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Website: http://www.reporthost.com/gainey
Email: inspector132@comcast.net
Phone: (765) 744-3005
8605 W Butternut Rd, Muncie, Indiana 47304
Inspector: Jeff Gainey
Indiana License #HI00500083

  

Home Inspection Report by Gainey Home Services Inc.
Client(s): Sample Inspection over 5000 sq ft
Property address: Anytown, Indiana
Inspection date: 01/22/2011
This report published on Saturday, January 22, 2011 8:21:59 PM EST

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This report is the exclusive property of this Gainey Home Inspections and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Safety ConcernImmediate Safety Concern. Poses a risk of serious injury or worse if not corrected. 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense by a specialist. Estimate of repair estimated to be over $500. 
Livability ConcernRepair or replacement is needed. This may affect livability unless corrected soon and may require repair by a specialist. 
Maintain/RepairMaintenance will be needed. This is considered normal aging and can be added to the "Honey Do List". 
Moisture ControlWater is a destructive force that should be controlled. Improvement is needed to accomplish this. 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance. Preventative maintenance can reduce costly repairs in the future. 
EvaluateA closer look is needed to determine extent of hidden damage or status of condition. Recommend evaluation by a specialist qualified with specialized training. Always get 2-3 estimates. 
MonitorPeriodic checks and repairs are recommended to maintain this system. 
Grandfathered SafetyWhen the home was built, the condition was common. New Standards apply today to make this system safer and is recommended by the inspector to be improved for a safer living environment.. 
CommentInformation that I think may be useful -----or---- a question I would ask of the seller to better understand the operation or service needed for this system. 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
Property & Site
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Upstairs Attic
Garage Attic
Electric service
Plumbing
Water heater/Well System
1st floor SE Master Bedroom Heating and Cooling
Basement Heating and Cooling
Upstairs SE laundry room Heating and Cooling
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Crawl space
Basement
Kitchen
Master Bathroom
Upstairs Southeast Bathroom
Upstairs north center Bathroom
1st Floor East 1/2 Bathroom
Basement Bathroom
Interior rooms

 
Property & Site Return to table of contents

1) BUILDING CODES:
The first thing to remember about building codes is that safety hazards DO NOT read the building code book. Safety hazards don't care about the building code book. Safety hazards just sit and wait to cause you and your family personal injury. Also remember that the building code is developed by nationwide experts in particular topic areas. It is then sent to the state where some homebuilders, a few state experts, and politicians decide what is going to be enforced in the state. It is then sent to the local level where mostly home builders and politicians decide what's going to be enforced locally. It's then given to the code enforcement inspectors to interpret according to how they read the code. In addition, the local code often lags several years behind the national codes.

The building code is not a lofty standard. It is the bare minimum legal standard that a home builder, electrician, plumber, etc, must comply with. To do anything less would be illegal.

I serve a large area of Indiana with many different building code enforcement authorities, each with their own individual interpretations of the national and state building codes based on their local politics and beliefs. I cannot be completely conversant with each and every building code enforcement authority's interpretation of the national building codes; therefore I do not perform code compliance inspections nor guarantee that all items are in compliance with governing codes, regulations, ordinances, statutes, covenants and manufacturer specifications. My references and sources for calling out different items as a safety concern or defective or marginal or in need of repair may include the national building codes (International Residential Code / National Electric Code / Uniform Plumbing Code, etc), manufacturer's instructions, the building industry's standards, continuing education, and personal experience.

If the response to an area of concern or a recommendation in my report is, "Well, they didn't have that (or they didn't do that) when the house was built," or that it was "grandfathered", I usually know that. When it comes to home repairs, "Grandfathered" is a term often tossed out by people who care more about their wallet than about you and your family's safety: as in "That 8 inch gap in the balcony railing doesn't need to be fixed because it's grandfathered. It was okay to do it that way when this house was built.” Is it going to comfort you, when your child falls through that gap and is badly injured, that the size of the gap was "Grandfathered"? All "Grandfathered" really means is that no one can "force" you to change it, repair it, or replace it. Only you can choose what level of risk you want to live with. People with young children who could fall thru that 8 inch gap "should" choose to ensure it is changed to a safer gap but no one is going to force a change except you.

Since whatever issue was "grandfathered", our knowledge has increased considerably concerning safety in the home. I believe that you should be safe in your home and that taking care of your home should be as easy as possible. So I will recommend things that they didn't have or do years ago simply to keep you safe or help you take care of your home. What's most important to me is that you and your family are as safe as possible in your home. Only you can choose what level of risk you want to live with and expose your family to.

