House Detective of Westchester, Inc.

Website: http://www.reporthost.com/hdwestchester
Email: Jdellamura@aol.com
Phone: (914) 934-9030

 

The House Detective of Westchester, Inc.
Home Inspection Report
License # 16000011212
Client(s): Ed Kaziev
Property address: 34 Valley Lane West
Woodmere, NY 11581
Inspection date: 5/25/2010
This report published on Thursday, May 27, 2010 12:26:04 AM EDT

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Structural Pest Inspection Concerns
Concerns relating to the structural pest inspection are shown as follows:
DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
Conducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating
Cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Chimneys
Basement
Kitchen
Bathroom basement
Bathroom first floor
Bathroom second floor
Bathroom Master Bedroom
Interior rooms First Floor
Interior rooms Second Floor
 
General information Return to table of contents
Structures inspected: single family framed house
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: approximately 50 years old
Time started: 3:30 PM
Time finished: 6:00 PM
Present during inspection: Property owner(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: South, West
Main entrance faces: South, West
Foundation type: Finished basement
1) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygenists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)
     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Wall covering: Wood shakes
    Driveway material: Asphalt
    Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
    2) One or more flights of stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.

    The patio area is at a height were it should have a railing to protect anyone including children from falling from the patio accidentally.

    Photo 9  
    patio brick steps

    Photo 24  
    Due to height of patio, a railing to protect someone from falling would be advised.

    3) One or more electric receptacles are broken or damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. A qualified electrician should replace them as necessary.

    Photo 20  
    Electric outdoor outlet not working
     

    4) The arbor like structure covering the patio area is UNSAFE! Dangerous, do not walk under this structure, it is wobbly, leaning and not sturdy. I recommend that this structure be shored up immediately until it can safely be removed.

    Photo 23  
    structure is unsafe, do not go under it before it is shored up or repaired.
     

    5) Some wood rot was found in some of the house trim. Some window sills need to be repaired or replaced due to the rot.

    Photo 10  
    sill damage rear window
     

    6) The wood shakes have cupped, loosened and pulled away from the house sheathing in many areas. In addition the corners where shingles meet are large gaps the could allow for water to cause damage to the structure behind the shingles. It is recommended that all shingles be examined by a qualified contractor and any loose, cupped or damaged shingle be replaced and all gaps sealed. Any damage behind the shingles needs to be repaired also.

    Photo 8  
    Rear of the house

    Photo 16  
    Damaged and missing shingles

    Photo 17  
    Loose and gapping shingles

    Photo 19  
    Gaps in corners where shingles meet and some wood rot behind shingles.

    7) Cracks, deterioration and/or damage were found in one or more areas of the stucco siding. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace stucco siding as necessary.

    Photo 15  
    finish stucco damage
     

    8) Soffit boards are damaged or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    All the soffits are in need of scraping, sanding, primer and paint and any damaged areas need to be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

    9) Fascia boards are damaged or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    Fascia boards all need to be scraped, sanded, primed and painted and any damaged areas should be properly repaired by a qualified contractor.

    Photo 18  
    Loose shingle and trim

    Photo 70  
    roof area above master bedroom, note fascia damaged and wood shingle deteriorated.

    10) Patio is undermined in one or more areas, where soil has eroded out from beneath. Repairs should be made to prevent further erosion and undermining.
    The mold growth on the bricks is due to shading from vegetation. It may make sense to cut back vegetation to allow more sunshine into this area.

    Photo 25  
    Brick patio in need of cleaning and repair to low spots.
     

    11) Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.

    Photo 22  
    gap around conduit
     

    12) Some of the landscape timbers used in the yard have rotted and should be repaired or replaced as necessary.

    Photo 29  
    wood rot, landscape timbers in ground
     

    13) There is a large gap under the side door where the threshold should sit on top of the concrete ledge. A qualified contractor should make appropriate repairs to seal this gap.

    Photo 5  
    gap under doorway
     

    14) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

    Photo 2  
    ivy on house

    Photo 4  
    remnants of ivy

    Photo 6  
    vegetation too close to house

    Photo 7  
    vegetation too close to house

    15) Window glazing putty at one or more windows is missing and/or deteriorated. Putty should be replaced and/or installed where necessary. For more information on replacing window putty, visit: http://www.oldhouseweb.com/stories/Detailed/12216.shtml

    Photo 11  
    single pane double hung windows in need of maintenance.
     

