Heck Home Inspections, LLC


Carl "Cory" Heck III 
cell 985-232-3217 
home 985-662-5093 
1425-G W. Tunnel Blvd., Houma, LA 70360 & 
46375-B Springer Drive, Hammond, LA 70401 

Inspector: Carl "Cory" Heck III
LHI # 10652

 

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Steve and Karla Spinella
Property address: 228 Ouiski Bayou Drive
Houma, LA 70360
Inspection date: 11/26/2012
This report published on Monday, November 26, 2012 8:43:31 PM CST

View report summary

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
ServiceableItem or component is in serviceable condition 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms. Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
 
General information Return to table of contents
Initial Consultation: Service contract reviewed, explained and signed.


Ambient Temperature: 68 degrees
Inspector: Carl "Cory" Heck III
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: Approx 20
Present during inspection: Client(s)
Occupied: No, but furnishings and stored items are present
Weather conditions: Rain
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Wet
Foundation type: Slab on grade
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Security system, Irrigation system, Swimming pool, Hot tub, Private well, Shed, Playground equipment, Sauna, Low voltage outdoor lighting, Central vacuum system, Water filtration system, Water softener system, Built-in sound system, Intercom system, Generator system, Sport court, Sea wall, Outbuildings
1) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
 
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Appears Serviceable, Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Brick veneer, Expanded insulation foam system (EIFS), Vinyl
Driveway material: Appears Serviceable, Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Appears Serviceable, Brick
Exterior door material: Solid core wood, Hollow core Metal
Column Type: Wood, Metal, Brick
2) Trip hazard(s) exist at stairs due to non-uniform riser heights. Standard building practices call for riser heights not to vary more than 3/8 inch on a flight of stairs. A qualified contractor should repair or replace stairs so all riser heights are within 3/8 inch of each other. noted front exterior stairs
3) Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed in one or more areas so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities. Noted right of back building
4) Minor cracks or mortar deterioration was found in one or more sidewalk sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern. The client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons. Noted at entry stoops. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.
    5) The finish on the second floor deck(s) is worn and/or deteriorated and several sections were rotted. Recommend cleaning, repairing and refinishing as necessary.
    6) Rot was found at the base of the stair stringers. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced or removed.
    7) The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet. Noted back building
    8) One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation or crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.
    9) The gutters are damaged. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should replace or repair gutters where necessary.
    10) Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion. Noted vinyl siding over back patio
    11) Cracks, deterioration and/or damage were found in one or more areas of the stucco siding. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace stucco siding as necessary. Noted several locations first and second floor
    12) Fences and/or gates are damaged and/or deteriorated in some areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs or replace sections as necessary. Noted back yard
    13) One or more light fixtures are damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair or replace light fixtures where necessary.
    14) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.
    15) Various gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, where 2 different surfaces meet and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin. For more information on caulking, visit The Ins and Outs of Caulking.
    16) Minor cracks were found in one or more sections of brick veneer. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as repointing mortar to prevent water intrusion and further deterioration in the future. Noted over the window back building. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.
    17) Soil is in contact with or less than six inches from siding and/or trim. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Soil should be graded and/or removed as necessary so there are at least six inches of space between the siding and trim and the soil below. Noted back building
    18) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
    19) Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. Noted around windows. For more information on caulking, visit The Ins and Outs of Caulking.
    20) One or more hornet, bee and/or wasp nests were found. These can pose a safety hazard. Nest(s) should be removed as necessary.
    21) Soffits Appear Serviceable
    22) Fascia Appears Serviceable
    23) Receptacles Appear Serviceable
    24) Gaps larger than four inches were found in one or more guardrails. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should make modifications as necessary so gaps in guardrails do not exceed four inches. For example, installing additional balusters or railing components.
    25)   see section pictures, start with "e"
     
