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Website: http://www.reporthost.com/gainey
Email: inspector132@comcast.net
Phone: (765) 744-3005
8605 W Butternut Rd, Muncie, Indiana 47304
Inspector: Jeff Gainey
Indiana License #HI00500083

 

Home Inspection Report by Gainey Home Services Inc.
Client(s): Sample over 50yrs old
Property address: Indiana
Inspection date: 1/22/2011
This report published on Saturday, January 22, 2011 3:12:50 PM EST

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This report is the exclusive property of this Gainey Home Inspections and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Safety ConcernImmediate Safety Concern. Poses a risk of serious injury or worse if not corrected. 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense by a specialist. Estimate of repair estimated to be over $500. 
Livability ConcernRepair or replacement is needed. This may affect livability unless corrected soon and may require repair by a specialist. 
Maintain/RepairMaintenance will be needed. This is considered normal aging and can be added to the "Honey Do List". 
Moisture ControlWater is a destructive force that should be controlled. Improvement is needed to accomplish this. 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance. Preventative maintenance can reduce costly repairs in the future. 
EvaluateA closer look is needed to determine extent of hidden damage or status of condition. Recommend evaluation by a specialist qualified with specialized training. Always get 2-3 estimates. 
MonitorPeriodic checks and repairs are recommended to maintain this system. 
Grandfathered SafetyWhen the home was built, the condition was common. New Standards apply today to make this system safer and is recommended by the inspector to be improved for a safer living environment.. 
CommentInformation that I think may be useful -----or---- a question I would ask of the seller to better understand the operation or service needed for this system. 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
Property & Site
General information
Exterior
Roof
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Plumbing
Water heater/Well System
Private Well
Heating and Cooling
Crawl space
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms

 
Property & Site Return to table of contents

1) BUILDING CODES:
The first thing to remember about building codes is that safety hazards DO NOT read the building code book. Safety hazards don't care about the building code book. Safety hazards just sit and wait to cause you and your family personal injury. Also remember that the building code is developed by nationwide experts in particular topic areas. It is then sent to the state where some homebuilders, a few state experts, and politicians decide what is going to be enforced in the state. It is then sent to the local level where mostly home builders and politicians decide what's going to be enforced locally. It's then given to the code enforcement inspectors to interpret according to how they read the code. In addition, the local code often lags several years behind the national codes.

The building code is not a lofty standard. It is the bare minimum legal standard that a home builder, electrician, plumber, etc, must comply with. To do anything less would be illegal.

I serve a large area of Indiana with many different building code enforcement authorities, each with their own individual interpretations of the national and state building codes based on their local politics and beliefs. I cannot be completely conversant with each and every building code enforcement authority's interpretation of the national building codes; therefore I do not perform code compliance inspections nor guarantee that all items are in compliance with governing codes, regulations, ordinances, statutes, covenants and manufacturer specifications. My references and sources for calling out different items as a safety concern or defective or marginal or in need of repair may include the national building codes (International Residential Code / National Electric Code / Uniform Plumbing Code, etc), manufacturer's instructions, the building industry's standards, continuing education, and personal experience.

If the response to an area of concern or a recommendation in my report is, "Well, they didn't have that (or they didn't do that) when the house was built," or that it was "grandfathered", I usually know that. When it comes to home repairs, "Grandfathered" is a term often tossed out by people who care more about their wallet than about you and your family's safety: as in "That 8 inch gap in the balcony railing doesn't need to be fixed because it's grandfathered. It was okay to do it that way when this house was built.” Is it going to comfort you, when your child falls through that gap and is badly injured, that the size of the gap was "Grandfathered"? All "Grandfathered" really means is that no one can "force" you to change it, repair it, or replace it. Only you can choose what level of risk you want to live with. People with young children who could fall thru that 8 inch gap "should" choose to ensure it is changed to a safer gap but no one is going to force a change except you.

Since whatever issue was "grandfathered", our knowledge has increased considerably concerning safety in the home. I believe that you should be safe in your home and that taking care of your home should be as easy as possible. So I will recommend things that they didn't have or do years ago simply to keep you safe or help you take care of your home. What's most important to me is that you and your family are as safe as possible in your home. Only you can choose what level of risk you want to live with and expose your family to.

2) Today's inspection is being done using the Standards of Practice of the
Great Lake Chapter of the American Society of Home Inspectors as a
Guideline.
http://www.ashi.org/inspectors/standards/standards.asp
The inspection contracts and the limitations and standards
specified therein are an integral part of this report. I am also Licensed
by the State of Indiana and my license # is HI00500083.

