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22) Minor cracks were found in the stucco finish. Recommend sealing these areas to prevent future moisture intrusion.
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23) Minor cracks and/or cosmetic blemishes were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is required, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons and to prevent future damage due to water intrusion, heaving or undermining. Recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration or at a minimum monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply).
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair).
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24) Minor cracks were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is required, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons and to prevent future damage due to water intrusion, heaving or undermining. Recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration or at a minimum monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply).
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair).
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25)   Several openings to the basement windows are open, have large drop-offs and pose a safety concern if someone were to trip and fall. These should be covered.
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Roof
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Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars, Viewed from windows
Roof type: Gable
Roof covering: Clay tile
Estimated Year of Install: 2003
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Adequate

26) One or more roofing tiles are chipped and/or cracked. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and replace tiles as necessary.
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27) Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.
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28) Because of the roof covering type and/or the configuration of the roof, the inspector was unable to traverse the roof and wasn't able to fully evaluate the entire roof.
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29)   We are not licensed roofing contractors. Feel free to hire one prior to closing. We do our best to inspection the roof system within the time alloted. We inspect the roof covering, drainage system, the flashings, the skylights, and other installed accessories. We are not required to inspect antennae, interiors of flues or chimneys which are not readily accessible. This is not an exhaustive inspection of every installation detail of the roofing system according to manufacturers specification and local building codes.

Garage
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Garage Door Power: Electric Power

30) The vehicle door is difficult or unable to open or close. The button must be held down to get the door to close. Vehicle doors should open and close smoothly and easily, and with a single press of the operator button. This could be related to the photo eye safety sensors. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

The safety features for this door were not able to be tested at the time of inspection as a result of the door not functioning properly.
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31) The infrared "photo eye" devices that trigger the vehicle door opener's auto-reverse feature are located higher than 4 to 6 inches from the floor. This is a potential safety hazard. A qualified contractor should relocate these devices so they're 4 to 6 inches from the floor. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html
http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html
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32) Weatherstrip at the sides and/or bottom of the vehicle door is damaged and/or deteriorated. It should be replaced where necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.
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33) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
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34) Due to much of the garage, including areas around the interior perimeter and in the center having stored items access was limited and not all areas were visible.
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35)   One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) and/or cosmetic blemishes were found in the floor/foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply).
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair).
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Electric service
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Primary service type: Underground
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 200
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: Exterior East Elevation
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed

36) One or more arc fault circuit breakers may be recalled, based on their having a blue test button. This may be a safety hazard for shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and replace circuit breakers if necessary. For more information visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml05/05035.html
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37) The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in the main service panel is missing, unreadable or incomplete. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
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38) The interior of the panel has signs of animal/insects. Even if dead, these items can be considered combustible and should be removed by an electrician.
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Plumbing and laundry
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Water pressure (psi): 55
Location of main water shut-off valve: Basement access hatch
Location of main fuel shut-off: Exterior East Elevation
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Copper
Supply pipe material: Copper
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Plastic

39) The clothes dryer exhaust duct appears to need cleaning. Significant amounts of lint build up was found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire from decreased air flow. This duct should be cleaned now and annually, or more often if necessary in the future. Some chimney sweeps or heating/cooling duct cleaners perform this service. For more information, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html
http://chimneykeepers.com/dryerclean.html
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40) The clothes dryer exhaust duct is broken or disconnected in one or more places. Clothes dryers produce large amounts of moisture which should not enter structure interiors. Damage to building components may result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html
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41) The washing machine is installed over a finished living space and has no catch pan or drain installed. These are not commonly installed, but they are recommended to prevent water damage to finished interior spaces below if or when the washing machine leaks, overflows or is drained. Recommend having a qualified contractor install both a catch pan and drain.
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42) The drain pipes that come with the drain assembly utilize a static force to hold the pipes in place versus threading with plumbers tape to make a water tight seal. The pipes can loosen over time and this could lead to eventual leaks. Have a plumber evaluate and make necessary repairs.
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43) A sump pump is installed on the premises. This may indicate that water accumulates inside or below the structure. Recommend asking the property owners how often the sump pump operates and for how long at different times of the year. Also, the clients should be aware that the service life of most sump pumps is between five and seven years, and that the pump may need replacing soon depending on its age and how much it operates.
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44) Stored items made it difficult to fully inspect under the sink.
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Heating and cooling
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Estimated age: 2002
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air
Primary A/C energy source: Natural Gas
Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
Manufacturer: Carrier
Filter location: In return air duct below furnace
Thermostat Location: Main hall

45) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
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46) Combustible materials were found near areas of the HVAC that get very hot. This presents a fire hazard. Always keep dangerous and combustible materials away from gas appliances.
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47) The furnace worked adequately during the inspection but the estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years This furnace appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
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48) The estimated useful life for air conditioning compressors is 8 to 15 years. This unit appears to have exceeded this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
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49) Insulation for the outside condensing unit's refrigerant lines is damaged, deteriorated and/or missing in one or more areas. This may result in reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should replace insulation as necessary.
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50) The last service date of this system appears to be more than two years ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than two years ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed every few years in the future, or as per the contractor's recommendations.
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51) Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.
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52) Air handler filter(s) should be checked monthly in the future and replaced or washed as necessary.

