Sherlock Homes Inspections

Website: http://www.reporthost.com/sherlockhmin
Email: rwebb005@columbus.rr.com
Phone: (937) 205-2074
P.O. Box 100 
The Plains, OH 45780
Inspector: Randy Webb

 

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Mock Report #1
Property address: 12150 Bean Hollow Rd
Athens, OH 45701
Inspection date: Tuesday, January 29, 2008
This report published on 1/31/2008 8:41:13 AM EST

View summary page

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major defectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor defectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Exterior Electrical
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 001Mock
Structures inspected: 12150 Bean Hollow Rd, Athens, OH 45701
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: Approx 20 years
Property owner's name: The Mock Family
Time started: 3:30
Time finished: 5:30
Exterior door material: Solid core steel
Inspection Fee: Mock
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: No one
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Cloudy, Rain
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Wet
Front of structure faces: South
Main entrance faces: South
Foundation type: Unfinished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Security system, Irrigation system, Swimming pool, Hot tub, Private well, Shed, Playground equipment, Sauna, Low voltage outdoor lighting, Central vacuum system, Water filtration system, Water softener system, Built-in sound system, Intercom system, Generator system, Sport court, Sea wall, Outbuildings


1) Some or all sections of this property's plumbing system were"winterized" at the time of the inspection. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the plumbing system and fixtures, such as toilets, faucets and sinks.
2) The water service wasn't turned on during the inspection. As a result, plumbing supply, drain and waste lines, fixtures, and some appliances such as water heaters weren't fully evaluated.
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Foundation material: Concrete block
Driveway material: Gravel
Sidewalk material: N/A
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
3) Cracks, deterioration, leaning and/or bowing were found in one or more retaining walls. Because of the height or proximity to foundations or property lines, a qualified structural engineer should evaluate to determine what repairs are necessary. Repairs should be made by a qualified contractor.

Photo 2  
Retaining wall showing rot and major leaning
 

4) One or more exterior electric receptacles aren't waterproof or rated for use in wet areas. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified electrician if necessary, so all exterior receptacles are waterproof as per standard building practices.
5) One or more retaining walls higher than three feet exist on this property and guardrails or barriers are missing or inadequate. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. At a minimum, the client(s) should be aware of this hazard, especially when children are present. Ideally a qualified contractor should install adequate guardrails or make modifications to existing barriers as necessary above retaining walls higher than 3 feet to eliminate fall hazards. Dense shrubbery or vegetation may be acceptable as a barrier, but only when mature enough to be effective.

Photo 2  
Retaining wall showing rot and major leaning
 

6) Gaps larger than four inches were found in one or more guardrails. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should make modifications as necessary so gaps in guardrails do not exceed four inches. For example, installing additional balusters or railing components.

Photo 9  
Incorrect spacing of balusters
 

7) Rot was found in one or more areas on soffit boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.

Photo 4  
Soffit deterioration and rot
 

8) Rot was found in one or more areas on fascia boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.

Photo 4  
Soffit deterioration and rot
 

9) The gravel driveway is in poor condition. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as filling holes or grading, and new gravel should be spread.
10) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.
    11) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
    12) Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.
     
    Exterior Electrical Return to table of contents

    13) One or more outdoor electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all outdoor receptacles within six feet six inches of ground level have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from eaves on ladder
    Roof type: Gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 15 years
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    14) Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    15) Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed in one or more areas so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.
    16) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

    Photo 5  
    Junction box in garage with cover missing
     

    17) Extension cords are being used as permanent wiring in one or more areas. They should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring poses a fire and shock hazard, and is an indication that wiring is inadequate and should be updated. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure, resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, and sparks that could start a fire. Extension cords should be removed as necessary, or a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install additional circuits and/or electric receptacles.

    Photo 6  
    Wire junction in garage, not inside of junction box. This is also lamp wire
     

    18) The garage-house door isn't equipped with an automatic closing device such as sprung hinges. This door should close and latch automatically to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces and/or to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should install automatic closing device(s) as necessary, and as per standard building practices, so this door closes and latches automatically.
    19) No infrared "photo eye" devices are installed for the vehicle door's electric door opener. They've been required on all vehicle door openers since 1993 and improve safety by triggering the vehicle door's auto-reverse feature without need for the door to come in contact with the object, person or animal that's preventing it from closing. Recommend considering having a qualified contractor install these devices for improved safety. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html or http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html
    20) The lock mechanism on the garage vehicle door is inoperable or difficult to operate. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary so vehicle doors can be easily secured.
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Not inspected
    Roof structure type: Trusses
    Ceiling structure: Trusses
    21) No accessible attic spaces were found or inspected at this property.
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Location of main service switch: Basement
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    22) The inspector didn't remove the main service panel cover due to water leaking into the panel. This is a shock hazard. This panel wasn't fully evaluated. Repairs should be made as necessary to prevent water from leaking into the panel. The panel had evidence of prior leakage from the shut off valve above and a drain trap.