3) Environmental issues are out of the scope of today's inspection and should
be addressed separately. This inspection will
not result in the information of presence of any environmental hazard that
may be present, although if noticed in the course
of my inspection may be reported as a possible concern. There may be
environmental concerns that although may be present were not seen by the
inspection today since I am not here for that type of inspection.

4) It is beyond the scope of this limited visual inspection to identify every
component in the home subject to warnings and recalls. I do, however, come
across warnings and recalls in my studies that I have shared in this
report. It is also beyond the scope to identify all safety hazards or concerns in the home.
I do my best to share the information that I know will help you and I do not want to mislead you into thinking that I have checked all of the components in this
home for recall information or identified all the safety hazards present in this home.
The fridge and range were checked for recalls but none were found.

Photo 54  

Photo 55  

5) Water is a very destructive force and should be controlled on the outside
to reduce problems that may go undetected for some time on the inside/under the house. Drainage patterns should be monitored and improved as needed to carry water away from foundation. Extend leaders to discharge at least 6' away from building to reduce moisture penetration and foundation damage.

6) Moisture problems may exist in the basement/crawl space as noted in the report and should be evaluated/corrected as possible serious issues. Moisture is a
very destructive force that over time may result in structural issues along
with health related issues. Environmental issues are out of the scope of
today's inspection however and should be evaluated separately if warranted.

7) Older homes were built before any of the benefits of the modern building codes were thought of and there may be concerns noted in the report that although are not allowed by current standards, were common practice when this home was built. Often, maintenance and repairs are an ongoing expense in owning a period style home and need to be budgeted for. Different time periods and repair/service people may introduce different materials used to repair the systems. This report will try to identify items needing immediate attention, but not to be an all inclusive list of repairs needed.
8) There is a website from Michigan State University that will give repair techniques and hints that may be useful to maintain your new home.
http://www.msue.msu.edu/objects/content_revision/download.cfm/revision_id.500139/workspace_id.-4/master02.html/

There is also a website you should visit that has good information to read
"Before you move in"
http://www.buildingscience.com/documents/primers/bsp-043-read-this-before-you-move-in

 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 1875
Type of building: Single family
Time started: 4PM
Inspection Fee: $350.00
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Client(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Ground condition: Damp
Front of structure faces: South
Foundation type: Unfinished basement, Crawlspace
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Private well
9) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygenists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)
     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Footing material: Block
    Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Wall covering: Vinyl
    Driveway material: Gravel
    Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
    Porch: Wood
    Soffit material: Wood
    Fascia: Wood
    10) Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces, or near foundation running underground to another location. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.
    This was seen on west side where it is held too close to the metal edge trim of roof. The abrasion potential may allow it to cut into the wires. This was seen at garage side also.

    Photo 21  

    Photo 57  

    11) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
    This was seen at house west side today and also on garage north side.

    Photo 16  

    Photo 17  

    Photo 19  
     

    12) Abandoned service conductors seen between house and porch should be eliminated for safety reasons. It was not live today when tested but should be respected until eliminated.

    Photo 10  
     

    13) Outside faucets are missing [url=http://www.abpa.org/Doc/PDF/Intro%20to%20CCC%20Brochure.pdf]backflow prevention devices[/url]. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

    Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit: http://www.abpa.org/Doc/PDF/Intro%20to%20CCC%20Brochure.pdf

    14) The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.

    I noticed several areas where the foundation wall has shifted with possible damage requiring a closer look by a structural contractor.

    Photo 2  

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    Photo 36  

    15) Downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks or adding extensions so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.
    16) Soffit boards are damaged or deteriorated in some areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 11  

    Photo 18  

    17) Recommend sealing around windows along wall and sill where different materials meet to reduce water entry with a clear 50 yr silicone caulk. Some of the existing caulk is older and beginning to fail.

    Rot conditions were seen in several areas today. Unable to determine extent of hidden damage. Recommend a closer look and possibly an intrusive inspection and repair as needed.

    Photo 4  

    Photo 5  

    Photo 7  

    Photo 9  

    Photo 37  
     

    18) Downspouts are loose or damaged and in need of repair. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary so downspouts are securely anchored and functional. These should also have extensions installed that carry water at least 6 ft away from the foundation. Recommend improvement.

    Photo 24  

    Photo 34  

    19) Gutters are damaged. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should replace or repair gutters where necessary.
    20) Gaps exist at openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.

    Photo 13  

    Photo 23  

    Photo 39  
     

    21) Fascia boards are damaged or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 20  

    Photo 30  

    Photo 31  
     

    22) The dryer vent is either damaged or clogged and should be cleaned out and vent repaired/replaced.

    Photo 22  
     

    23) Some damage seen along sill plate where water entry is likely. Recommend a closer look and repair as needed.