53) We are not licensed HVAC or Steam & Boiler contractors. We recommend you hire one to further evaluate the internal components and building codes for the most recent installation, especially if there are concerns or if the system is older. We do our best to inspection the heating & cooling system within the time allotted. We are not required to inspect internal components which are not readily accessible. This is not an exhaustive inspection of every installation detail of the heating & cooling system according to manufacturers specification and local building codes.

54) Furnace Model Number
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55) Air Conditioner Model Number
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Water heater
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Estimated age: 2003
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): 50
Manufacturer: State

56) The hot water temperature is greater than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of scalding. The thermostat should be adjusted so the water temperature doesn't exceed 120 degrees. For more information on scalding dangers, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5098.html
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57) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
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58) Water stains were found below the water heater. This may be a sign that the water heater is failing. A qualified plumbing contractor should evaluate and replace or repair the water heater if necessary.
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59) Corrosion was found on fittings and/or water supply lines for the water heater. Leaks may exist. A qualified plumbing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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60) Water Heater Model Number
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Kitchen
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61) One or more electric receptacles have reverse-polarity wiring, where the hot and neutral wires are reversed. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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62) One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric receptacles did not trip when tested with the inspector's test instrument. These devices should trip when tested with a test instrument in addition to tripping via the test buttons on the receptacles. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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63) One or more sink drains have an active leak. For example, at pipe fittings and/or junctions between pipe and sink. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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64) The drain pipes that come with the drain assembly utilize a static force to hold the pipes in place versus threading with plumbers tape to make a water tight seal. The pipes can loosen over time and this could lead to eventual leaks. Have a plumber evaluate and make necessary repairs.
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65) Caulk and grout are missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk & grout should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.
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Photo 65-2
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Photo 65-3
 

66) The light in range hood is inoperable. Recommend replacing light bulb(s) or having repairs made by a qualified contractor as necessary.
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Photo 66-1
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Photo 66-2

67) Minor damage and/or deterioration was found at countertops in one or more areas. The client(s) should evaluate and consider having repairs made, and/or countertops replaced where necessary.
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Photo 67-1
 

68) All the appliances functioned adequately but they are approaching their intended service life of 10 to 15 years. Recommend budgeting for replacements as necessary.
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Photo 68-1
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Photo 68-2
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Photo 68-3
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Photo 68-4
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Photo 68-5
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Photo 68-6

69) Stored items made it difficult to fully inspect under the sink.
Photo
Photo 69-1
 

70) Water stains and/or minor water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below the sink. The client(s) should evaluate and consider having repairs made.
Photo
Photo 70-1
 

Interior Rooms
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71) One or more light fixtures are loose or installed in a substandard way. A qualified contractor or electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so light fixtures are securely mounted and installed in accordance with the manufacturer's installation instructions.
Photo
Photo 71-1
 

72) Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
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Photo 72-1
 

73) Screen(s) in most or all of the windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.
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Photo 73-1
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Photo 73-2

74) One or more interior doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.
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Photo 74-1
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Photo 74-2

75) Trim is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. Recommend having a qualified contractor replace or repair trim as necessary.
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Photo 75-1
 

76) Several interior windows edges have open seams. This can lead to condensation build up and moisture damage. These areas should be sealed and monitored.
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Photo 76-1
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Photo 76-2
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Photo 76-3
 

77) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
Photo
Photo 77-1
 

78) Minor cracks were found in ceilings and/or walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
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Photo 78-1
 

Master Bedroom
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79) The sash spring mechanism(s) in one or more windows are broken or loose. A qualified contractor or service technician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so the window(s) operate as intended (open easily, stay open without support, close easily, etc.).
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Photo 79-1
 

Bedrooms
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80) Minor cracks were found in ceilings and/or walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
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Photo 80-1
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Photo 80-2

Master Bathroom
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81) This bathroom has a shower with no exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.
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Photo 81-1
 