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed, Viewed from windows
    Roof type: Hipped
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles, Rolled
    Estimated age of roof: 5yrs
    Gutter & downspout material: Metal
    Roof ventilation: Appears Adequate
    26) Gaps were found in one or more roof surface seams. These may result in leaks. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. Noted over back patio
    27) Standing water was found on the flat roof. It should evaporate within 48 hours after it rains. If standing water remains after 48 hours, then the roof installation is likely substandard. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair if necessary to prevent prolonged standing water.
    28) Roof Age Appears Serviceable
    29) Flashing Appears Serviceable
    30) Composition Shingles Appear Serviceable
    31)   see section pictures begin with "r"
     
     
    Garage Return to table of contents
    Type: Detatched
    Ceiling / Walls: Appears ServiceableRight garage
    32) The interior perimeter of the garage was not completely evaluated due to lack of access from stored items.
     
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Partially traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt, Cellulose loose fill
    Insulation depth: 6-9"
    33) Combustibles such as wood or insulation are in contact with or less than one inch from chimney or gas flue pipes in one or more areas. This is a fire hazard. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs or modifications as necessary so minimum clearances to combustibles are maintained around all chimney and flue pipes as per the manufacturer's specifications. noted back attic by 75gal waterheater
    34) One or more bathroom or exhaust fans have no duct and terminate in the attic. This is a conducive condition for mold on insulaion and wood destroying insects and organisms due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. Better building practices call for installing ducts and vent caps as necessary so exhaust air is vented outside or at minimum to the soffit vents. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary
    35) Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains were most likely caused by past leaks prior to the new roof. The client(s) should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. Noted in several areas
    36) Some attic areas were inaccessible due to depth of insulation, lack of permanently installed walkways, the possibility of damage to insulation, low height and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
    37) Ceiling insulation is missing in some areas. Recommend installing insulation where missing for better energy efficiency. Noted back
    38) The attic exhaust fan was not tested during the inspection. Recommend consulting with the property owner(s) as to how it operates and/or having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair if necessary.
    39) Evidence of "light to moderate" rodent infestation was found in one or more areas. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines this as less than 20 feces per square foot. Rodent infestation may be a safety hazard due to the risk of contracting Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). HPS is a rare (only 20-50 cases per year in the United states) but deadly (40% mortality rate) disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. For example, from sweeping up rodent droppings.

    Recommend following guidelines in the CDC's Clean Up, Trap Up, Seal Up article for eradicating rodents, cleaning up their waste and nesting materials, and preventing future infestations. While Hantavirus is believed to survive less than one week in droppings and urine, specific precautions should be taken during clean up. The client(s) may wish to consult with a qualified, licensed pest control operator for eliminating the infestation. A qualified licensed abatement contractor or industrial hygienist could be contacted for clean up. If the infestation was minimal, clean up of rodent waste and nesting materials in non-living spaces (crawl spaces and attics) may not be necessary, or may be performed for aesthetic reasons only (odor and appearance).

    40)   see section pictures start with "a"
     
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Underground
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: First floor room by kitchen
    Location of sub panels: First floor room by kitchen, two in the garage and back right exterior
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Copper
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    41) One or more overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses) are "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire. This is a safety hazard since the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks and fires may result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. Noted in smaller panel in room by the kitchen
    42) One or more knockouts have been removed inside the main service panel where no wires and bushings are installed, and no cover(s) have been installed to seal the hole(s). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. A qualified electrician should install knockout covers where missing. Noted big panel by kitchen in in the garage back left
    43) One or more screws are missing from the smaller panel by the kitchen panel cover and should be replaced. Stock screws from the panel manufacturer should be used, or their equivalent.
    44) Electric Meter Appears Serviceable
    45) Sub panel(s) Appears Servicable
    46) Low voltage interior wiring was found during the inspection such as tv cable, alarm wires, phone cable, etc. This is considered to be a specialty system. For a full evaluation, the client(s) should hire a qualified electrician.
    47)   See section pictures begin with "el"
     