    Photo 12  
     

    24) Negative slope seen at the foundation area today. Recommend improving slope away from the foundation to reduce water entry into crawl. This can be done by adding dirt to area close to foundation wall to slope away from the foundation. Always keep 8 inches separation between top of ground and bottom of siding edge.

    Photo 3  

    Photo 8  

    Photo 15  

    Photo 25  

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    25) The chimney has moved away from the side of home in the past. A metal brace has been added to reduce further movement.

    Photo 33  
     

    26) Some portions of foundation and/or exterior walls are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from vegetation, debris and/or stored items.

    Photo 35  

    Photo 38  

    27) Is the abandoned propane tank belong to seller or gas company. Recommend removal if not used anymore.

    Photo 56  
     

     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Cross gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 13yrs
    Gutter & downspout material: Steel
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    28) Gutter sections seen today should be resecured to reduce further movement and damage associated with it. Loose nails will allow the gutter system to sag and the weight of the accumulated water will weigh it down until it separates from the fascia. Recommend correction by a qualified contractor.
    29) Sections of flashing at the base of the chimney are deteriorated and/or substandard. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 47  
     

    30) Counterflashing is missing at the base of chimney. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing or chimney service contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    31) The roof surface material appears to be in the last third of its service life and will likely need replacing in the next 3-6 years. As the shingles age further, they will continue to lose their granular protection, become brittle and become prone to wind damage. Some patching has already been done in several areas. The client(s) should budget for a replacement roof surface.
    There are two layers of shingles on the roof which both add to the cost of replacement and reduce the life of the upper shingles.

    Also the porch roof would be considered a flat roof area and shingles are not the appropriate material since water can and will wick up underneath and allow leaks to occur.
    Recommend budgeting to replace these shingles with a rubber roof material to reduce further damage.

    Photo 40  

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    Photo 42  

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    Photo 50  

    Photo 51  

    Photo 52  
     

    32) One or more roof surface sections slope down towards flat roof surface sections. Debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate in this area than rest of the roof. Leaks may occur as a result. Recommend monitoring such areas for accumulated debris in the future and cleaning as necessary.
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Chimney type: Masonry
    33) One or more chimney flues do not have a screened cover installed. Screened covers prevent the following:

  • Fire hazard from wood fire sparks and embers exiting flues
  • Wildlife (birds, rodents, raccoons, etc.) entering flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install screened cover(s) where missing. Screens should have holes 1/4 inch or larger.

    Photo 48  
     

    34) The masonry chimney crown is deteriorated (cracked or broken) and needs repairs or replacement. The crown is meant to keep water off of the chimney structure. The chimney can be damaged by wet masonry going through freeze-thaw cycles. A properly constructed chimney crown should:

  • Be constructed using either pre-cast concrete slabs, cast-in-place steel reinforced concrete, solid stone, or metal
  • Be sloped down from the flue a minimum of 3 inches of fall per foot of run
  • Extend a minimum of 2-1/2 inches beyond the face of the chimney on all sides
  • Not directly contact the flue liner (if installed), and this gap should be filled with flexible caulk
  • Have flashing installed between the bottom of the crown and the top of the brick chimney

    A qualified chimney service contractor or mason should evaluate and repair or replace the crown as necessary.

    Photo 49  
     

    35) The masonry chimney's mortar is deteriorated and should be repaired to prevent further, significant deterioration. Recommend having a qualified chimney service contractor or mason evaluate chimney and repair as necessary. This will likely require repointing the mortar.

    Photo 29  

    Photo 46  

     
    Garage Return to table of contents
    Walls: Drywall/Plaster
    36) Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces, or near foundation running underground to another location. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.

    Photo 66  
     

    37) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

    Photo 65  
     

    38) Some wiring is loose, unsupported, or inadequately supported. Standard building practices require non-metallic sheathed wiring to be trimmed to length, attached to runners or to solid backing with fasteners at intervals of 4-1/2 ft. or less. Fasteners should be installed within 12 inches of all enclosures. Also the wiring should be secured away from entrances to reduce damage to the sheathing form travel or storage items.A qualified, licensed electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, trim wire to length and/or install staples as needed.
    39) Extension cords are being used as permanent wiring. They should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring poses a fire and shock hazard, and is an indication that wiring is inadequate and should be updated. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure, resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, and sparks that could start a fire. Extension cords should be removed as necessary, or a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install additional circuits and/or electric receptacles.