82) The drain pipes that come with the drain assembly utilize a static force to hold the pipes in place versus threading with plumbers tape to make a water tight seal. The pipes can loosen over time and this could lead to eventual leaks. Have a plumber evaluate and make necessary repairs.
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Photo 82-1
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Photo 82-2

83) Caulk is missing or deteriorated along one or more bathtubs, where the tub meets the surround and flooring meets the tub. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the floor structure.
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Photo 83-1
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Photo 83-2

84) Caulk is missing or deteriorated along the base of one or more showers, where flooring meets the shower. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the floor structure.
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Photo 84-1
 

85) Caulk and grout are missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk & grout should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.
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Photo 85-1
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Photo 85-2
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Photo 85-3
 

86) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
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Photo 86-1
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Photo 86-2

87) Stored items made it difficult to fully inspect under the sink.
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Photo 87-1
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Photo 87-2

Second Floor Bathroom(s)
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88) Cover plate(s) are broken at one or more electric boxes, receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be replaced where necessary.
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Photo 88-1
 

89) One or more toilets are loose. A qualified contractor should remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repairs if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking.
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Photo 89-1
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Photo 89-2

90) Tile and/or grout around one or more bathtubs is damaged or deteriorated. For example, deteriorated or missing grout, cracked, missing or loose tiles, etc. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair tile and/or grout as necessary.
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Photo 90-1
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Photo 90-2

91) The shower diverter valve for the bathtub faucet is defective. A significant amount of water comes out of the bathtub spout when the shower is turned on. Water will be wasted as a result. A qualified plumber should evaluate and replace components or make repairs as necessary.
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Photo 91-1
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Photo 91-2

92) Tile, stone and/or grout flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more "wet" areas with a wood subfloor below. The deterioration may allow water intrusion, and may result in damage to the subfloor. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing broken tiles and deteriorated grout, and resealing grout.
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Photo 92-1
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Photo 92-2
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Photo 92-3
 

93) The drain pipes that come with the drain assembly utilize a static force to hold the pipes in place versus threading with plumbers tape to make a water tight seal. The pipes can loosen over time and this could lead to eventual leaks. Have a plumber evaluate and make necessary repairs.
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Photo 93-1
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Photo 93-2
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Photo 93-3
 

94) Caulk is missing or deteriorated along the base of one or more bathtubs, where flooring meets the tub. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the floor structure.
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Photo 94-1
 

95) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
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Photo 95-1
 

96) The enamel coating on one or more bathtubs is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, chipped or worn, and/or rust on some exposed steel. However, no leaks were found due to the deterioration. The client(s) should evaluate to determine if the bathtub(s) should be refinished or replaced.
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Photo 96-1
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Photo 96-2

Basement Bathroom(s)
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97) The drain pipes that come with the drain assembly utilize a static force to hold the pipes in place versus threading with plumbers tape to make a water tight seal. The pipes can loosen over time and this could lead to eventual leaks. Have a plumber evaluate and make necessary repairs.
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Photo 97-1
 

98) Caulk and grout are missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk & grout should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.
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Photo 98-1
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Photo 98-2

99) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
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Photo 99-1
 

Attic
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Inspection method: Viewed from hatch

100) No weatherstrip is installed around the attic access hatch. Weatherstrip should be installed around the hatch to prevent heated interior air from entering attic.
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Photo 100-1
 

Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
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Fireplace type: Metal prefabricated
Chimney type: Metal

101) The glass on one or more gas fireplaces and/or stoves has a hazy film. This is typically a mineral residue left from water vapor as the gas burns. It may be possible to clean this fogging by removing the glass from the fireplace and using a gas appliance ceramic glass cleaner, available through gas fireplace and stove distributors and installers. Ammonia-based products, such as common glass cleaners should not be used since they may cause damage or etching to the glass, or make the haze permanent.

It may be possible for a homeowner to remove the glass for cleaning, depending on if the instructions or manual for the fireplace are available, and if the homeowner is experienced in such repairs. Recommend consulting with a gas fireplace installation contractor for more information, or to have them do the cleaning.
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Photo 101-1
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Photo 101-2

Finished Basement
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102) Handrail(s) at some stairs are loose. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary. For example, installing new fasteners and/or hardware so handrails are securely attached.
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Photo 102-1
 

103) One or more interior doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.
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Photo 103-1
 

104) The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
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Photo 104-1
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Photo 104-2

105) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
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Photo 105-1
 

Basement
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Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
Beam material: Steel
Floor structure above: Engineered wood joists

106) One or more electric receptacles have reverse-polarity wiring, where the hot and neutral wires are reversed. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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Photo 106-1
 

107) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
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Photo 107-1
 

108) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
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Photo 108-1
 

109)   One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the basement floor. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply).
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair).
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Photo 109-1
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Photo 109-2

