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Green Apple Home Inspections


Email: gahikw@gmail.com
Inspector's email: gahikw@gmail.com
Phone: (208) 703-2947
Inspector's phone: (208) 703-2947

 

Thank you for choosing Green Apple Home Inspection. the following report lists out defects as well as general information found at this dwelling.

Client(s):  Eric and Courtney Fitzpatrick
Property address:  750 N Brownfield Dr
Meridian ID 83642-7628
Inspection date:  Tuesday, July 25, 2017

This report published on Tuesday, July 25, 2017 7:12:12 PM MDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
This report is good only for the day of the inspection and cannot account for defects found after the inspection what the report states is what was seen at the time and day.
By continuing to read this report you agree to handling any objections or disagreements by writing within the first 30 days of the inspection report.
If no mutual agreement is reached, conflict resolution will be solved by arbitration only.
This report is not for resale, unless agreed upon by both the inspector and the client.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
Exterior
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Roof
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Crawl space
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms

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Exterior
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Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Brick veneer, Vinyl
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core steel, Solid core fiberglass, Sliding glass

1) Waterproof cover(s) over one or more electric receptacles are damaged or broken. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. Damaged covers should be replaced where necessary. This was seen specifically at both front and back receptacles.
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2) Conducive conditions Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.
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3) One or more light fixtures are damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair or replace light fixtures where necessary. This was seen at the front coach light surrounding glass.
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4) Conducive conditions The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.
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5) Conducive conditions One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.
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6) One or more crawl space vent screens are damaged and/or deteriorated. Animals such as vermin or pets may enter the crawl space and nest, die and/or leave feces and urine. A qualified contractor should replace damaged or deteriorated screens where necessary using screen material such as "hardware cloth" with 1/4 inch minimum gaps.
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7) Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.
This was seen specifically at the gas line enters into the home.

8) One or more outside faucets are missing handles. Recommend installing handles where missing.
This was seen specifically at the front porch spigot.
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9) Conducive conditions One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
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10) Conducive conditions Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
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11) Conducive conditions The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.
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12) One or more sections of foundation and/or exterior walls are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from vegetation, debris and/or stored items.

Garage
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13) The automatic door closing device (sprung hinges, etc.) on the garage-house door needs adjustment, repair or replacing. The door doesn't close and latch easily and/or completely via the force of the automatic closing device. This door is intended to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces and to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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14) Gaps exist between the garage-house door and the surrounding weatherstrip when the door is closed. Fumes from the garage may enter living spaces as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

15) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing. This was seen ext to the exterior.
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16) The garage vehicle door is damaged or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the door as necessary.
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17) The garage man door to the backyard is missing a standard door knob. Recommend installing a door knob in a addition to the deadbolt currently installed as per standard living practices.
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Attic
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Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
Roof structure type: Trusses
Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
Insulation depth: 12-14 inches
Insulation estimated R value: 38

18) Ceiling insulation is uneven in some areas. This is likely due to someone having walked on or through the insulation. Recommend installing additional insulation where necessary to restore the original R rating.
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Electric service
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Primary service type: Underground
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
System ground: Concrete encased electrode
Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
Branch circuit wiring type: Copper, Aluminum solid-strand
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: Yes
Smoke detectors present: Yes

19) One or more screws are missing from the main service panel cover and should be replaced. Because energized wiring may exist behind the holes with the missing screws, recommend that a qualified, licensed electrician replace these screws, or that care be taken to ensure that the new screws do not come in contact with wiring inside the panel when they are installed. Stock screws from the panel manufacturer should be used, or their equivalent.

20) The electrical panel was in good condition at the time of the inspection.
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Water heater
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Estimated age: 19 years
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Manufacturer: Bradford White

21) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
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22) Conducive conditions Corrosion was found on fittings and/or water supply lines for the water heater. Leaks may exist. A qualified plumbing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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23) The water heater was in working condition at the time of the inspection.

Roof
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Roof inspection method: From the air
Roof type: Gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Estimated age of roof: 19 years
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Adequate

24) Conducive conditions The roof surface material appears to be near the end of its service life and will likely need replacing in the near future, even with repairs. The client(s) should budget for a replacement roof surface, and may want to have a qualified roofing contractor evaluate and attempt to issue a "5 year roof certificate".

25) Conducive conditions Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.

26) Conducive conditions Debris such as leaves, needles, seeds, etc. have accumulated on the roof. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since water may not flow easily off the roof, and may enter gaps in the roof surface. Leaks may occur as a result. Debris should be cleaned from the roof now and as necessary in the future.

27) Conducive conditions Trees are overhanging roof and are within 10 feet of roof vertically. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since organic debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate on the roof surface. Accumulated debris may cause water to enter gaps in the roof surface and leak into attic and/or interior spaces. Trees should be pruned so they are at least 10 feet above roof, or don't overhang the roof.
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28) Conducive conditions Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.