    Photo 62  
     

    40) The infared "photo eye" devices that trigger the vehicle door opener's auto-reverse feature are located higher than 4 to 6 inches from the floor. They have been taped up in the ceiling at opener bracket.This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should relocate these devices so they're 4 to 6 inches from the floor. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html or http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html

    Photo 61  
     

    41) Garage vehicle door opener appears newer with the door. The door could not be tested today due to cat and kittens trying to escape. Recommend asking the seller to demonstrate its operation and test the reversing mechanism as required for door openers this age.
    42) Additional information can be found at the underwriter laboratories website on garage door safety and testing.
    http://www.ul.com/consumers/garagedoors.html

    43) The subpanel servicing this area is not wired correctly and has defects that should be corrected by a licensed electrician.

    Photo 63  

    Photo 64  

    44) The concrete block walls have stair step cracks seen on both east and west sides. Improve slope of ground and drainage away from foundation to reduce further movement/damage.
    Also recommend adding a gutter system to control water away from foundation.
    The shingles are newer and in good condition. A few nail pops seen that should be repaired soon.

    Photo 58  

    Photo 59  

    Photo 60  
     

    45) Garage door was not tested today for operation of the reversing mechanism by laying a 2x4 down flat in middle area of door and allowing door to close. The door should reverse as it hits this board. The door was not tested because there are reinforcing plates that are required for the top section of door where opener attaches. Without these plates, there could be damage to the door connection/panel if the door did not reverse as required. Recommend installing these plates and seasonal testing of this safety feature.
    46) Much of the garage, include areas around the interior perimeter and in the center are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
    Insulation depth: 6In
    Insulation estimated R value: R24_______________
    47) One or more hornet, bee and/or wasp nests were found. These can pose a safety hazard. Nest(s) should be removed as necessary.

    Photo 67  
     

    48) Ventilation appears to be normal today with gable end vents noticed that are typical for the age of the home.

    Insulation is typical for the age of the home at about an R19. Current standards call for an R49 rating. Recommend eventual upgrade.

    Photo 71  

    Photo 72  

    49) Screens are missing and/or deteriorated at one or more gable vents. Birds and vermin may enter the attic because of this. Screens should be replaced or repaired where necessary, or installed where missing.

    Photo 70  
     

    50) No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.
    51) No weatherstrip is installed around the attic access hatch. Weatherstrip should be installed around the hatch to prevent heated interior air from entering attic.
    52) Signs of rodent presence seen in the insulation which is typical for the location.

    Photo 68  

    Photo 69  

    53) Additional knee wall bracing has been added to support the roof system better than original design.

    Photo 73  
     

     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of sub panels: Basement
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed, Copper
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    Room for Expansion: Yes
    54) Current standards require a ground rod installed for the separate low voltage cable/telephone and antenna systems that may be present. These systems should have a ground rod with a bonding connection to the main electric grounding connection to reduce the difference of potential in case of a lightning strike. Recommend correction by a licensed electrician.

    I did notice a lightning rod system installed across the roof today. One cable is disconnected at the west end ridge location that should be reconnected to complete system.

    55) I could not verify bonding of the water pipes to the electric ground system
    today. Equipment bonding is required even though parts of the service lines have been replaced with plastic water line to protect against equipment grounding faults across metal objects. Recommend bonding of the remaining metal components be verified and corrected if necessary by a licensed electrician.

    56) Since the main disconnect is located under the meter outside, this distribution panel is considered a sub panel. Neutral and equipment ground conductors are properly separated. Neutral conductors should be attached to a "floating" neutral bar not bonded to the panel, while grounding conductors should be attached to a separate grounding bar bonded to the sub panel. This isolation was done properly and professionally.

    Photo 129  
     

    57) A "GFCI" is a ground fault circuit interrupter. A ground fault circuit interrupter is an inexpensive electrical device that, if installed in household branch circuits, could prevent over two-thirds of the approximately 300 electrocutions still occurring each year in and around the home. Installation of the device could also prevent thousands of burn and electric shock injuries each year.

    The GFCI is designed to protect people from severe or fatal electric shocks. Because a GFCI detects ground faults, it can also prevent some electrical fires and reduce the severity of others by interrupting the flow of electric current.

    Read more: [urlhttp://www.doityourself.com/stry/gfci#ixzz0geGO85gi/url]

    Here is a link telling you when they were required at each location;
    [urlhttp://www.castlecheck.com/Charlotte_Home_Inspectors_1_NPI/General-Information/GFCI%20OUTLETS%20NEC.pdf/url]

    58) Problems in home wiring, like arcing and sparking, are associated with more than 40,000 home fires each year. These fires claim over 350 lives and injure 1,400 victims annually.

    A new electrical safety device for homes, called an arc fault circuit interrupter or AFCI, is expected to provide enhanced protection from fires resulting from these unsafe home wiring conditions.