2) Today's inspection is being done using the Standards of Practice of the
Great Lake Chapter of the American Society of Home Inspectors as a
Guideline.
http://www.ashi.org/inspectors/standards/standards.asp
The inspection contracts and the limitations and standards
specified therein are an integral part of this report. I am also Licensed
by the State of Indiana and my license # is HI00500083.

3) Environmental issues are out of the scope of today's inspection and should
be addressed separately. This inspection will
not result in the information of presence of any environmental hazard that
may be present, although if noticed in the course
of my inspection may be reported as a possible concern. There may be
environmental concerns that although may be present were not seen by the
inspection today since I am not here for that type of inspection.

4) It is beyond the scope of this limited visual inspection to identify every
component in the home subject to warnings and recalls. I do, however, come
across warnings and recalls in my studies that I have shared in this
report. It is also beyond the scope to identify all safety hazards or concerns in the home.
I do my best to share the information that I know will help you and I do not want to mislead you into thinking that I have checked all of the components in this
home for recall information or identified all the safety hazards present in this home.
I found no recalls in the appliances checked today.

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5) Water is a very destructive force and should be controlled on the outside
to reduce problems that may go undetected for some time on the inside/under the house. Drainage patterns should be monitored and improved as needed to carry water away from foundation. Extend leaders to discharge at least 6' away from building to reduce moisture penetration and foundation damage.

6) Moisture problems may exist in the basement/crawl space as noted in the report and should be evaluated/corrected as possible serious issues. Moisture is a
very destructive force that over time may result in structural issues along
with health related issues. Environmental issues are out of the scope of
today's inspection however and should be evaluated separately if warranted.

7) There is a website from Michigan State University that will give repair techniques and hints that may be useful to maintain your new home.
http://www.msue.msu.edu/objects/content_revision/download.cfm/revision_id.500139/workspace_id.-4/master02.html/

There is also a website you should visit that has good information to read
"Before you move in"
http://www.buildingscience.com/documents/primers/bsp-043-read-this-before-you-move-in

 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 1888
Type of building: Single family
Time started: 12PM
Inspection Fee: $900.00
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Client(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Rain
Ground condition: Wet
Front of structure faces: NW
Foundation type: Finished basement, Crawlspace
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Security system, Irrigation system, Water filtration system, Water softener system
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Block, Not visible
Foundation material: Concrete block
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Brick veneer
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Porch: Concrete
Soffit material: Wood
Fascia: Aluminum
8) Trip hazards were found at the driveway where sidewalk meets due to cracks, settlement and/or heaving. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair or replace driveway sections as necessary to eliminate trip hazards.

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9) Here is a NADRA website link to their
"Check Your Deck Safety Guide" for you to self check your deck in the spring.

http://www.nadra.org/consumers/DSM_checklist2008.pdf

10) One or more outdoor electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all outdoor receptacles within six feet six inches of ground level have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
This was noticed at front entrance south of sidewalk.

11) Suggest having the underground downspout drains be checked and cleaned out. These drain tiles can become clogged or break down over time and allow drainage too close to the foundation.
With the poor maintenance seen on the gutter system, blockages are likely.

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12) Gutters are damaged. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should replace or repair gutters where necessary.

There may be some hidden damage to the soffit board in northeast corner over patio. All areas should be checked and shingle edges sealed where drainage can get under the shingle edge.

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13) Soffit boards are damaged or deteriorated in some areas. The shingles on northeast corner over deck should be sealed along bottom edge to reduce further water entry and hidden damage. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

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14) Recommend adding safety railings at stair systems to reduce hazard. This would be required by current standards.

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15) Minor cracks were found in sections of brick veneer. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as repointing mortar to prevent water intrusion and further deterioration in the future.
This was seen at front entrance in 2 places where brick facing is spalling and will soon break off.

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16) The substructure of the deck is excluded from the inspection due to limited access because of the lattice.
I noticed at least one area where critters have made opening larger for access.
Recommend installing plastic on ground to aid in rapid water drainage away from foundation and seal the under deck area with a wire hardware cloth (screening) to keep animals out.

Also it is important in this area to assure the under deck downspout drain is exhausting away from the foundation.

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17) Deterioration seen to the courtyard area that should be corrected soon. The gutter system in northeast corner is leaking onto the light fixture and down around the GFCI receptacle.
It appears the courtyard pools water in this corner during heavy rain periods.
It appears there may be a drain tile exhausting into the southwest crawl space but has been taped off in the past.
Recommend a closer look and repair of the drainage in this area.
Also caulking should be done at the step level to reduce further damage. Some of the brick edge steps are spalling due to water freeze/thaw periods.