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): 50And 75 gallon
    Manufacturer: Vanguard 50 gal (left attic) and Ruud 75 gal (right attic)
    Model: See pics for data
    Type: Tank
    48) No temperature-pressure relief valve is installed on the water heater tank. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of explosion. A qualified plumber should install a temperature-pressure relief valve and drain line as per standard building practices. Noted garage unit
    49) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future. Noted Vanguard unit
    50) Corrosion was found on fittings and/or water supply lines for the water heater. Leaks may exist. A qualified plumbing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    51) Excessive scale was found around the draft hood. This may be caused by condensation in the exhaust flue due to improper drafting and/or continuous use due to the water heater being undersized. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the water heater as necessary. Noted vanguard unit
    52)   see section pictures begin with "wh"
     
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
    Manufacturer: American Standard, Trane
    Model: Home has 3 units, see pics for data
    Filter location: In return air duct below furnace, At the base of the furnace
    Last service date: Unknown
    53) What appears to be mold is visible in one or more sections of supply and/or return air ducts. If it is mold, it can be a health hazard, especially for those with allergies or respiratory problems. The Environmental Protection Association (EPA) recommends considering having ducts professionally cleaned when "there is substantial visible mold growth inside hard surface (e.g., sheet metal) ducts or on other components of your heating and cooling system". The client may wish to have a qualified industrial hygienist or indoor air quality specialist evaluate the ducts and/or have a qualified contractor clean the ducts. For more information on duct cleaning in relation to indoor air quality, visit: http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/airduct.html
    54) One or more flexible gas supply connectors are routed through a metal cabinet. Standard building practices require that solid iron pipe be used where gas supply lines are routed through holes in metal cabinets. Continued vibration from this equipment may cause the edge of the metal cabinet to wear through the flexible connector, resulting in gas leaks. This is a safety hazard. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or modifications as necessary.
    55) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. All three units appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time if not maintained.
    56) The air conditioning system did not respond when its controls were operated. This system was not fully evaluated. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) as to how it operates and have a qualified heating and cooling contractor evaluate and make repairs if necessary. Noted third floor unit
    57) One or more air supply ducts boots appear to have inadequate insulation. Increased moisture levels in unconditioned spaces and higher energy costs may result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary. Noted on several supply registrars on the second floor
    58) The outside condensing unit is not level. Damage may occur if it is more than ten degrees off from level. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as replacing the pad that the condensing unit is installed on.
    59) Insulation for the outside condensing unit's refrigerant lines is damaged, deteriorated and/or missing in one or more areas. This may result in reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should replace insulation as necessary.
    60) A qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean fins and drain lines, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.
    61) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are too close to the outdoor condensing unit. Standard building practices require that there be at least 12 inches of clearance on all sides and at least four to six feet above. Inadequate clearances around the condensing unit can result in reduced efficiency, increased energy costs and/or damage to equipment. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain these clearances.
    62)   see section pictures begin with "ac"
     
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Location of main water shut-off valve: In meter
    Location of main water meter: Front yard to the right
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Not visible
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Plastic
    Drain pipe material: Plastic
    Waste pipe material: Plastic
    63) The washing machine is installed over a finished living space and has a rusted drain pan. Recommend having a qualified contractor replace the catch pan and clean the drain line.
    64) An improperly configuration dryer exhaust duct is installed. Clothes dryers produce large amounts of moisture which should not enter structure interiors. Damage to building components may result. A rigid or semi-rigid metal exhaust duct should be installed as per standard building practices and vented to daylight, and by a qualified contractor. For information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html
    65) Public Water Supply Pressure Appears Serviceable
    66)   see section pictures begin with "p"
     
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Masonry
    Chimney type: Masonry
    67) All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
    68) Fireplace Appears Serviceable
    69)   see section pictures begin with "fp"
     
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    70) Although operational, one or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    71) The range hood fan is noisy or vibrates excessively. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the fan or range hood as necessary.
    72) One or more control knobs for the range, oven and/or stove are damaged. Knobs should be replaced where necessary. Noted far right knob
    73) Dishwasher Appears Serviceable
    74) Refrigerator Appears Serviceable
    75) Range/oven/stove top Appears Serviceable
    76) Lighting Fixtures Appear Serviceable
    77) Faucets Appear Serviceable
    78) Sink Drains Appears Serviceable
    79) Cabinets Appear Serviceable
    80) Countertops Appear Serviceable
    81) Floors Appear Serviceable
    82)   See section pictures begin with "k"
     