Thermal Imaging
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110) The following potential moisture issues were noted: First floor sink drain has a leak.
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Photo 110-1
 

111) No anomalies were noted.
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Photo 111-1
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Photo 111-9
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Photo 111-10
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Photo 111-12

Sewer Scope
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112) Please copy and paste this link into your browser to view your sewer scope report:

https://files.acrobat.com/a/preview/d0a0174e-ff0a-4290-8c14-4c3466bb7938

113)   Please copy and paste this link into your browser to view your sewer scope video:

https://youtu.be/n18QREGBiPg

HERO Inspection Summary
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Top Concerns:
#1: Safety Concerns
#2: Plumbing installations, leaks, and sewer line
#3: Roof needs attention
#4: All appliances, including water heater and HVAC, are aging and may need replacing at any time
#5: Exterior Maintenance required soon
Client Present for Summary: No
Realtor Present for Summary: No
Foundation Condition: 7
Exterior Condition: 5
Roof Covering Condition: 6
Plumbing & Water Heater Condition: 6
Electrical System Condition: 7
HVAC Condition: 7
Interior Condition: 7
Issues w/ Sewer Line: Yes

114) This report should be read in it's entirety. The goal of this HERO summary is to help bring important issues to the forefront and to help the client understand, that while items may be written down about a system, the condition of the system as a whole.

Again *** please read the entire report ***

115) This brief summary is designed to take the overall inspection information and boil it down to a short graded opinion of each of the major systems.

Each section is graded 1-10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1-3 - Major repairs needed and/or replacement may be required soon.

4-7 - Minor repairs needed; but a significant amount of useful life left.

8-10 - No repairs needed and like new condition.

Radon
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116) Radon gas is a colorless and odorless gas released into the ground as a result of uranium decay. This invisible gas can be hazardous to your health in an enclosed structure. The radon inspection report is attached. The radon testing requires air sampling by an electronic radon monitor over a period of 48 hours.

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Surgeon General strongly recommend taking further action when the home’s radon results are 4.0 pCi/Lor greater. The higher a home’s radon level, the greater the health risk to you and your family. Smokers and former smokers are at higher risk. There are very straightforward methods for lowering the radon levels that can be performed for reasonable cost. Even homes with very high levels can be equipped to reduce those levels to below the EPA actionable level of 4.0 pCi/L.

Detailed information about radon and the health effects of radon and the proper steps to take to make your home safe can be found at the website of the EPA ‐ The address is: http://www.epa.gov/radon/pubs/hmbyguid.html#6.c.

The EPA recommends testing your home every two years.

117)   Results: 000.5 pCi/L average
Date & Time Start: 8/07/17 09:00
Date & Time Finish: 8/09/17 13:30
Hourly Readings:

RadStar RS300
Radon Detector/Monitor
Version 1.7
Serial#: 04713
Calib.#: 30559 Bkgnd03
TestID#: 30047
______________________________

Interval Report

Hour T B AC pCi/L Temp Hum Alpha
001 000.1 - - 0002
002 000.0 - - 0000
003 000.4 - - 0008
004 000.2 - - 0003
005 000.3 - - 0006
006 000.5 - - 0009
007 000.5 - - 0010
008 000.3 - - 0005
009 000.5 - - 0009
010 000.7 - - 0014
011 000.8 - - 0015
012 000.3 - - 0005
013 000.3 - - 0007
014 000.5 - - 0010
015 000.6 - - 0012
016 000.7 - - 0013
017 000.6 - - 0012
018 000.6 - - 0012
019 000.6 - - 0011
020 000.7 - - 0013
021 000.6 - - 0011
022 000.7 - - 0013
023 000.7 - - 0014
024 000.5 - - 0010
025 001.2 - - 0024
026 000.7 - - 0013
027 000.8 - - 0016
028 000.6 - - 0011
029 000.7 - - 0013
030 000.5 - - 0009
031 000.7 - - 0014
032 000.5 - - 0009
033 000.5 - - 0009
034 000.5 - - 0009
035 000.3 - - 0005
036 000.2 - - 0003
037 000.5 - - 0010
038 000.4 - - 0008
039 000.1 - - 0002
040 000.0 - - 0001
041 000.5 - - 0009
042 000.5 - - 0009
043 000.3 - - 0006
044 000.3 - - 0005
045 000.8 - - 0015
046 000.5 - - 0009
047 000.6 - - 0011
048 000.5 - - 0010
049 000.3 - - 0007
050 000.5 - - 0010
051 000.7 - - 0014
052 000.4 - - 0008

Avg: 000.5
Max: 001.2
Min: 000.0

NACHI Standards of Practice
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118) 1. Definitions and Scope
2. Limitations, Exceptions & Exclusions
3. Standards of Practice
3.1. Roof
3.2. Exterior
3.3. Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure
3.4. Heating
3.5. Cooling
3.6. Plumbing
3.7. Electrical
3.8. Fireplace
3.9. Attic, Insulation & Ventilation
3.10. Doors, Windows & Interior

1. Definitions and Scope
1.1. A general home inspection is a non-invasive, visual examination of the accessible areas of a residential property (as delineated below), performed for a fee, which is designed to identify defects within specific systems and components defined by these Standards that are both observed and deemed material by the inspector. The scope of work may be modified by the Client and Inspector prior to the inspection process.