Also all of the sliding door screens are hard to work and some are damaged. Some damage seen to the wood doors from pets.

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18) The connection at the ends of the window sill where the two planes meet is cracked and will allow water entry and deterioration. These areas should be checked and caulked with a clear silicone caulk to reduce further water entry behind brick facing.

I also noticed some cracking above the windows on the south wall today. Seal these as well to keep water intrusion from occurring.
Also the areas of steel lintels above windows have gaps and are corroding. Recommend scraping, resealing with paint an caulking gap to reduce water entry.

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19) Decking boards are spaced closer together than 3/8 inch with accumulated organic debris (leaves, fir needles, etc.). This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Debris should be cleaned as necessary to prevent accumulation and resultant rot. If or when the deck boards are replaced, recommend spacing boards so they're at least 3/8 inch apart to allow debris to fall through the cracks rather than accumulate in them.

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20) Recommend Safety Upgrade of GFCI outlet to provide the intended shock protection for damp locations. Today's standards call for all outdoor locations to have GFCI protection.
21) Dryer diffuser is clogged and will not close. Also some minor damage seen to hood section. Repair/replace as needed.

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22) Window sill should be checked for areas where caulking is beginning to fail. Menards sells an Ultima 50 yr caulk that dries clear and will adhere to brick among other things. Recommend improvement.
Also caulk can be used where water is draining beside the gutter cap. This was seen on northwest deck area.

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23) Recommend moving firewood away from foundation to reduce chance of wood destroying insects entering foundation.

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24) Wood boring bees are making holes in your fascia boards on south side.

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25) Outside faucets are missing [url=http://www.abpa.org/Doc/PDF/Intro%20to%20CCC%20Brochure.pdf]backflow prevention devices[/url]. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit: http://www.abpa.org/Doc/PDF/Intro%20to%20CCC%20Brochure.pdf

26) The brick veneer siding has no weep holes. Brick is porous, and weep holes are openings in the brick mortar low on the wall that provide drainage for rainwater that has intruded through the brick into the space between brick and wall sheathing. When installed, these are combined with flashing between the sheathing and bricks which lead the collected moisture out the weep holes. There is no way to get into this space behind the brick and make a determination about moisture issues there is beyond the scope of the visual inspection. Care should be given to assure that all cracks and joints area properly sealed to reduce moisture intrusion behind facing around windows.
27) Recommend cleaning deck(s) and railing(s) and treating with a preservative claiming to waterproof, block ultraviolet light, and stop mildew. Consumer Reports recommends these products:

  • Cabot Decking Stain and PTW Stain
  • Olympic Water Repellent Deck Stain
  • Thompson's House and Deck Stain
  • Wolman PTW Deck Stain
  • Akzo Sikkens Cetol DEK
  • Benjamin Moore Moorwood Clear Wood Finish
  • DAP Woodlife Premium
  • Olympic Natural Look Protector Plus
    28) Current standards would prohibit building seats along deck edge that are easy to climb. This was not required when the home was built and would be considered a grandfathered item.

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    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed, Viewed from eaves on ladder, Viewed from ground with binoculars
    Roof type: Hipped
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 20yrs
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    29) The roof surface material appears to be near the end of its service life and will likely need replacing in the next 2-4 years. As the shingles age further, they will continue to lose their granular protection, become brittle and become prone to wind damage. Some patching has already been done in the southwest area in several areas along with missing shingles requiring attention.
    The client(s) should budget for a replacement roof surface.

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    30) One or more composition shingles are damaged, deteriorated and/or missing, and should be replaced. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    31) One or more composition shingles have raised, most likely due to nails that have loosened. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as reseating nails.
    32) With the tree presence near the home, I recommend adding a gutter mesh system to reduce maintenance and improve the drainage away from the foundation.
    33) The flashing areas of the penetrations around vent stacks and chimney are in good condition today. No visible signs or concerns viewing them today from roof surface.
    34) Debris has accumulated in gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.

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    35) When this roof is replaced, recommend a complete "tear off", where all existing layers of roofing are removed before installing new roofing materials. For 20-year rated composition shingles, additional layers of material reduce the new roof material's lifespan as follows:

  • 16-20 years - First roof
  • 12-16 years - Second layer on existing roof

    Removing existing roofing materials will significantly increase the cost of the next roof.
     
