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Website: http://www.gemstatehomeinspections.com
Email: gemstateinspect@gmail.com
Phone: (208) 640-1673
9030 N Hess St. Suite 221 
Hayden ID 83835-9827
Inspector: Timber Turner

  

Gem State Home Inspections

Client(s):  Fred and Wilma Gemstones
Property address:  7777 Bedrock Lane
Coeur d Alene Id
Inspection date:  Saturday, March 14, 2015

This report published on Saturday, March 14, 2015 4:49:31 PM PDT

Please understand that there are limitations to this inspection. Many components of the home are not visible during the inspection and very little historical information is provided in advance of the inspection. While we can reduce your risk of purchasing a home, we cannot eliminate it, nor can we assume it. Even the most comprehensive inspection cannot be expected to reveal every condition you may consider significant to ownership. In addition to those improvements recommended in our report, we recommend that you budget for unexpected repairs. On average, we have found that setting aside roughly one percent of the value of the home on an annual basis is sufficient to cover unexpected repairs.

How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeServiceableItem or component is in satifactory condition
Concern typeCommentFor your information

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Grounds
Exterior and Foundation
Roof
Attic and Roof Structure
Garage or Carport
Electric
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Water Heater
Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
Kitchen
Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
Interior, Doors and Windows


General Information
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Report number: 8765309
Time started: 10:00
Time finished: 12:00
Present during inspection: Client
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions during inspection: Rain
Temperature during inspection: Cool, 41 degrees
Square ft. of property: 2148
Payment: No charge
Type of building: Single family
Buildings inspected: One house
Age of main building: 1974
Source for main building age: Municipal records or property listing
Front of building faces: North
Main entrance faces: North
Occupied: No
1) Structures built prior to the mid 1980s may contain lead and/or asbestos. Lead is commonly found in paint and in some plumbing components. The EPA does not recognize newer coats of paint as encapsulating older coats of lead-based paint. Asbestos is commonly found in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Laws were passed in 1978 to prohibit usage of lead and asbestos, but stocks of materials containing these substances remained in use for a number of years thereafter. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is beyond the scope of this inspection. Any mention of these materials in this report is made as a courtesy only, and meant to refer the client to a specialist. Consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement specialists for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?EPA
http://www.reporthost.com/?CPSC
http://www.reporthost.com/?CDC
2) The water service was not turned on during the inspection. The inspector operates only "normal" controls such as faucets, and does not operate shut-off valves to the water meter or house. As a result, plumbing supply, drain waste and vent lines, traps, pumps, fixtures, and some appliances such as water heaters weren't fully evaluated. The water pressure was not determined. Recommend that a qualified person make a full evaluation of the plumbing system after the water supply is turned back on. Areas below the house should be evaluated after plumbing has been operated to check for leaks. Any problems that are found after this evaluation should be repaired by a qualified plumber.
3) Based on non-standard construction observed, additions and/or modifications to this property may have been made without the owner having attained permits or inspections from the municipality. Work may have been performed by someone other than a qualified contractor or person. Consult with the property owner about this, and if necessary research permits.

At worst case, if substantial work was performed without permits, this knowledge must be disclosed when the building is sold in the future. This can adversely affect future sales. Also, the local municipality could require costly alterations to bring the building into legal compliance or even require that the additions or modifications be removed.
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Photo 3-1
One car garage was converted to a living room.
 

4)  Pools, spas, hot tubs, saunas, steam baths, fountains and/or other types of related systems
and components, including any concealed or underground plumbing, piping or electrical, are not apart of this inspection
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Photo 4-1
 

Grounds
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Site profile: Minor slope
Condition of driveway: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Condition of sidewalks and/or patios: Satisfactory
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete, Paving stones
Condition of deck, patio and/or porch covers: Satisfactory
Deck, patio, porch cover material and type: Open
Condition of decks, porches and/or balconies: Satisfactory
Deck, porch and/or balcony material: Plastic fiber
Condition of stairs, handrails and guardrails: Satisfactory
Exterior stair material: Concrete
5) Cracks, holes, settlement, heaving and/or deterioration were found in the driveway. Recommend that qualified contractor repair as necessary.
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6) Minor deterioration (e.g. cracks, holes, settlement, heaving) was found in sidewalks or patios, but no trip hazards were found. The client may wish to have repairs made for cosmetic reasons.
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Exterior and Foundation
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Wall inspection method: Viewed from ground
Condition of wall exterior covering: Satisfactory
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Vinyl
Condition of foundation and footings: Satisfactory
Apparent foundation type: Finished basement
Foundation/stem wall material: Poured in place concrete
Footing material (under foundation stem wall): Poured in place concrete
Hose bibs-Anti siphon valves: Satisfactory
7) Fence(s) were attached to or in contact with the building exterior. Such attachments can serve as a pathway for wood-destroying insects and can retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary so there is at least a 2-inch gap between fences and building exteriors.
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Photo 7-1
 