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents
    Bathroom Locations: B: 1st floor hallway, C: Master Bedroom, D: Upstairs
    83) No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection device is visible for the electric supply to the jetted tub. If no GFCI protection exists, then this is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and install GFCI protection if none is installed.
    84) Tile, stone and/or grout flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more "wet" areas with a wood subfloor below. The deterioration may allow water intrusion, and may result in damage to the subfloor. in addition the shower stall appears to be setting. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing broken tiles and deteriorated grout, and resealing grout. Noted left second floor bath
    85) One or more toilets "run" after being flushed, where water leaks from the tank into the bowl. Significant amounts of water can be lost through such leaks (noted master). The first floor toilet overflows the tank and appears to have caused extensive wall and possible mold damage. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair or replace components as necessary.
    86) The master jet tub is not functioning and has a low water flow. There is a access panel at the end of the tub, by the motor. However there is no access to the shutoff valves.
    87) One or more leaks were found at water supply lines. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary. Noted under master jet tub
    88) One or more toilets are loose. A qualified contractor should remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repairs if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking. noted middle hall bath second floor
    89) One or more faucet handles are loose, broken or leaks and should be repaired or replaced as necessary. Noted middle second floor bath and master shower
    90) Most plumbing fixtures do not have access hatches. Recommend a qualified contractor install hatches for monitoring of plumbing, for repairs and to monitor for wood destroying organisms.
    91) Lighting Fixtures Appear Serviceable
    92) Exhaust Fans Appear Serviceable
    93) Sinks Appear Serviceable
    94) Cabinets Appear Serviceable
    95) Countertops Appear Serviceable
    96)   see section pictures begin with "b"
     
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    97) An insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
    98) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing. noted kitchen and 3rd floor
    99) One or more sections of wiring that was not terminated in a junction box were found. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box. Noted in several locations
    100) Seals between double-pane glass in one or more sliding glass doors appear to have failed based on condensation or stains between the panes of glass. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace glass where necessary. Several were noted on all four sides.

    The client(s) should be aware that evidence of broken seals may be more or less visible from one day to the next depending on the temperature, humidity, sunlight, etc. Glass doors or windows other than those that the inspector identified may also have failed seals and need glass replaced too.

    101) Floors in one or more areas are not level. Significant repairs may be needed to make floors level, such as repairs to the subfloor. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. Noted master bedroom
    102) The doorbell appears to be inoperable. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary. Upstairs
    103) The sash spring mechanism(s) in one or more windows are broken or loose ( noted back right living room). In addition the dormer windows have wood rot. A qualified contractor or service technician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so the window(s) operate as intended.
    104) Glass in one or more windows is broken. A qualified contractor should replace glass where necessary. Noted second floor left and master bath over tub
    105) One or more exterior door locksets are damaged and/or deteriorated. Locksets should be replaced as necessary. Noted back door
    106) Wood flooring in one or more areas is worn, damaged and/or cupping. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and refinish wood flooring as necessary. Noted first floor left and right front rooms
    107) Trim is missing in one or more areas. Recommend having a qualified contractor install trim where missing. Noted in the kitchen, upstairs entry and top stair threshold
    108) The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
    109) The handle(s) on the patio screen door is broken. Repairs should be made and/or handles replaced as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
    110) Trim is missing and damaged or deteriorated in one or more areas. Recommend having a qualified contractor install trim where missing, and replace or repair trim where necessary. noted kitchen, master bath, second floor hall
    111) Recommend cleaning and sealing the brick flooring now and in the future as necessary to prevent staining and to improve waterproofing.
    112) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary. Several we're noted throughout
    113) Handrails Appear Serviceable
    114) Minor flaws were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
    115) Minor cracks or damage was found in the walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
    116) Screen(s) in one or more windows are torn or have holes in them. Screens should be replaced where necessary.
    117) Carpeting in one or more rooms is loose and poses a trip hazard. A qualified carpeting installation contractor should restretch or replace carpet as necessary.
    118)   See section pictures begin with "i "
    119)   Inspector recommends that the client obtain a termite certificate. This type of inspection is beyond the scope of this inspection.