The general home inspection is based on the observations made on the date of the inspection, and not a prediction of future conditions.

The general home inspection will not reveal every issue that exists or ever could exist, but only those material defects observed on the date of the inspection.

1.2. A material defect is a specific issue with a system or component of a residential property that may have a significant, adverse impact on the value of the property, or that poses an unreasonable risk to people. The fact that a system or component is near, at, or beyond the end of its normal, useful life is not, in itself, a material defect.

1.3. A general home inspection report shall identify, in written format, defects within specific systems and components defined by these Standards that are both observed and deemed material by the inspector. Inspection reports may include additional comments and recommendations.

2. Limitations, Exceptions & Exclusions
2.1. Limitations:
An inspection is not technically exhaustive.
An inspection will not identify concealed or latent defects.
An inspection will not deal with aesthetic concerns or what could be deemed matters of taste, cosmetic defects, etc.
An inspection will not determine the suitability of the property for any use.
An inspection does not determine the market value of the property or its marketability.
An inspection does not determine the insurability of the property.
An inspection does not determine the advisability or inadvisability of the purchase of the inspected property.
An inspection does not determine the life expectancy of the property or any components or systems therein.
An inspection does not include items not permanently installed.
This Standards of Practice applies to properties with four or fewer residential units and their attached garages and carports.