    16) Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit The Ins and Outs of Caulking.
    17) The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.
    All wood trim and shingles need to be properly prepped and painted.

    18) Back of the house, near the rear patio are two small storage closets with doors. Scrape wood is sitting on dirt in this area, but no evidence was found during this inspection of any damage to this wood that was sitting on the ground.

    Photo 28  
    rear of house, outdoor closet storage area.
     

    19) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
    20) This house has a sprinkler system. It is recommended that the current homeowner explain how system works and company that maintains the system. I found some deficiencies during my inspection such as raised sprinkler heads. The system was not tested as part of this home inspection

    Photo 21  
    sprinkller head not flush with ground
     
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars, Viewed from windows
    Roof type: Hipped, Shed
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    21) This asphalt or fiberglass composition roof surface has two or more layers of roofing materials. When this roof is replaced, recommend a complete "tear off", where all existing layers of roofing are removed before installing new roofing materials. For 20-year rated composition shingles, additional layers of material reduce the new roof material's lifespan as follows:

  • 16-20 years - First roof
  • 12-16 years - Second layer on existing roof

    Removing existing roofing materials will significantly increase the cost of the next roof.
    22) Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.

    Photo 3  
    debris in gutter leader
     
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    23) The auto-reverse mechanism on the vehicle door opener is inoperable or requires too much force to activate. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html or http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html

    Photo 65  
    garage door does not have child safety feature
     

    24) The garage-house door poses a fire risk because it's not fire-rated (metal or solid-core construction). A qualified contractor should replace this door with a fire-rated door.
    25) The garage-house door isn't equipped with an automatic closing device such as sprung hinges. This door should close and latch automatically to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces and/or to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should install automatic closing device(s) as necessary, and as per standard building practices, so this door closes and latches automatically.
    26)   Weatherstrip at the sides and/or bottom of the vehicle door is damaged and/or deteriorated. It should be replaced where necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.
    27)   I found some evidence of moisture in the drywall located on either side of the garage door towards the floor. Even without recent rain these areas tested positive for moisture which may be due to soil placed up against the wood shingles on the outside of the house in these areas.

    Photo 63  
    some moisture in garage wall by garage overhead door.
     
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    28) Fiberglas batt insulation is installed upside down so its vapor barrier is installed away from the interior, heated space. This creates a cavity between the interior surface and the vapor barrier where moisture can accumulate and result in conducive conditions for wood destroying insects and organisms. The inspector was unable to determine if damage to the structure has resulted because the insulation obscures these cavities.

    Also, the facing on this insulation may be flammable, although the inspector was unable to determine this. Flammable facing should be located towards an interior surface to prevent the spread of fire.

    The client(s) should attempt to determine if the facing on this insulation is flammable. If it is, or if it can't be determined that it's not, then a qualified contractor should reinstall this insulation or install new insulation as per the manufacturer's recommendations to eliminate the fire hazard and conducive conditions for wood destroying insects. When the old insulation is removed, the exposed structure should be evaluated for damage by wood destroying insects and/or organisms, and repairs should be made if necessary. If the facing is determined not to be flammable, then repairs should be made by a qualified contractor to eliminate the conducive conditions for wood destroying insects and organisms. Cutting slits in the facing may be an adequate solution. Recommend that the structure obscured by the insulation be evaluated further to determine if damage by wood destroying insects and organisms has occurred, and that repairs be made if necessary.

    29) The ceiling insulation's R rating is significantly less than what's recommended for this area. Recommend having a qualified contractor install additional insulation as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency.

    Photo 91  
    attic insulation

    Photo 92  
    attic insulation

    30) No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.
    31) The attic was inspected from the hatch. Although attic fan is present, inspector could not determine if it was operational. It is recommended that homeowner be asked how fan is operated and if it is functional.

    Photo 87  
    attic area

    Photo 88  
    attic fan

    Photo 89  
    attic area

    Photo 90  
    attic area
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 150
    Location of main service switch: basement utility area
    Location of sub panels:
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 150
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed, (BX) Armor clad
    32) The service drop wires are in contact with trees or vegetation. Recommend having a qualified tree service company or arborist prune or remove trees as necessary to prevent straining or abrading the service drop wires.

    Photo 27  
    overhead cables appear to hang low in rear yard.
     