    Typical household fuses and circuit breakers do not respond to early arcing and sparking conditions in home wiring. By the time a fuse or circuit breaker opens a circuit to defuse these conditions, a fire may already have begun.

    Several years ago, a CPSC study identified arc fault detection as a promising new technology. Since then, CPSC electrical engineers have tested the new AFCIs on the market and found these products to be effective.

    Requiring AFCIs

    AFCIs are already recognized for their effectiveness in preventing fires. The most recent edition of the National Electrical Code, the widely-adopted model code for electrical wiring, will require AFCIs for bedroom circuits in new residential construction, effective January 2002.

    Future editions of the code, which is updated every three years, has expanded coverage to include all living area rooms.

    I recommend upgrading to these for additional safety against fires.

    To view the entire CPSC article on this visit
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/afci.html

    59) The main disconnect for the homes electric power is located outside next to the meter.

    Photo 6  
     

    60) The main panel cover was removed and there were no visible defects noticed in the wiring at this time.

    Photo 128  
     

     
    Plumbing Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): Normal
    Water service: Private
    Service pipe material: Polyethelene
    Supply pipe material: Copper, Galvanized steel
    Vent pipe material: Galvanized steel
    Drain pipe material: Galvanized steel, Cast iron
    Waste pipe material: Cast iron
    61) Some, most, or all of the water supply pipes in this structure are made of galvanized steel. Based on the age of this structure, these pipes may be nearing or may have exceeded their estimated useful life of 40 to 60 years. Internal corrosion and rust can reduce the inside diameter of these pipes over time, resulting in reduced flow and eventually, leaks. The inspector performed a "functional flow test" during the inspection where multiple fixtures were run simultaneously, and found the flow to be adequate. For example, the shower flow didn't decrease substantially when the toilet was flushed. Despite this, and because of their apparent age, these pipes may need replacing at any time.
    62) Recommend having the septic tank inspected. Recommend having the tank pumped if it was last pumped more than 3 years ago.
    63) Electric heat tape noticed on water line running along west wall today. Extension cord use for these heat system is not recommended. Also recommend using a UL approved heat tape along with sealing all wall openings to reduce cold air infiltration and freezing pipes.

    Photo 125  
     

    64) Drain seen in basement floor to grey water from softener and washing machine. Recommend sealing the opening to reduce rodent entry from where it is draining.

    Photo 89  
     

    65) Shutoff valves other than the fixtures themselves are not operated. These valves can break or leak when operated after years of inactivity. Consideration should be given to having these valves checked by a licensed plumber to verify satisfactory operation before the closing, or at least turn these valves before moving in to assure they still work and are not frozen.
    66) Today I performed a Functional Flow of the plumbing system. This both checks for the flow of water at all locations and the drainage of all location drains. Another check is recommended shortly after you get possession of the property. In the process of moving out, the seller can inadvertently bump or loosen trap or drain connections under sinks and block up drains/stools in the process of emptying the home. This cannot be predicted in the limited visual inspection done today. Another check can save you time and reduce the inconvenience of a repair during a move in.
    67) I performed a functional flow test of the well/septic system today. This is
    a performance based test consisting of flushing dye down the system and running the water for 30-40 minutes. If slow drainage occurs, You may consider a full septic inspection including pulling the lid to see where the solid line is and testing the leaching field for back pressure. This would qualify as a full septic inspection. If the property has been vacant for long, the dye test performed may be inconclusive.
    This performance based test is only a part of my functional flow inspection of the plumbing. Professional septic companies recommend cleaning and inspection every 3 years.

    68) Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
    69) The water softener is out of the scope of today's inspection. Recommend asking seller the history of operation (does it work) and how to operate.
     
    Water heater/Well System Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 2005
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Propane
    Capacity (in gallons): 30
    Manufacturer: A.O. Smith
    Model: GCV 30 101
    70) No drain line is installed for the temperature-pressure relief valve. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified plumber should install a drain line as per standard building practices. For example, extending to 6 inches from the floor, or routed so as to drain outside.
    71) The flue pipe is not securely attached to the chimney and should be corrected by a qualified contractor or licensed plumber. The gaps may allow exhaust gases to re-enter the living area if the chimney is blocked.

    The slope of the flue pipe as it exits the foundation wall has a negative slope. This may allow exhaust gases to re-enter the home.
    Recommend correction by a licensed plumber.

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    72) The connection to the draft hood is loose or not secured with sheet metal srews as is common practice todaay. Recommend improvement to reduce chance of separation of this connection.
     
