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Green Apple Home Inspections


Email: gahikw@gmail.com
Inspector's email: gahikw@gmail.com
Phone: (208) 703-2947
Inspector's phone: (208) 703-2947

 

Thank you for choosing Green Apple Home Inspection. the following report lists out defects as well as general information found at this dwelling.

Client(s):  Ron Schnieder
Property address:  223 S Elder St
Nampa ID 83686-5203
Inspection date:  Saturday, July 01, 2017

This report published on Sunday, July 02, 2017 9:47:21 AM MDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
This report is good only for the day of the inspection and cannot account for defects found after the inspection what the report states is what was seen at the time and day.
By continuing to read this report you agree to handling any objections or disagreements by writing within the first 30 days of the inspection report.
If no mutual agreement is reached, conflict resolution will be solved by arbitration only.
This report is not for resale, unless agreed upon by both the inspector and the client.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Crawl space
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms

View summary


General information
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Report number: 10595
Structures inspected: Garage and dwelling
Type of building: Single family
Time started: 9:30 a.m.
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Client(s), Property owner(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: East
Foundation type: Unfinished basement, Crawlspace
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Security system, Irrigation system, Swimming pool, Hot tub, Private well, Shed, Playground equipment, Sauna, Low voltage outdoor lighting, Central vacuum system, Water filtration system, Water softener system, Built-in sound system, Intercom system, Generator system, Sport court, Sea wall, Outbuildings

1) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:

2) Some wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by furniture and/or stored items. Some areas couldn't be evaluated.

Exterior
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Footing material: Poured in place concrete, Masonry
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete, Concrete block
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood clapboard
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core wood

3) One or more open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices. Replacement of three-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles is not an acceptable solution.
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4) One or more light fixtures are loose or installed in a substandard way. A qualified contractor or electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so light fixtures are securely mounted and installed in accordance with the manufacturer's installation instructions.
IT appears as though a screw is missing from the enclosure to keep it watertight.
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5) One or more hornet, bee and/or wasp nests were found. These can pose a safety hazard. Nest(s) should be removed as necessary.

6) The front address is incomplete. Recommend completing the address information on the home for emergency services.
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7) Conducive conditions Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.

8) Sidewalks and/or patios have significant cracks and/or deterioration in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary.
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9) Conducive conditions One or more downspouts are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should install downspout(s) where missing. Also recommend installing extensions such as splashblocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines as necessary to carry rainwater away from the house.
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10) Conducive conditions One or more gutters are damaged. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should replace or repair gutters where necessary.
This was seen specifically by the garage.
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11) Conducive conditions One or more end caps are missing on gutters. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. End caps should be replaced where missing.
This was seen specifically over the front porch.
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12) Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.
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13) One or more crawl space vent screens are damaged and/or deteriorated. Animals such as vermin or pets may enter the crawl space and nest, die and/or leave feces and urine. A qualified contractor should replace damaged or deteriorated screens where necessary using screen material such as "hardware cloth" with 1/4 inch minimum gaps.
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14) One or more moderate cracks (1/8 inch to 3/4 inch) were found in the foundation. These may be a structural concern, or an indication that settlement is ongoing. The client(s) should consider hiring qualified contractors and/or engineers as necessary for further evaluation. Such contractors may include:
  • Foundation repair contractors who may prescribe repairs, and will give cost estimates for prescribed repairs
  • Masonry contractors who repair and/or replace brick veneer
  • Geotechnical engineers who attempt to determine if settlement is ongoing, and what the cause of the settlement is
  • Structural engineers who determine if repairs are necessary, and prescribe those repairs

  • At a minimum, recommend sealing cracks to prevent water infiltration. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.
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15) Conducive conditions One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
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16) Conducive conditions Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

17) Conducive conditions Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.
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18) Conducive conditions The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.
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19) Stains were found in one or more areas on soffit boards, but no elevated moisture levels were found and the wood appears to be in good condition. Based on the appearance of the roof, these stains may be from past leaks. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future. If moisture is observed, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. This was seen specifically over the garage.
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20) One or more sections of foundation and/or exterior walls are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from vegetation, debris and/or stored items.
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Roof
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Roof inspection method: Viewed from eaves on ladder
Roof type: Gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles, Rolled
Estimated age of roof: 100+ years old
Gutter & downspout material: Plastic
Roof ventilation: Unable to determine (no access to attic spaces)

21) Conducive conditions Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.