    Photo 7  
    Plastic bag in place to direct water away from main panel box. Evidence of prior water dripping.
     

    23) One or more screws are missing from the main service panel cover and should be replaced. Because energized wiring may exist behind the holes with the missing screws, recommend that a qualified, licensed electrician replace these screws, or that care be taken to ensure that the new screws do not come in contact with wiring inside the panel when they are installed. Stock screws from the panel manufacturer should be used, or their equivalent.
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Energy source: Electricity
    Capacity (in gallons): 115
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Primary heating system energy source: Electric
    Primary heat system type: Forced air, Heat pump, Standard efficiency
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Heat pump
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ductsFoil wrapped duct board
    Filter location: At the base of the furnace
    24) The outdoor air temperature was below 60 degrees Fahrenheit during the inspection. Because of this, the inspector was unable to operate and fully evaluate the cooling system.

    Photo 3  
    Heat Pump is totally iced over. The self clean cycle did not operate during the 2 hour inspection
     
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Basement, south wall
    Location of main water meter: At road, in meter pit
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Polyethelene
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Plastic
    Drain pipe material: Plastic
    Waste pipe material: Plastic
    25) No expansion tank is installed on this structure's water supply system. Expansion tanks are recommended when a property is on a public water supply system and the property's water system is "closed" via a pressure reducing valve (PRV), check valve, or backflow preventer. No room for expansion of water exists in this type of system. Thermal expansion occurs when water is heated during non-use periods. In a closed system with no provision for expansion, its effects may include:

  • Backflow into the water main
  • Damage to water heater connections, gas water heater flue tubes and pumps serving washers and dishwashers
  • Leaking faucets
  • "Weeping" of water through the water heater temperature-pressure relief (TPR) valve
  • Noisy water hammer in the pipes.

    Expansion tanks can eliminate these problems by giving water a place to go when thermal expansion occurs. When a water heating cycle ends, or when any fixture is opened within the system, the impact of thermal expansion is reduced, and water drains out of the expansion tank back into the system. Recommend having a qualified plumber install an expansion tank as per standard building practices.
    26) Washer and dryer located in basement are not part of this inspection. No warranty or opinion of any kind is offered as part of this report. The client would be recommended to contact a qualified appliance repair facility to verify the working order ot these units.
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type:
    Woodstove type: Metal
    Chimney type: Masonry
    27) The inspector was unable to determine if the woodstove and flue are installed safely, and in accordance with the manufacturers' specifications. The manufacturer's information label(s) were illegible and/or missing. Recommend having a qualified stove and/or chimney service contractor evaluate to determine if the woodstove and flue are in installed in accordance with the manufacturers' specifications, and make repairs and/or modifications if necessary.
    28) One or more chimney flues do not have a screened cover installed. Screened covers prevent the following:

  • Fire hazard from wood fire sparks and embers exiting flues
  • Wildlife (birds, rodents, raccoons, etc.) entering flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install screened cover(s) where missing. Screens should have holes 1/4 inch or larger.
    29) A small woodstove is installed in the basement. The stove is sitting directly on the concrete floor, and is appox. 24" from an exterior masonry wall. The clearance from the top of the stove to the basement ceiling is over 5'. There are not combustible surfaces anywhere in contact with this unit. However, as noted above, it is impossible for this inspection to determine if this unit is installed per manufacturers instructions. A qualified Class A inspector or chimney sweep should be consulted.
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Pier or support post material: Concrete, Steel
    Beam material: Steel
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    30) The laundry sink in the basement has a non-GFCI located within 3' of it. A licensed electrician should be consulted.
    31) Gaps larger than four inches were found in one or more guardrails. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should make modifications as necessary so gaps in guardrails do not exceed four inches. For example, installing additional balusters or railing components.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    32) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    33) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 10  
    Coverplate missing in kitchen
     

    34) The water supply to the dishwasher appears to be inoperable. The shut-off valve may be turned off. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the dishwasher and its drain system. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this, and if necessary, a qualified plumber or appliance technician should evaluate and repair.
    35) One or more cabinets and/or drawers are damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace cabinets and/or components as necessary.
    36) No range hood is installed over the range or cook top. Ventilation and/or lighting may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a vented and lighted range hood, with the exhaust fan configured so as to vent outdoors.
    37) Hardware such as hinges, latches or pulls are loose and/or missing on one or more cabinets. Repairs should be made and/or hardware should be replaced as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    38) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 8  
    Non GFCI outlet next to bath sink
     

    39) One or more toilets have no water supply and could not be fully evaluated. The shut-off valve(s) may be turned off, or repairs may be necessary. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this, and have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair if necessary.
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    40) The doorbell appears to be inoperable. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.
    41) The doorbell appears to be inoperable. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.
     
    Your default report footer here...