8) The paint or stain finish in some areas was failing (e.g. peeling, faded, worn, thinning). Siding and trim with a failing finish can be damaged by moisture.Recommend that a qualified contractor prep (e.g. clean, scrape, sand, prime, caulk) and repaint or restain the building exterior where necessary and per standard building practices. Any repairs needed to the siding or trim should be made prior to this.
Roof
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Roof inspection method: Traversed
Condition of roof surface material: Satisfactory
Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Roof type: Hipped
Condition of exposed flashings: Satisfactory
Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
9) Significant amounts of debris such as leaves, needles, seeds, etc. have accumulated on the roof surface. Water may not flow easily off the roof, and can enter gaps in the roof surface. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend cleaning debris from the roof surface now and as necessary in the future.
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Photo 9-1
Carport roof.
 

10) One or more gutters and/or downspouts were loose and/or leaking. Rainwater can come in contact with the building exterior or accumulate around the building foundation as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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11)
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Ridge roof cap missing.
 

12) Some debris have accumulated in one or more gutters or downspouts. Recommend cleaning gutters and downspouts now and as necessary in the future.
Attic and Roof Structure
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Attic inspection method: Viewed from hatch(es)
Condition of roof structure: Satisfactory
Roof structure type: Trusses
Ceiling structure: Trusses
Condition of insulation in attic (ceiling, skylight chase, etc.): Satisfactory
Ceiling insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
Approximate attic insulation R value (may vary in areas): R-38
Condition of roof ventilation: Satisfactory
Roof ventilation type: Box vents (roof jacks), Gable end vents, Enclosed soffit vents
13) The roof decking was spongy, soft or springy in one or more areas when the inspector walked on those areas. This may be caused by deteriorated sheathing, damaged rafters or trusses, and/or otherwise substandard construction. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
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14) One or more exhaust fan ducts terminated at a Gable vent rather than at a dedicated hood or cap. Gable vents are designed to allow cool air to be drawn into the attic, and to prevent excess moisture from accumulating in the attic. When such ducts are routed to terminate at Gable vents, the moist exhaust air may flow back into the attic and the Gable venting will be reduced. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing approved hoods or caps at the roof surface or exterior wall(s), and permanently securing exhaust ducts to them.
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Photo 14-1
Bathroom vent was attached to gable vent.
 

15) The inspector attempts to locate attic access points and evaluate attic spaces where possible. Such access points may be obscured by stored items or furnishings, but various home inspection standards of practice do not require inspectors to move stored items, furnishings or personal belongings. If such access points are found in the future and/or made accessible, a qualified person should fully evaluate those attic spaces and roof structures.
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Photo 15-1
No access to attic above living room/previous garage.
 

Garage or Carport
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Type: Attached
Condition of door between garage and house: Satisfactory
Condition of garage floor: Satisfactory
Electric
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Electric service condition: Satisfactory
Primary service type: Underground
Number of service conductors: 3
Service voltage (volts): 120-240
Estimated service amperage: 200
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers, Fuses
Service entrance conductor material: Stranded copper
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
System ground: Cold water supply pipes
Condition of main service panel: Satisfactory
Condition of sub-panel(s): Satisfactory
Location of main service panel #A: Basement, Bedroom
Location of main service panel #B: Utility room, Basement
Location of sub-panel #C: Building exterior
Condition of branch circuit wiring: Satisfactory
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection present: Yes
Arc fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) protection present: No
Smoke alarms installed: Yes, but not tested
Carbon monoxide alarms installed: Yes, but not tested
16) Panel(s) #B and C used screw-in fuses for the over-current protection devices. Fuses are prone to tampering and over-fusing, which can damage wiring and cause fire hazards. Insurance companies may deny coverage for homes with fused panels. Modern panels use circuit breakers for over-current protection devices, which can be reset easily after tripping rather than needing to replace fuses. Modern panels also offer more flexibility for new, safer protective technologies like ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCls) and arc fault circuit interrupters (AFCls). Consult with a qualified electrician about replacement options for fused panels, and about other system upgrades as necessary.
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Photo 16-1
 