22) Conducive conditions Trees are overhanging roof and are within 10 feet of roof vertically. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since organic debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate on the roof surface. Accumulated debris may cause water to enter gaps in the roof surface and leak into attic and/or interior spaces. Trees should be pruned so they are at least 10 feet above roof, or don't overhang the roof.

23) Conducive conditions Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.
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24) The roof and its coverings.
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25)   Areas of the roof where it transitions to the garage. Vertical sections of the roofing were missing or a gap exists. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate, repair and replace as necessary
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Garage
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26) One or more wall and/or ceiling surfaces between the attached garage and interior living spaces have gaps, holes, or missing or inadequate surface materials. These surfaces are intended to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces, and to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so the attached garage wall and ceiling surfaces that adjoin living spaces are tightly sealed and fire rated as per standard building practices. Typically these surfaces require a one-hour fire rating.

27) The automatic door closing device (sprung hinges, etc.) on the garage-house door needs adjustment, repair or replacing. The door doesn't close and latch easily and/or completely via the force of the automatic closing device. This door is intended to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces and to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

28) One or more open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices. Replacement of three-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles is not an acceptable solution.

29) Much of the garage, including areas around the interior perimeter and in the center are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.

30)   Evidence of one or more leaks were seen in the ceiling and wall drywall. Recommend asking the homeowner about any known previous leaks in the garage. Also recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary
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Attic
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Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
Roof structure type: Rafters

31) Most of the attic was inaccessible due to lack of permanently installed walkways, the possibility of damage to insulation, low height and/or stored items and or lack of access. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
See youtube video:
https://youtu.be/dMQgG3qOWss
https://youtu.be/ji9HchR585E

Electric service
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Primary service type: Overhead
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Location of main service switch: on the exterior of the home
Location of sub panels: In the garage
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
System ground: DISCONNECTED
Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
Branch circuit wiring type: Copper
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: Can't verify
Smoke detectors present: Yes
System ground: ***DISCONNECTED***

32) The service drop wires are less than eight feet above one or more sections of flat roof that can be walked on. This is a safety hazard for shock since people on the roof may come into contact with the service drop wires. The utility company and/or a qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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33) The service mast is loose and/or inadequately supported due to loose, missing and/or defective hardware such as brackets, clamps, screws or bolts. A qualified contractor or electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary so the service mast is adequately supported.
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34) The home and most outlets are operating with on an open ground system. A potential grounding rod was seen in the garage and appears to have become disconnected. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair the electrical system to be grounded.
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35) The main service panel cover couldn't be removed due to lack of access from stored items and/or debris. This panel wasn't fully evaluated.
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Water heater
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Estimated age: 4-8 years

36) The water heater was in good working condition at the time of the inspection.
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Heating and cooling
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Estimated age: 20 years old
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air, High efficiency
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts, Flexible ducts
Manufacturer: Fridgetdaire

37) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html

38) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
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39) Insulation is missing on one or more heating/cooling ducts in unconditioned spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install insulation as necessary and as per standard building practices.
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40) Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.

41) Air handler filter(s) should be checked monthly in the future and replaced or washed as necessary.

42) The HVAC was in working condition at the time of the inspection.

Plumbing and laundry
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Location of main water shut-off valve:
Water service: Public
Supply pipe material: Galvanized steel

43) Some, most, or all of the water supply pipes in this structure are made of galvanized steel. Based on the age of this structure, these pipes may be nearing or may have exceeded their estimated useful life of 40 to 60 years. Internal corrosion and rust can reduce the inside diameter of these pipes over time, resulting in reduced flow and eventually, leaks. The inspector performed a "functional flow test" during the inspection where multiple fixtures were run simultaneously, and found the flow to be adequate. For example, the shower flow didn't decrease substantially when the toilet was flushed. Despite this, and because of their apparent age, these pipes may need replacing at any time.
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44) The inspector was not able to find the main water shut-off valve. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) to determine if a shut-off valve exists, find it themselves, or hire a qualified plumber if necessary to find it. If no shut-off valve is found for the structure, then recommend having a qualified plumber install one to more easily allow the water supply to be turned off in the event of an emergency, such as when a supply pipe bursts.

Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
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Chimney type: Masonry

45) The masonry chimney's mortar is deteriorated and should be repaired to prevent further, significant deterioration. Recommend having a qualified chimney service contractor or mason evaluate chimney and repair as necessary. This will likely require repointing the mortar.
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Crawl space
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Inspection method: Partially traversed
Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
Pier or support post material: Masonry
Beam material: Solid wood
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
Vapor barrier present: No

46) No insulation is installed under the floor in the crawl space. Recommend that a qualified contractor install R19 or better (6" thick fiberglass batt) insulation under the floor for better energy efficiency.
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47) Conducive conditions Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the crawl space. For example, sediment stains on the vapor barrier or foundation, and/or efflorescence on the foundation. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the crawl space. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the crawl space. The crawl space should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in crawl spaces include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

Ideally, water should not enter crawl spaces, but if water must be controlled after it enters the crawl space, then typical repairs include installing trenches, gravity drains and/or sump pump(s) in the crawl space.

48) Wooden support posts are not securely fastened to beams above. This is a safety hazard since they can separate during a seismic event. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as installing metal ties, bracing with lumber and/or plywood gussets as per standard building practices.
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49) Conducive conditions No vapor barrier is installed. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should install a vapor barrier. Standard building practices require the following:
  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

  • Better building practices require that:
  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.

50) Some crawl space areas were inaccessible due to low height (less than 18 inches), ductwork or pipes blocking, standing water, and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.

Basement
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Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
Pier or support post material: Masonry
Beam material: Solid wood
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists

51) Some wiring is loose, unsupported, or inadequately supported. Standard building practices require non-metallic sheathed wiring to be trimmed to length, attached to runners or to solid backing with fasteners at intervals of 4-1/2 ft. or less. Fasteners should be installed within 12 inches of all enclosures. A qualified, licensed electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, trim wire to length and/or install staples as needed. This appears to be recent rolex type wiring.
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52) Conducive conditions Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. For example, water stains and/or efflorescence on the foundation or floor, water stains at bases of support posts, etc. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.

53) Wooden support posts are not securely fastened to beams above. This is a safety hazard since they can separate during a seismic event. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as installing metal ties, bracing with lumber and/or plywood gussets as per standard building practices.
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54) Lock mechanisms or locksets at one or more exterior entrance doors are inoperable and/or difficult to operate. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace locksets or lock mechanisms as necessary, so entry doors can be secured, and are easy to open, close and latch.

55) One or more exterior entrance doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

Kitchen
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56) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
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57) Conducive conditions Floor tiles installed in "wet" areas have gaps between them. The wooden subfloor beneath may be damaged by water intrusion. A qualified contractor should evaluate, make repairs if necessary, and replace flooring with a waterproof floor such as sheet vinyl in wet areas.
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58) Drawers and cabinet fronts are difficult to open and or close in one or more cabinets. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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59) One or more sink drains use flexible drain pipe. This type of drain pipe is more likely to clog than smooth wall pipe. Recommend having a qualified plumber replace this pipe with standard plumbing components (smooth wall pipe) to prevent clogged drains. This was seen in the kitchen with no garbage disposal.

60) One or more kitchen appliances appear to be near, at, or beyond their intended service life of 10 to 15 years. Recommend budgeting for replacements as necessary.

Bathrooms
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61) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
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62) Conducive conditions One or more toilets are loose. A qualified contractor should remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repairs if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking.
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63) Conducive conditions Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated at one or more bathtubs. For example, where the tub base meets the floor below, where the tub surround meets the tub, and/or around the base of the tub spout. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to wall and floor structures.
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Interior rooms
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64) One or more open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices. Replacement of three-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles is not an acceptable solution.

65) Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 10 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit this article: NFPA urges replacing home smoke alarms after 10 years.

66) An insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

67) One or more exterior entrance doors are of hollow-core construction rather than solid core. This may represent a security hazard since these doors are easily broken. Hollow-core, exterior entrance doors should be replaced with solid core doors by a qualified contractor. This was seen specifically seen as you enter the home from the garage.

68) The sash spring mechanism(s) in one or more windows are broken or loose. A qualified contractor or service technician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so the window(s) operate as intended (open easily, stay open without support, close easily, etc.).
This was seen in the kitchen.

69) One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.
This was seen at the front door specifically.
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70) One or more windows that were built to open, will not open, or open only minimally due to their being painted shut, damaged and/or deteriorated in some way. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary so windows open fully, and open and close easily. This was seen in the office.
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71) One or more doors have no lockset installed. Locksets should be installed where missing.
This was seen at the rear entrance into the garage.
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72) The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

73) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by locating a switch(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
This was seen in the pantry.

74)   The front entrance middle switch, had no response. Recommend asking the homeowner about its function. If no answer can be found recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Thanks again for choosing Green Apple Home Inspection.