    33) One or more screws are missing from the main service panel cover and should be replaced. Because energized wiring may exist behind the holes with the missing screws, recommend that a qualified, licensed electrician replace these screws, or that care be taken to ensure that the new screws do not come in contact with wiring inside the panel when they are installed. Stock screws from the panel manufacturer should be used, or their equivalent.
    34) The electric service to this property appears to be rated at substantially less than 200 amps, and may be inadequate for the client(s) needs. Recommend consulting with a qualified electrician about upgrading to a 200 amp service.
    35) The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in the main service panel is missing, unreadable or incomplete. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

    Photo 34  
    Electric panel main

    Photo 35  
    subpanel

    36) The metal conduit is rusted and deteriorated and should be replaced.

    Photo 64  
    rusted conduit
     

    37) The A/C circuit breaker box located by the compressors outside, is loose and has pulled away from the sheathing. It is recommended that a qualified electrician evaluate this box and repair or replace as necessary.

    Photo 14  
    A/C breaker box, pulled from the house wall and rusted.
     
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: Less than 3 years old.
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): 50
    Manufacturer: A.O. Smith
    38) The hot water heater appears to be fairly new and in good operating condition.

    Photo 31  
    new hot water heater
     
     
    Heating Return to table of contents
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
    Filter location: At the base of the furnace
    39) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
    40) The metal ductwork, where exposed, appear to have air leaks that should be sealed for higher energy efficiency. They lose much air the the surroundings.
    41) Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.

    Photo 33  
    air filter needs changing. Recommend better quality filter
     

    42) Air handler filter(s) should be checked monthly in the future and replaced or washed as necessary.
    43) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. The inspector was unable to determine the exact age of the furnace. The clients should be aware that this furnace appears to be near, at, or beyond its useful life and may need replacing at any time. Recommend attempting to determine the furnace's age (ask property owner or service technician), and budgeting for a replacement if necessary.
    44) Due to the age of this furnace and repairs made through out the years, the standing pilot light flame appears to be over-sized and a slight smell of gas is observed when removing the furnace cover. I would recommend a qualified heating and cooling contractor evaluate and make necessary adjustments if required. It may also be wise to take advantage of any energy credits available by the utilities or government and have the unit replaced with a higher energy efficient model.

    Photo 32  
    wholehouse humidifier

    Photo 36  
    furnace pilot and burners

    Photo 37  
    furnace controls
     
     
    Cooling Return to table of contents
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
    Manufacturer: Rheem
    Filter location: At the base of the furnace
    45) The estimated useful life for air conditioning compressors is 8 to 15 years. This unit appears to have exceeded this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

    Photo 12  
    A/C unit

    Photo 13  
    A/C unit

    46) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.
    47) Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.
    48) Air handler filter(s) should be checked monthly in the future and replaced or washed as necessary.
    49) One upstairs bedroom appears to have a wall unit air conditioner installed and may not have cooling provided by the central air system. It is advisable to ask current owner about this unit.

    Photo 26  
    A/C unit for upstairs bedroom. Indicates central air not provided to this room.
     
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Location of main water shut-off valve: basement by the water meter.
    Location of main water meter: basement utility room
    Location of main fuel shut-off: basement utility room
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Cast iron
    Drain pipe material: Cast iron
    Waste pipe material: Cast iron
    50) No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection device is visible for the sump pump electric supply. A qualified electrician should determine if a GFCI protection device (receptacle or circuit breaker) exists for the sump pump and install one if missing to reduce the danger of electric shock.
    51) The clothes dryer is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information on dryer safety issues, see http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html

    Photo 62  
    dryer vent pipe. Wrong tpe pipe to use and not hung correctly
     

    52) The clothes dryer exhaust duct appears to need cleaning. Significant amounts of lint build up was found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire from decreased air flow. This duct should be cleaned now and annually, or more often if necessary in the future. Some chimney sweeps or heating/cooling duct cleaners perform this service. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html or http://chimneykeepers.com/dryerclean.html
    53) The sump pump's power supply appears to be on a circuit shared with other receptacles or fixtures. Sump pumps should be on a dedicated circuit so it doesn't stop working when other equipment malfunctions. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 43  
    sump pump pit with standing water
     

    54) Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
    55) The clean-out cap has been replaced indicating some type of plumbing problem in the past. Also, the plumbing waste pipe shows a possible crack in the pipe or it could just be due to paint failure. A qualified plumber should evaluate and determine if any problems exist in this area.