    Garage Return to table of contents
    Walls: Drywall/Plaster
    Window Type: Casement
    Walls: Drywall/Plaster
    36) The vehicle door has an electric opener installed, and the manual lock mechanism on the door hasn't been disabled. Damage or injury may occur if the vehicle door opener is operated with the manual lock engaged. A qualified contractor should disable or remove the lock mechanism. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html or http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html

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    37) Additional information can be found at the underwriter laboratories website on garage door safety and testing.
    http://www.ul.com/consumers/garagedoors.html

    38) GFCI protection not found today in the garage receptacles. Current standards require this protection in this area. Recommend installing these for added protection.
    Current standards also require all outlets to be GFCI protected, even the ceiling mounted ones usually dedicated to the garage opener. Recommend the upgrade.

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    39) No infared "photo eye" devices are installed for the vehicle door's electric door opener. They've been required on all vehicle door openers since 1993 and improve safety by triggering the vehicle door's auto-reverse feature without need for the door to come in contact with the object, person or animal that's preventing it from closing. Recommend considering having a qualified contractor install these devices for improved safety. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html or http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html
    40) The auto-reverse mechanism on the vehicle door openers are inoperable because the opener is older than the safety standard. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. Recommend upgrading to a newer opener to provide the intended safety.
    For more information on garage door safety issues, visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html or http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html

    41) I noticed fluorescent lighting in the garage today. This lighting may not work properly or be dependable under 50 degrees due to the cold limit on the ballast. Recommend changing over to another type of lighting for convenience and safety.
    One of the units are needing new bulbs or ballast today.

    42) Ceiling stains noticed from previous leak but measured dry today. This could have been from upstairs bath or roof mechanical vent.

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    43) The doors were manually tested today all three worked normally.
    44) Windows that were built to open, will not open, beause the handle for crank is missing. Recommend asking seller if they can provide all missing handles.
    45) The attic hatch was opened to gain access today. There is another upstairs closet wall door for access.

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    46) Storage items around the perimeter limit a visual inspection today and some areas were not checked as a result. Recommend a closer look once everything is moved out.

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    Upstairs Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Viewed from hatch, Traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Mineral wool loose fill
    Insulation depth: 12 inches
    Insulation estimated R value: R30_______________
    47) No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.

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    48) No weatherstrip is installed around the attic access hatch. Weatherstrip should be installed around the hatch to prevent heated interior air from entering attic.
    49) Storage boxes/items which restrict a visual inspection may also have
    damaged wire sheathing. Once objects have been moved, a careful look at wiring condition is recommended in this area used for storage. Improve as needed for safety.
    No concerns noticed in main attic area today. Ventilation appears normal with both intake and exhaust vents open today. Insulation levels are not to the depth of today's standards but are adequate at approx an R30 rating.

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    Garage Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Insulation material: Mineral Wool loose fill
    Insulation depth: 6 inches
    Insulation estimated R value: R19_______________
    50) Evidence of "light to moderate" rodent infestation (Bats) was found in one or more areas. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines this as less than 20 feces per square foot. Rodent infestation may be a safety hazard due to the risk of contracting Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). HPS is a rare (only 20-50 cases per year in the United states) but deadly (40% mortality rate) disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. For example, from sweeping up rodent droppings.

    Recommend following guidelines in the CDC's Clean Up, Trap Up, Seal Up article for eradicating rodents, cleaning up their waste and nesting materials, and preventing future infestations. While Hanta virus is believed to survive less than one week in droppings and urine, specific precautions should be taken during clean up. The client(s) may wish to consult with a qualified, licensed pest control operator for eliminating the infestation. A qualified licensed abatement contractor or industrial hygenist could be contacted for clean up. If the infestation was minimal, clean up of rodent waste and nesting materials in non-living spaces (crawl spaces and attics) may not be necessary, or may be performed for aesthetic reasons only (odor and appearance).

    It appears from the signs at soffit cardboard holding insulation back, the entry points could be from the soffits.

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    51) The ceiling insulation's R rating is less than what's recommended for this area. Current standards require an R49 rating in the attic while today's insulation level measured about an R30.

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    52) Storage boxes/items which restrict a visual inspection may also have
    damaged wire sheathing. Once objects have been moved, a careful look at wiring condition is recommended in this area used for storage. Improve as needed for safety.

    53) Some storage items noticed today over garage. There are also some screening and cabinet quality wood pieces and cherry wood floor pieces seen today.