2.2. Exclusions:
I. The inspector is not required to determine:
property boundary lines or encroachments.
the condition of any component or system that is not readily accessible.
the service life expectancy of any component or system.
the size, capacity, BTU, performance or efficiency of any component or system.
the cause or reason of any condition.
the cause for the need of correction, repair or replacement of any system or component.
future conditions.
compliance with codes or regulations.
the presence of evidence of rodents, birds, animals, insects, or other pests.
the presence of mold, mildew or fungus.
the presence of airborne hazards, including radon.
the air quality.
the existence of environmental hazards, including lead paint, asbestos or toxic drywall.
the existence of electromagnetic fields.
any hazardous waste conditions.
any manufacturers' recalls or conformance with manufacturer installation, or any information included for consumer protection purposes.
acoustical properties.
correction, replacement or repair cost estimates.
estimates of the cost to operate any given system.
II. The inspector is not required to operate:
any system that is shut down.
any system that does not function properly.
or evaluate low-voltage electrical systems, such as, but not limited to:
1. phone lines;
2. cable lines;
3. satellite dishes;
4. antennae;
5. lights; or
6. remote controls.
any system that does not turn on with the use of normal operating controls.
any shut-off valves or manual stop valves.
any electrical disconnect or over-current protection devices.
any alarm systems.
moisture meters, gas detectors or similar equipment.
III. The inspector is not required to:
move any personal items or other obstructions, such as, but not limited to: throw rugs, carpeting, wall coverings, furniture, ceiling tiles, window coverings, equipment, plants, ice, debris, snow, water, dirt, pets, or anything else that might restrict the visual inspection.
dismantle, open or uncover any system or component.
enter or access any area that may, in the inspector's opinion, be unsafe.
enter crawlspaces or other areas that may be unsafe or not readily accessible.
inspect underground items, such as, but not limited to: lawn-irrigation systems, or underground storage tanks (or indications of their presence), whether abandoned or actively used.
do anything that may, in the inspector's opinion, be unsafe or dangerous to him/herself or others, or damage property, such as, but not limited to: walking on roof surfaces, climbing ladders, entering attic spaces, or negotiating with pets.
inspect decorative items.
inspect common elements or areas in multi-unit housing.
inspect intercoms, speaker systems or security systems.
offer guarantees or warranties.
offer or perform any engineering services.
offer or perform any trade or professional service other than general home inspection.
research the history of the property, or report on its potential for alteration, modification, extendibility or suitability for a specific or proposed use for occupancy.
determine the age of construction or installation of any system, structure or component of a building, or differentiate between original construction and subsequent additions, improvements, renovations or replacements.
determine the insurability of a property.
perform or offer Phase 1 or environmental audits.
inspect any system or component that is not included in these Standards.
3. Standards of Practice
3.1. Roof
I. The inspector shall inspect from ground level or the eaves:
the roof-covering materials;
the gutters;
the downspouts;
the vents, flashing, skylights, chimney, and other roof penetrations; and
the general structure of the roof from the readily accessible panels, doors or stairs.
II. The inspector shall describe:
the type of roof-covering materials.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
observed indications of active roof leaks.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
walk on any roof surface.
predict the service life expectancy.
inspect underground downspout diverter drainage pipes.
remove snow, ice, debris or other conditions that prohibit the observation of the roof surfaces.
move insulation.
inspect antennae, satellite dishes, lightning arresters, de-icing equipment, or similar attachments.
walk on any roof areas that appear, in the inspector's opinion, to be unsafe.
walk on any roof areas if doing so might, in the inspector's opinion, cause damage.
perform a water test.
warrant or certify the roof.
confirm proper fastening or installation of any roof-covering material.
3.2. Exterior
I. The inspector shall inspect:
the exterior wall-covering materials, flashing and trim;
all exterior doors;
adjacent walkways and driveways;
stairs, steps, stoops, stairways and ramps;
porches, patios, decks, balconies and carports;
railings, guards and handrails;
the eaves, soffits and fascia;
a representative number of windows; and
vegetation, surface drainage, retaining walls and grading of the property, where they may adversely affect the structure due to moisture intrusion.
II. The inspector shall describe:
the type of exterior wall-covering materials.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
any improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
inspect or operate screens, storm windows, shutters, awnings, fences, outbuildings, or exterior accent lighting.
inspect items that are not visible or readily accessible from the ground, including window and door flashing.
inspect or identify geological, geotechnical, hydrological or soil conditions.
inspect recreational facilities or playground equipment.
inspect seawalls, breakwalls or docks.
inspect erosion-control or earth-stabilization measures.
inspect for safety-type glass.
inspect underground utilities.
inspect underground items.
inspect wells or springs.
inspect solar, wind or geothermal systems.
inspect swimming pools or spas.
inspect wastewater treatment systems, septic systems or cesspools.
inspect irrigation or sprinkler systems.
inspect drainfields or dry wells.
determine the integrity of multiple-pane window glazing or thermal window seals.
3.3. Basement, Foundation, Crawlspace & Structure
I. The inspector shall inspect:
the foundation;
the basement;
the crawlspace; and
structural components.
II. The inspector shall describe:
the type of foundation; and
the location of the access to the under-floor space.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
observed indications of wood in contact with or near soil;
observed indications of active water penetration;
observed indications of possible foundation movement, such as sheetrock cracks, brick cracks, out-of-square door frames, and unlevel floors; and
any observed cutting, notching and boring of framing members that may, in the inspector's opinion, present a structural or safety concern.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
enter any crawlspace that is not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or pose a hazard to him/herself.
move stored items or debris.
operate sump pumps with inaccessible floats.
identify the size, spacing, span or location or determine the adequacy of foundation bolting, bracing, joists, joist spans or support systems.
provide any engineering or architectural service.
report on the adequacy of any structural system or component.
3.4. Heating
I. The inspector shall inspect:
the heating system, using normal operating controls.
II. The inspector shall describe:
the location of the thermostat for the heating system;
the energy source; and
the heating method.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
any heating system that did not operate; and
if the heating system was deemed inaccessible.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
inspect or evaluate the interior of flues or chimneys, fire chambers, heat exchangers, combustion air systems, fresh-air intakes, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters, geothermal systems, or solar heating systems.
inspect fuel tanks or underground or concealed fuel supply systems.
determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the heating system.
light or ignite pilot flames.
activate heating, heat pump systems, or other heating systems when ambient temperatures or other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment.
override electronic thermostats.
evaluate fuel quality.
verify thermostat calibration, heat anticipation, or automatic setbacks, timers, programs or clocks.
3.5. Cooling
I. The inspector shall inspect:
the cooling system, using normal operating controls.
II. The inspector shall describe:
the location of the thermostat for the cooling system; and
the cooling method.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
any cooling system that did not operate; and
if the cooling system was deemed inaccessible.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
determine the uniformity, temperature, flow, balance, distribution, size, capacity, BTU, or supply adequacy of the cooling system.
inspect portable window units, through-wall units, or electronic air filters.
operate equipment or systems if the exterior temperature is below 65° Fahrenheit, or when other circumstances are not conducive to safe operation or may damage the equipment.
inspect or determine thermostat calibration, cooling anticipation, or automatic setbacks or clocks.
examine electrical current, coolant fluids or gases, or coolant leakage.
3.6. Plumbing
I. The inspector shall inspect:
the main water supply shut-off valve;
the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
the water heating equipment, including the energy source, venting connections, temperature/pressure-relief (TPR) valves, Watts 210 valves, and seismic bracing;
interior water supply, including all fixtures and faucets, by running the water;
all toilets for proper operation by flushing;
all sinks, tubs and showers for functional drainage;
the drain, waste and vent system; and
drainage sump pumps with accessible floats.