    Private Well Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The inspector does not test private well water for contamination or pollutants, determine if the supply and/or flow are adequate, or provide an estimate for remaining life of well pumps, pressure tanks or equipment. Only visible components are evaluated. The client should have qualified lab test the well water for bacterial contaminants. A qualified well specialist should evaluate the well and perform a yield test.
    Condition of private water supply: Appeared serviceable
    Type of well: Not determined
    Condition of pump: Appeared serviceable, Near, at or beyond service life
    Type of pump: Two
    Location of tank shut off valve: Basement
    Pressure test results: Normal
    Flow test results: Normal
    73) The estimated useful life for most well pumps is 15 to 20 years. Based on information provided to the inspector, or evidence found during the inspection, the well pump may be near this age and may need replacing at any time.
    Although the pump and system was not leaking and worked normally, the board support is rotted and should be replaced soon.

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    74) Well system operated normally today with no concerns noticed.
    75) The well casing, pit were inaccessible due to cement covering. As a result, the inspector was unable to perform a full evaluation. The suspected well location is located under a cement slab on north side of home approx 15 ft from north foundation edge.

    I could not verify today the required 50ft separation between well system and septic system. The main waste line exits the foundation wall on west wall approximately 20ft from northwest corner and the well pump lines exit eh north foundation wall approximately 15 ft from northwest corner.
    Recommend further evaluation when septic is cleaned/inspected to verify this required distance.

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    Heating and Cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 1975?
    Primary heating system energy source: Oil
    Primary heat system type: Forced air, Up draft, Standard efficiency
    Primary A/C energy source: N/A
    Primary Air conditioning type: N/A
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
    Model: Thermopride
    Filter location: At the base of the furnace
    Ignition System: Pilot & Thermocouple
    76) This visual inspection is not intrusive and I am not able to identify many defects within the heat exchanger area without dismantling it. Because of the age and/or condition of this furnace, it appears the unit has not been serviced within the last 12 months. I recommend that a qualified heating and cooling technician inspect the heat exchanger and perform a Carbon Monoxide test before closing escrow.
    77) What appears to be asbestos is visible on some ductwork. It is significantly deteriorated in some areas, and if it is asbestos, it may pose a health hazard and require abatement. Recommend having this material tested at a qualified lab. If the material is found to contain asbestos, recommend consulting with a qualified asbestos abatement contractor or industrial hygenist. For information on asbestos hazards in the home, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/453.html

    Care should be taken if you choose to encapsulate with a heat approved duct tape. Wearing a mask and trying not to disturb it more than necessary is suggested.

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    78) Significant amounts of debris, dirt and/or dust are visible in one or more sections of supply and/or return air ducts. This can be a health hazard, especially for those with allergies or respiratory problems. The Environmental Protection Association (EPA) recommends considering having ducts professionally cleaned when "ducts are clogged with excessive amounts of dust and debris and/or particles are actually released into the home from your supply registers". At a minimum, the visible debris should be thoroughly cleaned. Recommend having a qualified contractor clean the ducts. For more information on duct cleaning in relation to indoor air quality, visit: http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/airduct.html
    79) The connection of the flue pipe to the chimney is loose and should be secured with mortar to reduce exhaust gases escaping back into living area.
    This was noticed in east end of crawl space.

    80) The furnace was shut off at the time of the inspection. I did not attempt to test the furnace due to the storage items too close to the front of the system. I could not fully open the door to evaluate during a test firing.
    Recommend this unit be serviced and evaluated by a licensed HVAC company to evaluate condition prior to closing.

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    81) Grey duct tape has been used to seal furnace duct connections. This type of tape is good for everything except ducts and will become brittle over time and fall off. Recommend replacing with Heat approved duct tape that won't dry out and fall off.
    82) One or more air supply ducts are broken or disconnected. Increased moisture levels in unconditioned spaces and higher energy costs may result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary.

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    83) The estimated useful life for forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement.
    84) The filter(s) for the heating/cooling system should be checked monthly and replaced or washed as necessary.
     
    Crawl space Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Wood, Concrete
    Beam material: Solid wood, Built up wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    Entrance: Basement
    Vapor barrier present: No
    85) Support for the floor system has been added to under dining room improperly. These supports should be reworked to properly support the weight of the floor system.
    Also the west sill plate beam has been pushed in several inches farther on the south end than the north end due to foundation wall shifting. This appears to be caused by poor water control.

    Recommend a closer look and repair by a qualified structural contractor.

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    86) No vapor barrier is installed. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should install a vapor barrier. Standard building practices require the following:

  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.
    87) Cellulose-based debris such as wood scraps, form wood, cardboard and/or paper were found in crawl space. All cellulose-based debris should be removed to avoid attracting wood destroying insects. Debris found in crawl space. All debris should be removed from crawl space
    to reduce chance of indoor air quality problems that may be present
    although environmental issues are out of the scope of today's inspection.