    AGREEMENT: This Agreement is incorporated with the Inspection Report to be prepared by Inspector. Said report is to be
    prepared for the sole and exclusive use of Client. Anyone executing this agreement on behalf of a buyer or seller of the subject
    property certifies that he/she is duly authorized by the Client to do so and is bound to deliver to Client the report incorporated
    herewith along with a copy of this agreement, which shall be binding on the Client.
    SUBJECT: Inspector agrees to conduct a limited, visual inspection of the property.
    SCOPE OF INSPECTION: The inspection of the subject property shall be performed by Inspector for the Client in accordance with
    the Standards of Practice as set forth by the Louisiana State Board of Home Inspectors. The purpose of the inspection is to identify
    and disclose to the client major deficiencies and defects of the systems and components of the subject premises, which are visually
    observable at the time of the inspection. The Inspection Report shall provide the Client with a better understanding of the property
    conditions as observed at the time of the home inspection. Although minor problems may be mentioned, the report will not attempt
    to list them all. The inspection will consist of only a visual analysis of major systems and components of the property and comment
    on those that are in need of immediate repair, replacement, or further evaluation by a specialist. The inspection is not technically
    exhaustive. The Inspection Report contains information that may or may not be mentioned or discussed during any verbal discussion
    of the findings of the Inspector. It is agreed that no claim shall be made against Inspector for any verbal representations, which are
    inconsistent with or not contained in the Inspection Report. PLEASE READ THE REPORT CAREFULLY!
    LIMITATIONS OF THE INSPECTION: The inspection is limited to readily accessible and visible major systems, components, and
    equipment located in and attached to the premises. Any are which is not exposed to view, is concealed, or is inaccessible because of
    soil, wall coverings, floor coverings, ceiling coverings, rugs, carpets, furnishings, or other materials is not to be considered part of this
    inspection. Weather limitations may affect the extent to which the Inspector may inspect the property, especially in connection with
    the heating and air conditions systems. This inspection is not considered to be an expressed or implied guarantee or warranty of any
    kind regarding the condition of the property, its system or components. Further limitations described in the report also apply.
    INSPECTION EXCLUSIONS: The following items are excluded from any inspection performed by the Inspector on the subject
    property:
    1. Hidden or latent defects;
    2. The presence of pests, termites, wood damaging organisms, rodents, or insects;
    3. Detached buildings, walkways, driveways, fencing, swimming pools, spas, underground plumbing or sprinklers, water softeners/purifiers, and
    other components or structures not attached to the premises, unless specifically agreed upon in writing by both parties;
    4. Testing for the presence of Chinese drywall or other similar products, asbestos, radon gas, lead paint, urea formaldehyde, soil contamination,
    potentially dangerous chemical substances, mold, mildew, algae, bacteria, air quality or other potential environmental hazards;
    5. Building code or zoning ordinance compliance or violation;
    6. The adequacy of any design or installation process of any system, component or other feature of the subject property;
    7. Structural stability, engineering analysis, geological stability or soil conditions unless otherwise agreed upon in writing by both parties;
    8. A prediction of future conditions or life expectancy of systems or components;
    9. The causes of the need for a repair, or the methods, materials and costs of a repair;
    10. The marketability or market value of the property, or the advisability or inadvisability of purchase of the property
    11. Any item excluded or not inspected or reported upon in the report;
    12. The internal conditions of air conditioning and heating systems or the adequacy of air flow, duct work and insulation;
    13. Furnace heat exchangers, fireplaces, chimneys or flues;
    14. Radio or remote controlled devices, alarms, garage door openers, automatic gates, elevators, thermostatic timer controls or dumbwaiters;
    15. The insurability of the property; and
    16. The grading of soil or the potential for flooding or holding standing water.
    NOTICE REQUIREMENTS: Client agrees that any claim alleging Inspector