    Photo 48  
    new plumbing cap indicates past plumbing work

    Photo 50  
    possible crack in pipe, did not test positive for moisture.

    56) The utility room containing the plumbing waste clean-out, water meter and gas meter and cutoff valves. Sump pump also located in this area.

    Photo 41  
    utility room with sump pump and water main and plumbing
     

    57)   Some mold was found under one area of the waste plumbing pipe. This pipe appears to have been repaired and no active leaks found. However the floor tiles in this area are loose and did test positive for moisture in this area even though no recent rain.

    Photo 42  
    some mold below plumbing pipe, appears contained

    Photo 47  
    some moisture under floor tile in utility room

    Photo 49  
    new plumbing pipes attached to old pipes
     
     
    Chimneys Return to table of contents
    Chimney type: Masonry
    58) One or more chimney flues do not have a screened cover installed. Screened covers prevent the following:

  • Fire hazard from wood fire sparks and embers exiting flues
  • Wildlife (birds, rodents, raccoons, etc.) entering flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install screened cover(s) where missing. Screens should have holes 1/4 inch or larger.
    59) The chimney flue is dirty and requires a cleaning. The clean-out pit is filled with debris and twigs.

    Photo 30  
    Chimney needs cap and remove antenna

    Photo 38  
    chimney flue needs cleaning
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    60) One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in are loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 40  
    electric box not properly fastened
     

    61) Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. For example, water stains and/or efflorescence on the foundation or floor, water stains at bases of support posts, etc. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.

    Photo 44  
    some evidence of past mositure.
     

    62) Due to finished walls and ceilings in the basement, I could find no current signs of termites or termite damage. It should be noted that the neighbor on the left side of this house has installed the Sentricon Termite Baiting System around their home. This would indicate that subterranean termites are in the area. I spoke briefly with the current homeowner who indicated that the house had been treated for termites many years ago. It has not been treated since. It maybe advisable to have an exterminator evaluate this house since termite treatments usually last for about 5 years. I did find evidence of past termite activity in the basement ceiling area by the furnace, however the wood is intact. Damaged wood may have been removed.

    Photo 39  
    evidence of past termite activity.
     

    63) This house has a finished basement. It is difficult to spot deficiencies due to finished walls, ceilings and floors.

    Photo 51  
    finished basement area

    Photo 52  
    finished basement area with cedar lined closets
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    64) One or more cabinets and/or drawers are damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace cabinets and/or components as necessary.
    65) One or more kitchen appliances appear to be near, at, or beyond their intended service life of 10 to 15 years. Recommend budgeting for replacements as necessary.

    Photo 68  
    kitchen view
     

    66) The kitchen sink faucet has a low water flow which may be due to a clogged or dirty aerator. A qualified plumber should evaluate and make necessary repairs.

    Photo 66  
    undersink area kitchen

    Photo 67  
    kitchen water flow is low, maybe clogged strainer
     
    Bathroom basement Return to table of contents

    67) Basic 1/2 bath located in basement.

    Photo 45  
    basement bathroom

    Photo 46  
    under sink plumbing
     
    Bathroom first floor Return to table of contents

    68) One or more faucets leak by handle(s) or at their base when turned on. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 57  
    leaky faucet in first floor bathroom
     

    69) Water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below one or more sinks. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 58  
    undersink first floor bathroom. some sticky or frozen valves and slight corrosion on drain pipes

    Photo 59  
    cabinet floor base has some evidence of past water damage. tested dry no moisture found.

    70) This bathroom had a ceiling fan, but inspector could not find control switch for this fan, ask homeowner if fan is operational and how it works.

    Photo 60  
    vent fan in first floor bathroom does not work.
     
     
    Bathroom second floor Return to table of contents

    71) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 79  
    no GFI outlet in this common bathroom 2nd floor
     

    72) One or more bathrooms with a shower do not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.
    73) This bathroom has two sink areas. One is located outside the main bathroom area. One sink has some corrosion on pipes or valves, but no active leaks found.

    Photo 80  
    under sink valves and drain pipes

    Photo 81  
    undersink drain and valves note some corrosion and valves are frozen

    Photo 82  
    bathroom view 2nd floor common

    Photo 83  
    2nd floor bathroom
     
    Bathroom Master Bedroom Return to table of contents

    74) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    75) Tile and/or grout in one or more showers is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, deteriorated or missing grout, cracked, missing or loose tiles, etc. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair tile and/or grout as necessary.