     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Pier or support post material: Wood, Bearing wall, Concrete
    Beam material: Solid wood, Built up wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    Ceiling: Unfinished
    Wall System: Concrete Block
    88) Damage seen to the foundation walls and support posts. There are defects too numerous to mention in this report. The effects of moisture intrusion on the east, west, and north walls have damaged the walls system over time.
    The pictures show foundation walls have failed on west and north sides, weakened on east side, damage in crawl space area on west side with center support posts deteriorated from water entry at base of each post. The basement landing/laundry area floor is leaning and support system needs to be replaced.
    The weakness of the west foundation wall may also affect the connection of the main waste line to the septic tank and allow waste water to re-enter the basement.
    The east/west bearing beam has been affected over time with powder post beetle damage and the support system has been altered. There is a jack near east end and blocks have been improperly installed. This beam and or supports may need to be replaced.
    I recommend a closer look by a qualified structural contractor to discuss remedial repairs needed.

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    89) Guardrails are missing from sections of decks or elevated surfaces with high drop-offs. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. Standard building practices require guardrails to be installed at drop-offs higher than 30 inches, but in some cases it is advised to install them at shorter drop-offs. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install guardrails as necessary and as per standard building practices.

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    90) Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces, or near foundation running underground to another location. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.
    91) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

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    Older style connection is a hazard due to open contact with live wires. Recommend elimination.

    92) Flights of stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.

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    93) Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in sections of the basement. For example, water stains and/or efflorescence on the foundation or floor, water stains at bases of support posts, etc. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.

    There are signs of a wet basement with potential levels of several inches. There is only a grey water drain in the floor that may not be able to handle the water flow during heavy rain periods.
    Improvement of the drainage, slope of ground and repair/replacement of basement walls that have failed will be necessary to reduce this moisture intrusion.
    94) Horizontal cracks noted. These are usually due to soil pressure on the
    outside of the wall. Have fully evaluated by a specialist to determine if the wall system has failed or is needing to be reinforced.

    95) Stair step or vertical cracking was noticed in several areas of the basement wall system today. This can still be a source of moisture intrusion and should be sealed both internally and externally where possible. Also improvement to the slope of the ground and drainage should be addressed to reduce water pressure/entry in these areas.
    96) Current standards would have required GFCI protection for this area since the floor is unfinished concrete.
    This should have been required when panel was installed.
    Recommend adding one for additional safety along with a cover plate for safety..

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    97) Grain sacks and rags seen sealing the northeast sill plate area.

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    98) Moisture problems may exist in the basement as noted in the report and
    should be evaluated/corrected as possible serious issues. Moisture is a
    very destructive force that over time may result in structural issues along
    with health related issues. Environmental issues are out of the scope of
    today's inspection however and should be evaluated separately if warranted.

     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents
    Window Type: Single/Double Hung
    99) Open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices.
    Three-prong, ungrounded receptacles pose an electrocution hazard when using any appliances which have exposed metal shells. They also increase the possible damage to electronics during lightning storms as surge protectors do not work as well.

    There are two reasonably cheap methods for fixing this problem:

    1) Replace the ungrounded three-prong receptacles with two-prong receptacles. This precludes you from using appliances with three-prong cords; do not use the adapters they are unsafe.

    2) Add GFCI protection to the ungrounded circuits. This is a code-legal remedy which provides sufficient safety to install three-prong receptacles. GFCI protection can be installed using a GFCI breaker or a GFCI receptacle as the first device on each ungrounded circuit.

    100) Electric receptacles have reverse-polarity wiring, where the hot and neutral wires are reversed. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    This was seen at range outlet today.

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    101) The range can tip forward, and no anti-tip bracket appears to be installed. This is a safety hazard since the range may tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it, or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free standing ranges since 1985. An anti-tip bracket should be installed to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/remodeling/article/0,1797,HGTV_3659_2017492,00.html
    102) Two-pronged electric receptacles rather than three-pronged, grounded receptacles are installed in one or more interior rooms. They are considered to be unsafe by today's standards and limit the ability to use appliances that require a ground in these rooms. Examples of appliances that require grounded receptacles include:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. A qualified electrian should evaluate and install grounded receptacles as per the client(s)' needs and standard building practices.
    103) Receptacles that serve countertop surfaces have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. This is required by current standards and may not have been required at the time this home was built and is a recommended upgrade. Any previous upgrades or remodels should have introduced this feature when it was done. Recommend adding these for increased safety..
    104) Recommend adding an inexpensive propane alarm near this appliance. Unlike natural gas that rises in air, propane gas pools near the floor like water and would not be as noticeable in case of a leak.
    105) The window is damaged with broken glass or a broken seal in thermal unit that should be repaired/replaced as needed.
    106) Hardware such as hinges, latches or pulls are loose and/or missing on one or more cabinets. Repairs should be made and/or hardware should be replaced as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

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    107) There are no shutoffs under sink. Recommend adding some for convenience.