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    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Underground
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200 each panel
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of sub panels: Garage
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 200 each panel
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed, Aluminum multi-strand
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    Room for Expansion: Yes
    54) Since the main disconnects are located under the meter outside, these distribution panels are considered sub panels. Neutral and equipment ground conductors are combined at the sub-panel. This should only occur at the main disconnect, and is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. Neutral conductors should be attached to a "floating" neutral bar not bonded to the panel, while grounding conductors should be attached to a separate grounding bar bonded to the sub panel.
    While these panels were set up correctly and most of the wires are in their proper locations, each distribution panel has had wires added improperly.
    A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

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    55) Bushings are missing from where wires enter holes in the left service panel. This is a safety hazard since the wiring insulation can be cut or abraded on the metal edge of the hole(s). A qualified electrician should install bushings where missing.

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    56) There is a low voltage device inside the panel. The wiring for this device is only rated at 12 volts and is not allowed in a high voltage panel Typical installations have these installed on a junction box either in the attic over garage opener or on wall near panel enclosure. Recommend correction of this by a licensed electrician.
    This was only seen in the left panel today.

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    57) One or more overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses) are "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire. This is a safety hazard since the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks and fires may result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    This was seen in the left panel only today.

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    58) One or more knockouts have been removed inside the main service panel where no wires and bushings are installed, and no cover(s) have been installed to seal the hole(s). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. A qualified electrician should install knockout covers where missing.
    This was seen in both service panels today.

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    59) The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in the main service panels are incomplete. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
    60) I could not verify bonding of the water pipes to the electric ground system today. Equipment bonding is required even though parts of the service lines have been replaced with plastic water line to protect against equipment grounding faults across metal objects. Recommend bonding of the remaining metal components be verified and corrected if necessary by a licensed electrician.
    61) A "GFCI" is a ground fault circuit interrupter. A ground fault circuit interrupter is an inexpensive electrical device that, if installed in household branch circuits, could prevent over two-thirds of the approximately 300 electrocutions still occurring each year in and around the home. Installation of the device could also prevent thousands of burn and electric shock injuries each year.

    The GFCI is designed to protect people from severe or fatal electric shocks. Because a GFCI detects ground faults, it can also prevent some electrical fires and reduce the severity of others by interrupting the flow of electric current.

    Read more: [urlhttp://www.doityourself.com/stry/gfci#ixzz0geGO85gi/url]

    Here is a link telling you when they were required at each location;
    [urlhttp://www.castlecheck.com/Charlotte_Home_Inspectors_1_NPI/General-Information/GFCI%20OUTLETS%20NEC.pdf/url]

    62) Problems in home wiring, like arcing and sparking, are associated with more than 40,000 home fires each year. These fires claim over 350 lives and injure 1,400 victims annually.

    A new electrical safety device for homes, called an arc fault circuit interrupter or AFCI, is expected to provide enhanced protection from fires resulting from these unsafe home wiring conditions.

    Typical household fuses and circuit breakers do not respond to early arcing and sparking conditions in home wiring. By the time a fuse or circuit breaker opens a circuit to defuse these conditions, a fire may already have begun.

    Several years ago, a CPSC study identified arc fault detection as a promising new technology. Since then, CPSC electrical engineers have tested the new AFCIs on the market and found these products to be effective.

    Requiring AFCIs

    AFCIs are already recognized for their effectiveness in preventing fires. The most recent edition of the National Electrical Code, the widely-adopted model code for electrical wiring, will require AFCIs for bedroom circuits in new residential construction, effective January 2002.

    Future editions of the code, which is updated every three years, has expanded coverage to include all living area rooms.

    I recommend upgrading to these for additional safety against fires.

    To view the entire CPSC article on this visit
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/afci.html

    63) The main disconnect for the homes electric power is located outside next to the meter in two panels on each side of meter.
    Recommend trimming tree only as needed for quick access to main shutoffs.

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    Plumbing Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): Normal
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Basement
    Location of main water meter: street
    Location of main fuel shut-off: Electric disconnects outside
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Plastic
    Drain pipe material: Plastic, Not visible
    Waste pipe material: Plastic
    64) The clothes dryer is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information on dryer safety issues, see http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html
    While the upstairs dryer uses plastic hose, the 1st floor unit uses foil. Both kinds should be replaced for safety reasons.

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    65) The opening for the upstairs laundry chute has a mattress or pillow stuffed in to it. Recommend a door or gate to eliminate hazard of child falling into it.

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    66) No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection device is visible for the sump pump electric supply. A qualified electrician should determine if a GFCI protection device (receptacle or circuit breaker) exists for the sump pump and install one if missing to reduce the danger of electric shock.

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    67) The 1st floor laundry room north counter wall receptacle should be upgraded to a GFCI receptacle for safety reasons as required by current standards.