II. The inspector shall describe:
whether the water supply is public or private based upon observed evidence;
the location of the main water supply shut-off valve;
the location of the main fuel supply shut-off valve;
the location of any observed fuel-storage system; and
the capacity of the water heating equipment, if labeled.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
deficiencies in the water supply by viewing the functional flow in two fixtures operated simultaneously;
deficiencies in the installation of hot and cold water faucets;
mechanical drain stops that were missing or did not operate if installed in sinks, lavatories and tubs; and
toilets that were damaged, had loose connections to the floor, were leaking, or had tank components that did not operate.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
light or ignite pilot flames.
measure the capacity, temperature, age, life expectancy or adequacy of the water heater.
inspect the interior of flues or chimneys, combustion air systems, water softener or filtering systems, well pumps or tanks, safety or shut-off valves, floor drains, lawn sprinkler systems, or fire sprinkler systems.
determine the exact flow rate, volume, pressure, temperature or adequacy of the water supply.
determine the water quality, potability or reliability of the water supply or source.
open sealed plumbing access panels.
inspect clothes washing machines or their connections.
operate any valve.
test shower pans, tub and shower surrounds or enclosures for leakage or functional overflow protection.
evaluate the compliance with conservation, energy or building standards, or the proper design or sizing of any water, waste or venting components, fixtures or piping.
determine the effectiveness of anti-siphon, back-flow prevention or drain-stop devices.
determine whether there are sufficient cleanouts for effective cleaning of drains.
evaluate fuel storage tanks or supply systems.
inspect wastewater treatment systems.
inspect water treatment systems or water filters.
inspect water storage tanks, pressure pumps, or bladder tanks.
evaluate wait time to obtain hot water at fixtures, or perform testing of any kind to water heater elements.
evaluate or determine the adequacy of combustion air.
test, operate, open or close: safety controls, manual stop valves, temperature/pressure-relief valves, control valves, or check valves.
examine ancillary or auxiliary systems or components, such as, but not limited to, those related to solar water heating and hot water circulation.
determine the existence or condition of polybutylene plumbing.
inspect or test for gas or fuel leaks, or indications thereof.
3.7. Electrical
I. The inspector shall inspect:
the service drop;
the overhead service conductors and attachment point;
the service head, gooseneck and drip loops;
the service mast, service conduit and raceway;
the electric meter and base;
service-entrance conductors;
the main service disconnect;
panelboards and over-current protection devices (circuit breakers and fuses);
service grounding and bonding;
a representative number of switches, lighting fixtures and receptacles, including receptacles observed and deemed to be arc-fault circuit interrupter (AFCI)-protected using the AFCI test button, where possible;
all ground-fault circuit interrupter receptacles and circuit breakers observed and deemed to be GFCIs using a GFCI tester, where possible; and
smoke and carbon-monoxide detectors.
II. The inspector shall describe:
the main service disconnect's amperage rating, if labeled; and
the type of wiring observed.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
deficiencies in the integrity of the service-entrance conductors’ insulation, drip loop, and vertical clearances from grade and roofs;
any unused circuit-breaker panel opening that was not filled;
the presence of single strand aluminum branch-circuit wiring, if readily visible;
any tested receptacle in which power was not present, polarity was incorrect, the cover was not in place, the GFCI devices were not properly installed or did not operate properly, evidence of arcing or excessive heat, and where the receptacle was not grounded or was not secured to the wall; and
the absence of smoke detectors.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
insert any tool, probe or device into the main panelboard, sub-panels, distribution panelboards, or electrical fixtures.
operate electrical systems that are shut down.
remove panelboard cabinet covers or dead fronts.
operate or re-set over-current protection devices or overload devices.
operate or test smoke or carbon-monoxide detectors or alarms.
inspect, operate or test any security, fire or alarm systems or components, or other warning or signaling systems.
measure or determine the amperage or voltage of the main service equipment, if not visibly labeled.
inspect ancillary wiring or remote-control devices.
activate any electrical systems or branch circuits that are not energized.
inspect low-voltage systems, electrical de-icing tapes, swimming pool wiring, or any time-controlled devices.
verify the service ground.
inspect private or emergency electrical supply sources, including, but not limited to: generators, windmills, photovoltaic solar collectors, or battery or electrical storage facility.
inspect spark or lightning arrestors.
inspect or test de-icing equipment.
conduct voltage-drop calculations.
determine the accuracy of labeling.