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    108) Care should be taken to open windows during use of gas range. Gas ovens are a source of carbon monoxide and also hydrogen monoxide and use requires either outside venting or open air space to dilute this dangerous gas.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents
    Walls: Drywall/Plaster, Abitibi
    Window Type: Single/Double Hung
    109) Open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices.
    Three-prong, ungrounded receptacles pose an electrocution hazard when using any appliances which have exposed metal shells. They also increase the possible damage to electronics during lightning storms as surge protectors do not work as well.

    There are two reasonably cheap methods for fixing this problem:

    1) Replace the ungrounded three-prong receptacles with two-prong receptacles. This precludes you from using appliances with three-prong cords; do not use the adapters they are unsafe.

    2) Add GFCI protection to the ungrounded circuits. This is a code-legal remedy which provides sufficient safety to install three-prong receptacles. GFCI protection can be installed using a GFCI breaker or a GFCI receptacle as the first device on each ungrounded circuit.

    Photo 77  
     

    110) Receptacles that serve countertop surfaces have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. This is required by current standards and may not have been required at the time this home was built and is a recommended upgrade. Any previous upgrades or remodels should have introduced this feature when it was done. Recommend adding these for increased safety..
    111) Windows located inside bathtub/shower areas require constant protection from water. A careful look at condition of caulking surrounding the window and protection of wood should be done Some hidden damage may be present if conditions are already deteriorated and should be looked at closer if warranted by a qualified contractor.
    I noticed the window sill is leaning and the bottom framing has a safety bar installed. This bar has likely been leaned on and has pulled it loose slightly. Recommend repair.

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    112) The window is damaged with broken glass or a broken seal in thermal unit that should be repaired/replaced as needed.

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    113) The stool wax ring connection is leaking and should be replaced. High moisture readings were taken in subfloor today.

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    114) There are no isolation valve shutoffs seen under sink today. Recommend adding some for convenience.
    115) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated at bathtub. For example, where the tub base meets the floor below, where the tub surround meets the tub, and/or around the base of the tub spout. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to wall and floor structures.

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    Interior rooms Return to table of contents
    Window Type: Single/Double Hung, Vinyl/Vinyl Wrap, Wood
    Closet Doors: Hinged, BiFold
    116) Open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices.
    Three-prong, ungrounded receptacles pose an electrocution hazard when using any appliances which have exposed metal shells. They also increase the possible damage to electronics during lightning storms as surge protectors do not work as well.

    There are two reasonably cheap methods for fixing this problem:

    1) Replace the ungrounded three-prong receptacles with two-prong receptacles. This precludes you from using appliances with three-prong cords; do not use the adapters they are unsafe.

    2) Add GFCI protection to the ungrounded circuits. This is a code-legal remedy which provides sufficient safety to install three-prong receptacles. GFCI protection can be installed using a GFCI breaker or a GFCI receptacle as the first device on each ungrounded circuit.

    117) Lamp holders or light fixtures with fully or partially exposed bulbs are installed in one or more closets. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Flammable stored items may come into contact with hot bulbs, and hot fragments from broken bulbs may fall on combustible materials. Standard building practices require closet lighting to use fluorescent light fixtures, or to use fully enclosed incandescent fixtures. Installing a compact fluorescent lamp in a lamp holder is not an acceptable practice. A qualified electrician should replace closet lights as necessary and as per standard building practices.

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    118) Abandoned wires near back entrance should be eliminated for safety reasons. Treat these as if they were live until eliminated.

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    119) Recommend installing a deadbolt lock to all exterior doors which will provide more security and may get a slight discount off homeowners insurance.

    The back door doorknob does not latch when closed and the slide bolt is the only way to secure door. Recommend improvement.

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    120) The window is damaged with broken glass or a broken seal in thermal unit that should be repaired/replaced as needed.
    121) Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 7 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years.
    Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit this article: [url]"http://www.nfpa.org/itemDetail.asp?categoryID=278&itemID=20526&URL=Research%20&%20Reports/Fact%20sheets/Fire%20protection%20equipment/Smoke%20alarms

    122) Stains were found in one or more ceiling areas. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found. The stain(s) may be due to past roof and/or plumbing leaks. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this, and monitoring the stained area(s) in the future, especially after heavy or prolonged rain. If elevated moisture is found in the future, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
     
    Gainey Home Inspection Services Inc Indiana License #HI00500083 inspector132@comcast.net 765-744-3005