    Photo 72  
    master bedroom shower pan needs to be replaced.
     

    76) One or more bathrooms with a shower do not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.
    77) Some corrosion around sink piping, but no leaks found. Some cut off valves found to be frozen, so they cannot be turned off in case of an emergency.

    Photo 73  
    under sink valves and drain
     

    78)   The shower head has a leak when water is turned on. It is recommended that a qualified plumber makes proper repairs.

    Photo 74  
    leaky shower head
     
     
    Interior rooms First Floor Return to table of contents

    79) Two-pronged electric receptacles rather than three-pronged, grounded receptacles are installed in one or more interior rooms. They are considered to be unsafe by today's standards and limit the ability to use appliances that require a ground in these rooms. Examples of appliances that require grounded receptacles include:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. A qualified electrician should evaluate and install grounded receptacles as per the client(s)' needs and standard building practices.

    Photo 78  
    some two prong outlets should be replaced
     

    80) An insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
    81) Lamp holders or light fixtures with fully or partially exposed bulbs are installed in one or more closets. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Flammable stored items may come into contact with hot bulbs, and hot fragments from broken bulbs may fall on combustible materials. Standard building practices require closet lighting to use fluorescent light fixtures, or to use fully enclosed incandescent fixtures. Installing a compact fluorescent lamp in a lamp holder is not an acceptable practice. A qualified electrician should replace closet lights as necessary and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 75  
    light bulb in closet, should be unexposed
     

    82) Tile, stone and/or grout flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing broken tiles and deteriorated grout, and resealing grout.

    Photo 56  
    entry hall
     

    83) One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.
    84) Stains were found in one or more ceiling areas. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found. The stain(s) may be due to past roof and/or plumbing leaks. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this, and monitoring the stained area(s) in the future, especially after heavy or prolonged rain. If elevated moisture is found in the future, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 55  
    some damage to living room ceiling
     

    85) Minor cracks were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
    86) Minor cracks were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 53  
    dining room

    Photo 54  
    living room

    Photo 61  
    second living room area
     
     
    Interior rooms Second Floor Return to table of contents

    87) Two-pronged electric receptacles rather than three-pronged, grounded receptacles are installed in one or more interior rooms. They are considered to be unsafe by today's standards and limit the ability to use appliances that require a ground in these rooms. Examples of appliances that require grounded receptacles include:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. A qualified electrician should evaluate and install grounded receptacles as per the client(s)' needs and standard building practices.
    88) Guardrails are loose and/or wobbly in one or more areas. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as installing new fasteners or hardware, installing additional fasteners and/or installing additional railing components as necessary so they are securely attached.

    Photo 69  
    deck area off master bedroom. railing is loose
     

    89) An insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
    90) Lamp holders or light fixtures with fully or partially exposed bulbs are installed in one or more closets. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Flammable stored items may come into contact with hot bulbs, and hot fragments from broken bulbs may fall on combustible materials. Standard building practices require closet lighting to use fluorescent light fixtures, or to use fully enclosed incandescent fixtures. Installing a compact fluorescent lamp in a lamp holder is not an acceptable practice. A qualified electrician should replace closet lights as necessary and as per standard building practices.
    91) One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.
    92) One or more sliding glass doors are difficult to open or close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace door(s) as necessary.

    Photo 71  
    patio doors need to be replaced.
     

    93) Minor cracks were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
    94) Minor cracks were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 76  
    first bedroom has wall unit a/c unit.

    Photo 77  
    second bedroom

    Photo 84  
    third bedroom

    Photo 85  
    fourth bedroom

    Photo 86  
    master bedroom
     

    95) The windows throughout this house are single pane double hung windows. They have been neglected and window glazing has deteriorated and they require painting. For higher energy efficiency, it is recommended to take advantage of rebate programs, and replace all windows with new double pane windows.
     
    This inspection report is not an appraisal of value or survey. This is not a compliance report for past or present code violations or regulations of any kind. It is merely an accounting of visible observations made at this location.
    This house is approximately 50 years old and has been maintained and is generally in good condition. Areas that require attention include all the wood shakes around the outside of the house and cooresponding wood trim that paint has failed. The interior is dated, but has been kept in good condition. Use this report as a guide when determining what areas require immediate attention and those that can wait.