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    68) The washing machine is installed over a finished living space and has no catch pan or drain installed. These are not commonly installed, but they are recommended to prevent water damage to finished interior spaces below if or when the washing machine leaks, overflows or is drained. This is especially important in upstairs laundry rooms due to potential damage to first floor finished walls. Recommend having a qualified contractor install both a catch pan and drain for both upstairs and 1st floor laundry rooms.

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    69) The sump pump was operational today. The sump pump is properly setup in bottom of pit although the cover has beem removed and stored behind softener. Recommend replacing the cover.
    Also a backup system is present in the form of a battery backup system. . A battery backup typically used will allow power for approximately 8-10 hours and requires another pump sitting in the pit.
    Also available are water powered backup to control the water in case of a power outage. This upgrade is powered from the city water pressure and is an investment of approximately $800 installed.

    Recommend asking seller history of sump pump usage in the past.

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    70) Shutoff valves other than the fixtures themselves are not operated. These valves can break or leak when operated after years of inactivity. Consideration should be given to having these valves checked by a licensed plumber to verify satisfactory operation before the closing, or at least turn these valves before moving in to assure they still work and are not frozen.
    71) Today I performed a Functional Flow of the plumbing system. This both checks for the flow of water at all locations and the drainage of all location drains. Another check is recommended shortly after you get possession of the property. In the process of moving out, the seller can inadvertently bump or loosen trap or drain connections under sinks and block up drains/stools in the process of emptying the home. This cannot be predicted in the limited visual inspection done today. Another check can save you time and reduce the inconvenience of a repair during a move in.
    72) Here is a website that will provide you more information concerning the quality of your public water supply.
    http://www.ewg.org/tap-water/welcome

    73) Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
     
    Water heater/Well System Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 2008
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Electricity
    Capacity (in gallons): 2-40 gal units
    Manufacturer: State
    Model: BOTH UNITS ARE ES640DORT
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 136 degrees
    74) The hot water temperature is greater than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of scalding. The thermostat should be adjusted so the water temperature doesn't exceed 120 degrees. For more information on scalding dangers, visit http://www.tap-water-burn.com/
    75) Water Heaters with metal piping need a bonding jumper between the hot and cold water lines. This provides the required bonding of the interior metal water piping system to ground. The water heater may not provide a current path in the event the piping becomes energized. Recommend further evaluation and correction if needed by a licensed plumber or electrician.
     
    1st floor SE Master Bedroom Heating and Cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 1989
    Primary heating system energy source: Electric
    Primary heat system type: Heat pump
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Heat pump
    Distribution system: Flexible ducts
    Model: Tetco
    Filter location:
    76) System operated within the normal temperature range today. Recommend seasonal servicing. Advise Annual Preventive maintenance agreement from a local contractor.

    I was not able to fully evaluate this unit today due to closet full of pictures, mirrors and stored items. Although this unit performed normally today when tested from thermostat, I recommend a heating company evaluate condition of pump housing and electrical/fan unit before closing.

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    77) Electric backup furnace for heat pump system operated normally today when tested. Wiring inside cabinet appears to be in good condition and should be checked seasonally by qualified HVAC company. Advise Annual Preventive maintenance agreement from a local contractor.
     
    Basement Heating and Cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 1989
    Primary heating system energy source: Electric
    Primary heat system type: Heat pump
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Heat pump
    Distribution system: Flexible ducts
    Model: TETCO #AP52-G SER # 561589
    Filter location: At the base of the furnace
    78) Geo Thermal heat pump system operated within the normal temperature range today. Recommend seasonal servicing. System is older and nearing end of typical life expectancy. Recommend seasonal servicing to prolong useful life and service.

    The unit shows signs of repairs in the past in the electrical compartment but no concerns seen today.
    There are also markings on unit identifying repairs on 10/29/2009 like the other unit.

    The water pumps have corrosion on both units and may have leaks associated with this moisture.

    Recommend unit be serviced before closing to repair as needed.
    The cabinet should be cleaned up and sanded/painted after unit is repaired to alert you if any water leak develop.

    A website that explains how this unit operates is listed here for your use.
    http://www.hometips.com/cs-protected/guides/heatpumps/how_heatpumps_work.html

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    79) The light bulb is burnt out in the basement utility closet.
    80) The filter(s) for the heating/cooling system should be checked monthly and replaced or washed as necessary.
    81) The estimated useful life for heat pumps is 15 to 20 years. This heat pump appears to be at this age or older and should be seasonally serviced to prolong its useful life.
     