29) The roof and its coverings were in ok condition at the time of the inspection.
See video link below:https://youtu.be/CIG2OgtTtmo

30)  

Heating and cooling
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Estimated age: 19 years
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Distribution system: Flexible ducts
Filter location: In return air duct above furnace

31) Conducive conditions Evidence of a leak was found at the subfloor where the HVAC unit meets the subfloor in the garage. This are was discolored and appeared to be a black residue over the surface and starting up the wall. Recommend having a mold specialist evaluate and suggest any repairs to eliminate any growth from a water leak. This may include a plumbing contractor, HVAC technician, and or carpenter to fully repair.
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32) One or more sections of flex duct are sagging excessively. Most manufacturers, and the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association (SMACNA) recommend that this type of duct sag no more than 1/2" per foot between supports. A qualified heating/cooling contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. This was seen in the crawlspace.

33) Air handler filter(s) should be checked monthly in the future and replaced or washed as necessary.

34) The HVAC was in working condition at the time of the inspection. Also noted was a recent inspection and thorough cleaning by Dowdy's HVAC.
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Plumbing and laundry
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Location of main water shut-off valve: at the meter
Location of main water meter: at the meter
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Polyethelene
Supply pipe material: Polyethelene
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Plastic

35) The plumbing was in good working condition at the time of the inspection.

Crawl space
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Inspection method: Traversed
Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
Pier or support post material: Concrete
Beam material: Solid wood
Floor structure above: Engineered wood joists
Vapor barrier present: Yes

36) Evidence of "light to moderate" rodent infestation was found in one or more areas. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines this as less than 20 feces per square foot. Rodent infestation may be a safety hazard due to the risk of contracting Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). HPS is a rare (only 20-50 cases per year in the United states) but deadly (40% mortality rate) disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. For example, from sweeping up rodent droppings.

Recommend following guidelines in the CDC's Clean Up, Trap Up, Seal Up article for eradicating rodents, cleaning up their waste and nesting materials, and preventing future infestations. While Hantavirus is believed to survive less than one week in droppings and urine, specific precautions should be taken during clean up. The client(s) may wish to consult with a qualified, licensed pest control operator for eliminating the infestation. A qualified licensed abatement contractor or industrial hygienist could be contacted for clean up. If the infestation was minimal, clean up of rodent waste and nesting materials in non-living spaces (crawl spaces and attics) may not be necessary, or may be performed for aesthetic reasons only (odor and appearance).
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37) Insulation under the floor in the crawlspace is damaged, deteriorated, or has fallen down. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary to restore the insulation to its original rating.
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38) Some crawl space areas were inaccessible due to low height (less than 18 inches), ductwork or pipes blocking, standing water, and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
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39) The crawl space was in good dry condition at the time of the inspection.

Kitchen
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40) One or more cabinets doors are not secure. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

41) The light in range hood is inoperable. Recommend replacing light bulb(s) or having repairs made by a qualified contractor as necessary.
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42) The oven light is inoperable. Recommend replacing bulb or having repairs made if necessary by a qualified appliance technician.

43) One or more light fixtures have missing bulbs and could not be fully evaluated. Bulbs may simply need to be installed, or repairs or replacement may be necessary.
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Bathrooms
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44) Conducive conditions Vinyl flooring installed in "wet" areas have gaps between them. The wooden subfloor beneath may be damaged by water intrusion. A qualified contractor should evaluate, make repairs if necessary, and replace flooring with a waterproof floor such as sheet vinyl in wet areas. This was seen specifically int he spare bathroom near the commode.
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45) One or more sink stopper mechanisms are missing, or need adjustment or repair. Stopper mechanisms should be installed where missing and/or repairs should be made so sink stoppers open and close easily. This was seen specifically int he spare bathroom.
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Interior rooms
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46) One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in are loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. tHis w as seen throughout the home.

47) Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 10 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit this article: NFPA urges replacing home smoke alarms after 10 years.
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48) Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing. This was seen primarily in the backyard area.
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49) One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors. This was seen throughout the home.
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50) The lock mechanisms on one or more sliding glass doors are inoperable and/or difficult to operate. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. The exterior of shows that this part of the home can be unlocked by standard key. This unit is inoperable the losing mechanism is missing. recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and make any necessary repairs.

51) One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.
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52) The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. This was seen at the front door and the garage door into the home.
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53) One or more rooms have sliding glass doors that are the only source of ventilation for outside air, and no sliding screen door is installed. Recommend installing sliding screen doors for adequate ventilation when insects are active.

54)   One or more doorstops iOS missing through out the home. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and make any necessary installations of door stops as per standard living practices.
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Thanks again for choosing Green Apple Home Inspection.