17) One or more electric receptacles (outlets) at the kitchen and/or pool had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection, or the inspector was unable to determine if GFCI protection was present. If not GFCI-protected, receptacles in wet areas pose a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and install GFCI protection if necessary and per standard building practices. General guidelines for GFCI-protected receptacles include the following locations:For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?GFCI
18) One or more receptacles (outlets) were worn. Worn receptacles can work intermittently or when the plug is wiggled. They can overheat or arc and spark due to loose connections. This is a potential fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician replace such receptacles as necessary.
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Photo 18-1
No electric power to outlet.
 

19) One or more receptacles (outlets) were installed directly above electric baseboard heaters. This was a common practice in the past, but insulation on appliance cords in contact with the heater(s) can be damaged by heaters. This is a shock and fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician make repairs or modifications as necessary. For example, by converting receptacles to junction boxes, moving receptacles and/or moving baseboard heaters.
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20) One or more electric receptacles (outlets) had reverse-polarity wiring, where the hot and neutral wires were reversed. This is a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?RPR
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Photo 20-1
 

21) One or more electric receptacles (outlets) were incorrectly wired with an open neutral. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair as necessary.
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Photo 21-1
 

22) Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may have been installed more than 10 years ago. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SMKALRMLS
23) Electrical panel.
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24) GFI;s Tripped and reset in both bathrooms
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Plumbing / Fuel Systems
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Condition of service and main line: Satisfactory
Water service: Public
Location of main water shut-off: Basement
Condition of supply lines: Satisfactory
Supply pipe material: Copper
Condition of drain pipes: Satisfactory
Drain pipe material: Galvanized steel
Condition of waste lines: Satisfactory
Waste pipe material: Galvanized steel
Vent pipe condition: Satisfactory
Vent pipe material: Galvanized steel
Location of main fuel shut-off valve: At gas meter, At building exterior
25) Main water shutoff valve located in basement utility room.
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Photo 25-1
 

26) This home was winterized. Typically this means the following:"De-winterizing" a home is not part of a home inspection. The inspector does not operate shut-off valves, meter valves, circuit breakers, or light pilot lights. This significantly limits the ability of the inspector to evaluate various systems and components such as plumbing fixtures, supply/drain/waste/vent lines and the water heater. They are excluded from this inspection. Recommend when the home has been completely de-winterized that a qualified person fully evaluate them.
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27) The water supply to some plumbing system fixtures, appliances and/or components appeared to be shut off during the inspection and these were not fully evaluated. They are excluded from the inspection.
Water Heater
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Type: Tank
Energy source: Electricity
Capacity (in gallons): 50
Location of water heater: Basement
Hot water temperature tested: No
28) No drain line was installed for the temperature-pressure relief valve. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. Recommend that a qualified plumber install a drain line per standard building practices.
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Photo 28-1
 

Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
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General heating system type(s): Electric heaters
Condition of electric heaters (not forced air): Satisfactory
Electric heater type (not forced air): Baseboard, Wall mounted, with fan
Condition of cooling system and/or heat pump: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Cooling system and/or heat pump fuel type: Electric
Location: Living  room
Type: Through wall
Condition of controls: Satisfactory
29) Dirt or lint had accumulated on the fins, fan blades and/or motor of one or more electric wall heaters equipped with fans. This is a potential fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified person clean heaters now and as necessary in the future. Note that the power to heaters must be turned off at the electric panel before cleaning them.
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30) The heat pump or air conditioner condensing unit was not fully evaluated because the the overcurrent protection device was turned off, tripped or missing. Recommend that a full evaluation be made by a qualified person when conditions have been corrected so the system is operable. Note that the inspector does not operate or replace overcurrent protection devices, or operate any controls other than normal controls (thermostat).
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Photo 30-1
 