    Upstairs SE laundry room Heating and Cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 1989
    Primary heating system energy source: Electric
    Primary heat system type: Heat pump
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Heat pump
    Distribution system: Flexible ducts
    Model: Tetco # AP2B-8 SER # 568389
    Filter location:
    82) Recommend sealing the opening cut into duct plenum to improve efficiency of the system.

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    83) Geo Thermal heat pump system operated within the normal temperature range today in heat capacity. Cooling was not able to be checked today due to outside temperatures. Recommend seasonal servicing. System is older and nearing end of typical life expectancy. Recommend seasonal servicing to prolong useful life and service. This is a specialized system that requires periodic checks to maintain units.
    This system has been repaired on 10/28/09 for refrigerant leak.
    The systems electrical panel and pump box were in good condition today with no concerns noticed.

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    84) The filter(s) for the heating/cooling system should be checked monthly and replaced or washed as necessary.
    85) The estimated useful life for heat pumps is 15 to 20 years. This heat pump appears to be at this age or older and should be seasonally serviced to prolong its useful life.
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Masonry
    Chimney type: Masonry
    86) The chimney has a metal cap and has a rain/pest screened cover installed. There were no concerns seen today from roof level.
    Flashing's should be checked when shingles are replaced.

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    87) All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary. I recommend a level 2 inspection for this fireplace for safety reasons as is recommended by the National Fire Prevention Association. More information is available at this website:
    http://www.csia.org/pressroom/press-inspection-levels-explained.htm

    Fireplace appears to be rarely used as no creosote buildup was seen.
    The damper was open which allow conditioned air to escape. Recommend closing damper when not in use.

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    Crawl space Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed, Partially traversed
    Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt Rigid Styrofoam
    Pier or support post material: Concrete
    Beam material: Built up wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    Entrance: Outside
    88) While there are some homes that need the ventilation of the crawl space to reduce moisture buildup in the crawl space, keep in mind the way moisture travels.
    MOISTURE TRAVELS FROM HOT TO COLD AND FROM LESS TO MORE.
    That being said, When most people are quick to open their crawl vents in the summer, the high humidity from the heat of the summer is actually trying to get into the cool crawl space.
    During the cool spring and fall seasons when everyone has their crawl space vents closed off, the moisture would be trying to get out to the cool air.
    Control of the moisture under the home can influence the entire home's performance during the year. Moisture from the crawl space can affect the attic condition if the ventilation is poor and the moisture gets trapped in the attic.

    89) Ventilation of crawl space would be improved by opening vents in the winter and closing vents in the summer. Moisture/condensation travels from hot to cold. Keep vents closed during the winter only where plumbing is close to lines. Current studies have determined that foundation vents are not needed as much if the moisture is controlled at the downspouts and with a moisture barrier to control water vapor travel. These vents could be closed all year long without any problems occurring as long as improvement to the downspout extensions are extended, moisture barrier is properly installed, and there are no issues with ground table water entry into the crawl.
    90) The vapor barrier needs repair. Exposed soil was found in some areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary so no exposed soil exists. Standard building practices require the following:

  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

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    91) Recommend improvement to the entry well to crawl spaces.
    The dirt level should be 3-4 inches below the bottom edge of opening to reduce water entry into crawl. The cover should be secure with no openings to allow rodent or animal entry. Also recommend covering to reduce water entry onto well with a material that will not deteriorate with the wet environment it will endure.

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    92) There are two separate crawl space areas. Both areas are in normal condition with no concerns noticed. Plastic moisture barrier cover floor controlling moisture travel through the home was present. Also insulation in the form of rigid styrofoam on foundation walls and fiberglass batt insulation seen today. Floor joist and wood components are in good condition.

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    93) The geo thermal heat pump supply and drain lines exhaust the south foundation wall.
    Recommend asking seller if they know location and depth of well servicing the heat pump system in south yard.

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    Basement Return to table of contents
    Pier or support post material: Wood, Bearing wall
    Floor structure above: Not visible
    Ceiling: Unfinished
    Wall System: Drywall/Plaster
    Flooring: Carpet
    94) Recommend having a radon test done. The tri-state area has high levels of radon gas. Learn more information from the EPA.GOV website on this invisible gas that is the 2nd highest cause of lung cancer in the united states.
    95) Moisture problems may exist in the basement as noted in the report and should be evaluated/corrected as possible serious issues. Moisture is a very destructive force that over time may result in structural issues along with health related issues. Environmental issues are out of the scope of today's inspection however and should be evaluated separately if warranted.