inspect exterior lighting.
3.8. Fireplace
I. The inspector shall inspect:
readily accessible and visible portions of the fireplaces and chimneys;
lintels above the fireplace openings;
damper doors by opening and closing them, if readily accessible and manually operable; and
cleanout doors and frames.
II. The inspector shall describe:
the type of fireplace.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
evidence of joint separation, damage or deterioration of the hearth, hearth extension or chambers;
manually operated dampers that did not open and close;
the lack of a smoke detector in the same room as the fireplace;
the lack of a carbon-monoxide detector in the same room as the fireplace; and
cleanouts not made of metal, pre-cast cement, or other non-combustible material.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
inspect the flue or vent system.
inspect the interior of chimneys or flues, fire doors or screens, seals or gaskets, or mantels.
determine the need for a chimney sweep.
operate gas fireplace inserts.
light pilot flames.
determine the appropriateness of any installation.
inspect automatic fuel-fed devices.
inspect combustion and/or make-up air devices.
inspect heat-distribution assists, whether gravity-controlled or fan-assisted.
ignite or extinguish fires.
determine the adequacy of drafts or draft characteristics.
move fireplace inserts, stoves or firebox contents.
perform a smoke test.
dismantle or remove any component.
perform a National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)-style inspection.
perform a Phase I fireplace and chimney inspection.
3.9. Attic, Insulation & Ventilation
I. The inspector shall inspect:
insulation in unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas;
ventilation of unfinished spaces, including attics, crawlspaces and foundation areas; and
mechanical exhaust systems in the kitchen, bathrooms and laundry area.
II. The inspector shall describe:
the type of insulation observed; and
the approximate average depth of insulation observed at the unfinished attic floor area or roof structure.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
the general absence of insulation or ventilation in unfinished spaces.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
enter the attic or any unfinished spaces that are not readily accessible, or where entry could cause damage or, in the inspector's opinion, pose a safety hazard.
move, touch or disturb insulation.
move, touch or disturb vapor retarders.
break or otherwise damage the surface finish or weather seal on or around access panels or covers.
identify the composition or R-value of insulation material.
activate thermostatically operated fans.
determine the types of materials used in insulation or wrapping of pipes, ducts, jackets, boilers or wiring.
determine the adequacy of ventilation.
3.10. Doors, Windows & Interior
I. The inspector shall inspect:
a representative number of doors and windows by opening and closing them;
floors, walls and ceilings;
stairs, steps, landings, stairways and ramps;
railings, guards and handrails; and
garage vehicle doors and the operation of garage vehicle door openers, using normal operating controls.
II. The inspector shall describe:
a garage vehicle door as manually-operated or installed with a garage door opener.
III. The inspector shall report as in need of correction:
improper spacing between intermediate balusters, spindles and rails for steps, stairways, guards and railings;
photo-electric safety sensors that did not operate properly; and
any window that was obviously fogged or displayed other evidence of broken seals.
IV. The inspector is not required to:
inspect paint, wallpaper, window treatments or finish treatments.
inspect floor coverings or carpeting.
inspect central vacuum systems.
inspect for safety glazing.
inspect security systems or components.
evaluate the fastening of islands, countertops, cabinets, sink tops or fixtures.
move furniture, stored items, or any coverings, such as carpets or rugs, in order to inspect the concealed floor structure.
move suspended-ceiling tiles.
inspect or move any household appliances.
inspect or operate equipment housed in the garage, except as otherwise noted.
verify or certify the proper operation of any pressure-activated auto-reverse or related safety feature of a garage door.
operate or evaluate any security bar release and opening mechanisms, whether interior or exterior, including their compliance with local, state or federal standards.
operate any system, appliance or component that requires the use of special keys, codes, combinations or devices.
operate or evaluate self-cleaning oven cycles, tilt guards/latches, or signal lights.
inspect microwave ovens or test leakage from microwave ovens.
operate or examine any sauna, steam-generating equipment, kiln, toaster, ice maker, coffee maker, can opener, bread warmer, blender, instant hot-water dispenser, or other small, ancillary appliances or devices.
inspect elevators.
inspect remote controls.
inspect appliances.
inspect items not permanently installed.
discover firewall compromises.
inspect pools, spas or fountains.
determine the adequacy of whirlpool or spa jets, water force, or bubble effects.
determine the structural integrity or leakage of pools or spas.


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For questions regarding your inspection, please contact HERO Inspections & Engineering Services, 303-500-3378.