Kitchen
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Condition of counters: Satisfactory
Condition of cabinets: Satisfactory
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of under-sink food disposal: N/A (none installed)
Condition of range, cooktop or oven: Evaluate.
Range, cooktop or oven type: Electric
Type of ventilation: Hood or built into microwave over range or cooktop
Condition of refrigerator: Satisfactory
Condition of built-in microwave oven: N/A (none installed)
Condition of range, cooktop or oven: Satisfactory
31) No high loop or air gap was visible for the dishwasher drain. A high loop is created by routing the drain line up to the bottom surface of the counter top above and securely fastening it to that surface. An air gap is a device that makes the drain line non-continuous. Both of these prevent waste-water backflow from entering the dishwasher, and possibly flooding out of the dishwasher if/when a siphon occurs. Some newer dishwashers have these devices built in. The client should try to determine if these devices are built in to this brand and model of dishwasher (e.g. review installation instructions). If not, or if this cannot be determined, then recommend that a qualified contractor install a high loop and air gap per standard building practices.
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32) One of the burners on the stove did not turn on.
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33) Water damage was found in shelving or cabinets below the sink. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary after any plumbing leaks have been repaired. If moisture is present then concealed areas should be dried thoroughly.
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34) Gaps, no caulk, or substandard caulking were found between countertops and backsplashes and/or around the sink. Water may penetrate these areas and cause damage. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, by installing caulk.
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Photo 34-1
 

Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
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Location #A: Full bath, second floor
Location #B: 3/4 bath, basement
Condition of counters: Satisfactory
Condition of cabinets: Satisfactory
Condition of flooring: Satisfactory
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Satisfactory
Condition of toilets: Satisfactory
Condition of bathtubs and related plumbing: Satisfactory
Condition of shower(s) and related plumbing: Satisfactory
Condition of ventilation systems: Satisfactory
Bathroom and laundry ventilation type: with individual ducts
Gas supply for laundry equipment present: No
240 volt receptacle for laundry equipment present: Yes
35) The clothes dryer exhaust duct was kinked, crushed or damaged. Air flow will be restricted as a result and the clothes dryer may overheat. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Recommend that a qualified person replace or repair the duct as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?DRYER
36) Gaps, no caulk, or substandard caulking were found between the bathtub and the walls at location(s) #A and B. Water may penetrate these areas and cause damage. Recommend that a qualified person re-caulk or install caulking as necessary.
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37) The wall and/or Ceiling   by the shower at location(s) #B was water-damaged. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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Interior, Doors and Windows
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Condition of exterior entry doors: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Exterior door material: Metal, Fiberglass or vinyl, Sliding glass
Condition of interior doors: Satisfactory
Condition of windows and skylights: Satisfactory
Type(s) of windows: Vinyl, Metal, Single-pane, Sliding
Wall type or covering: Drywall, Plaster
Ceiling type or covering: Acoustic spray
Condition of flooring: Satisfactory
Flooring type or covering: Carpet, Tile
Condition of stairs, handrails and guardrails: Satisfactory
38) One or more holes were found in the interior walls patch and repair as needed.
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39) Squeaking or creaking noises occur when walking on one or more sections of flooring. This is usually caused by substandard construction practices where the sub-floor decking is not adequately fastened to the framing below. For example, not enough glue was used and/or nails were used rather than screws. In most cases, this is only an annoyance rather than a structural problem. Various solutions such as Squeeeeek No More and Counter Snap fasteners exist to correct this. Repairs to eliminate the squeaks or creaks may be more or less difficult depending on the floor covering and the access to the underside of the sub-floor. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SQUEAK
40) One or more interior doors were damaged. Recommend that a qualified person replace or repair doors as necessary.
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41) Carpeting in one or more areas was damaged or deteriorated. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace as necessary.
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42) Minor cracks, nail pops and/or blemishes were found in walls and/or ceilings in one or more areas. Cracks and nail pops are common, are often caused by lumber shrinkage or minor settlement, and can be more or less noticeable depending on changes in humidity. They did not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons. For recurring cracks, consider using an elastic crack covering product:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ECC
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43) One or more exterior doors had minor damage and/or deterioration. Although serviceable, the client may wish to repair or replace such doors for appearances' sake.
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Rear French doors leading to back yard/pool needs repaired or replaced
 


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Gas meter on carport side of house.
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Roof vents satisfactory.
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Back yard pergola satisfactory.
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Back of house.

Thank you for selecting our company. We appreciate the opportunity to be of service. Should you have any questions about the general condition of the house in the future, we would be happy to answer these. There is no fee for this telephone consulting. Our fees are based
on a single visit to the property. If additional visits are required for any reason, additional fees may be assessed.


Thank You,
Timber Turner


Gem State Home Inspections
208-640-1673