    Recommend asking seller if any history of water intrusion into basement is known.

    96) Much of the basement is finished off and conceals the building techniques used. The report is based on the only unfinished part of the basement accessible today.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    97) Light fixtures are loose or installed in a substandard way. A qualified contractor or electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so light fixtures are securely mounted and installed in accordance with the manufacturer's installation instructions.
    Under cabinet lighting has open splices not protected inside junction boxes.

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    98) GFCI outlets should be tested regularly with test button. I tested it today and it cut the power as required.

    Although there is a GFCI present, This only protects the single outlet. All remaining outlets are not protected as required by current standards. Recommend the upgrade for safety to protect all counter top outlets as required by current standards.

    99) Under sink area was checked and no active leaks were noticed. These was a limitation due to full cabinet today.
    There is also a water purification system in place but is out of the scope of today's inspection. Recommend asking seller history of how it works and when/how to service.

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    100) The dishwasher was not tested today for operation or leaks because it was full of clean dishes. No signs of concerns noticed under unit today. Recommend asking seller if any problems or concerns are associated with this unit before closing.
     
    Master Bathroom Return to table of contents
    Walls: Drywall/Plaster
    Window Type: Casement
    101) GFCI outlets should be tested regularly with test button. I tested it today and it cut the power as required at both locations.
    102) Periodic check of the ceramic tile grout lines and caulking edges
    especially around the bottom area are recommended to repair any cracks that may appear. This will reduce hidden damage from moisture intrusion.

     
    Upstairs Southeast Bathroom Return to table of contents
    Walls: Drywall/Plaster
    103) GFCI outlets should be tested regularly with test button. I tested it today
    and it cut the power as required.

    104) Periodic check of the ceramic tile grout lines and caulking edges
    especially around the bottom area are recommended to repair any cracks that may appear. This will reduce hidden damage from moisture intrusion.

     
    Upstairs north center Bathroom Return to table of contents
    Walls: Drywall/Plaster
    105) GFCI outlets should be tested regularly with test button. I tested it today and it cut the power as required at both sink locations.
    106) Periodic check of the ceramic tile grout lines and caulking edges
    especially around the bottom area are recommended to repair any cracks that may appear. This will reduce hidden damage from moisture intrusion.

     
    1st Floor East 1/2 Bathroom Return to table of contents
    Walls: Drywall/Plaster
    107) Receptacles that serve countertop surfaces have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. This is required by current standards and would have been required at the time this home was built. Recommend adding these for increased safety..
    108) Mineral Buildup seen on the shutoffs and connections today. This may indicate a minor leak that seals itself up and reopens later. Monitor this location for further buildup/leaks and repair/replace as needed.

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    Basement Bathroom Return to table of contents
    Walls: Drywall/Plaster
    109) One or more sinks are cracked or broken. A qualified plumber should replace the sink(s) where necessary.
    Improper support was given to center of sink when installed and it has cracked along left side.

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    110) GFCI outlets should be tested regularly with test button. I tested it today and it cut the power as required.
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents
    Window Type: Casement
    Closet Doors: Hinged
    111) I noticed some staining around receptacle on south wall of upstairs laundry room. Recommend having a licensed electrician pulling cover and inspecting this receptacle for signs of internal damage.

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    112) One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.
    This was noticed at interior closet doors and southeast office courtyard door.

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    113) Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 7 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years.
    Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit this article: [url]"http://www.nfpa.org/itemDetail.asp?categoryID=278&itemID=20526&URL=Research%20&%20Reports/Fact%20sheets/Fire%20protection%20equipment/Smoke%20alarms

    114) Minor cracks were found in ceilings.. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
    This was noticed in basement today.

    I also noticed a beauty ring in upper ceiling of center living room is missing and should be replaced.

    Photo 127  
     

    115) I noticed the door trim is pulling away from wall at garage entry door.
    Also some drywall has been cut out of closet next to garage. Recommend asking seller history of this damage.

    I also noticed the sliding closet door will not stay on its track and should be repaired/adjusted.

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    116) Basement bedroom by current standards would require 2 forms of egress in case of fire. Since there is only the basement stairs as an egress, it would not conform to current standards. Ideally modifications should be made as necessary, such as installing window(s) to comply with these recommendations. For more information, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=bedroom+window+fire+egress

    117) I noticed two installed central vacuum systems today. These systems are out of the scope of today's inspection. Recommend asking seller whether they work and where the attachments and hoses are located.

    Photo 115  
     

     
    Gainey Home Inspection Services Inc Indiana License #HI00500083 inspector132@comcast.net 765-744-3005