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First Choice Home Inspections


2222 Woodland Ave. 
Augusta, Ga 30904
Inspector: Corey Johnson

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Client(s):  Allen Parker
Property address:  3649 Bermuda Circle
Augusta, GA 30909
Inspection date:  Tuesday, October 20, 2015

This report published on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 5:37:32 PM EDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Crawl space
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms


General information
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Report number: 2048
Type of building: Fourplex
Time started: 2:15
Time finished: 4:00
Inspection Fee: 325.00
Present during inspection:
Occupied: No, but furnishings and stored items are present
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: North
Main entrance faces: North
Foundation type: Crawlspace

1) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygenists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:

Exterior
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Footing material: Masonry
Foundation material: Concrete block
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Brick veneer
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core wood

2) One or more large trees on the property may be likely to fall on the structure, and are a potential safety hazard. Recommend consulting with a qualified arborist to determine if tree(s) need to be removed and/or pruned.

3) Conducive conditions One or more downspouts are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should install downspout(s) where missing. Also recommend installing extensions such as splashblocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines as necessary to carry rainwater away from the house.

4) Conducive conditions One or more gutters are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should install gutters and downspouts where missing. Also, extensions such as splashblocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines should be installed as necessary to carry rain water away from the house.

5) Conducive conditions Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

6) Conducive conditions The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.

7) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

8) One or more light fixtures have missing bulbs and could not be fully evaluated. Bulbs may simply need to be installed, or repairs or replacement may be necessary.

Roof
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Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars
Roof type: Hipped, Cross-hipped
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Estimated age of roof: 5-10years
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Adequate

Attic
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Inspection method: Traversed
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
Insulation depth: 11
Insulation estimated R value: 30

9) Debris or household items present.

10) No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.

11) No weatherstrip is installed around the attic access hatch. Weatherstrip should be installed around the hatch to prevent heated interior air from entering attic.

Electric service
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Primary service type: Overhead
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 200
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: Front bedroom
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
Smoke detectors present: Yes, Only one working

Water heater
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Estimated age: 8-10 years
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Manufacturer: Ever Kleen
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 85 degrees

12) Conducive conditions A water heater is installed over finished living spaces and has no catch pan and drain installed. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a catch pan and drain to prevent water damage to finished interior spaces below if/when the water heater develops a leak or is drained.

13) No drip leg is installed on the water heater gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the water heater components. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.

Heating and cooling
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Estimated age: 16 years
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
Distribution system: Flexible ducts
Manufacturer: Rheem
Filter location: In return air duct above furnace
Last service date: unknown

14) The estimated useful life for air conditioning compressors is 8 to 15 years. This unit appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

15) The furnace did not respond when its controls were operated. This system was not fully evaluated. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) as to how it operates and have a qualified heating and cooling contractor evaluate and make repairs if necessary.

16) Could not locate the furnace. When heat was powered on there were no response.
Condenser outside did not run consistently. Recommend servicing by a certified HVAC technician.

17) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.

18) The cooling fins on the air handler's evaporator coils are dirty. This may result in reduced efficiency and higher energy costs. Some sources claim that energy efficiency is degraded by about five percent each year as the coils get dirtier due to accumulated dust and grime. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should clean the evaporator coils as necessary.

19) The cooling fins on the outdoor condensing unit's evaporator coils are dirty. This may result in reduced efficiency and higher energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should clean the evaporator coils as necessary.

20) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are too close to the outdoor condensing unit. Standard building practices require that there be at least 12 inches of clearance on all sides and at least four to six feet above. Inadequate clearances around the condensing unit can result in reduced efficiency, increased energy costs and/or damage to equipment. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain these clearances.

Plumbing and laundry
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Water pressure (psi): 85 psi
Location of main water shut-off valve: Meter
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Copper
Supply pipe material: Galvanized steel
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Drain pipe material: Galvanized steel
Waste pipe material: Plastic

21) The water supply pressure is greater than 80 psi. Pressures above 80 psi may void warranties for some appliances such as water heaters or washing machines. Flexible supply lines to washing machines are more likely to burst with higher pressures. Typically the pressure cannot be regulated at the water meter. Recommend having a qualified plumber evaluate and make modifications to reduce the pressure below 80 psi. Installing a pressure reducing valve on the main service pipe is a common solution to this problem. If one exists, then it should be adjusted for lower pressures.

Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
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Fireplace type: Masonry
Chimney type: Masonry

22) A significant amount of creosote (1/8 inch or more) is visible in the fireplace flue. A qualified chimney service contractor should inspect, clean, and repair if necessary now and annually in the future.

23) All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.

Crawl space
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Inspection method: Partially traversed
Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
Pier or support post material: Masonry
Beam material: Solid wood
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
Vapor barrier present: No

24) Evidence of "light to moderate" rodent infestation was found in one or more areas. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines this as less than 20 feces per square foot. Rodent infestation may be a safety hazard due to the risk of contracting Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). HPS is a rare (only 20-50 cases per year in the United states) but deadly (40% mortality rate) disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. For example, from sweeping up rodent droppings.

Recommend following guidelines in the CDC's Clean Up, Trap Up, Seal Up article for eradicating rodents, cleaning up their waste and nesting materials, and preventing future infestations. While Hanta virus is believed to survive less than one week in droppings and urine, specific precautions should be taken during clean up. The client(s) may wish to consult with a qualified, licensed pest control operator for eliminating the infestation. A qualified licensed abatement contractor or industrial hygenist could be contacted for clean up. If the infestation was minimal, clean up of rodent waste and nesting materials in non-living spaces (crawl spaces and attics) may not be necessary, or may be performed for aesthetic reasons only (odor and appearance).

25) Conducive conditions No vapor barrier is installed in some areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should install a vapor barrier where missing. Standard building practices require the following:
  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

  • Better building practices require that:
  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.

Kitchen
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26) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

27) One or more cabinets are not securely fastened to the wall. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of the cabinet(s) falling. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

28) Conducive conditions One or more exhaust fans is inoperable or provides inadequate air flow. Moisture may accumulate as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace the fan or make repairs as necessary.

29) The range hood fan is inoperable. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the fan or the range hood as necessary.

30) The under-sink food disposal is inoperable. A qualified plumber or contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the food disposal as necessary.

31) Drawers are difficult to open and close in one or more cabinets. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

32) Water standing in sink because garbage disposal is not working.

33) Minor damage and/or deterioration was found at countertops in one or more areas. The client(s) should evaluate and consider having repairs made, and/or countertops replaced where necessary.

34) One or more kitchen appliances appear to be near, at, or beyond their intended service life of 10 to 15 years. Recommend budgeting for replacements as necessary.

Bathrooms
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35) One or more open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and the presence of 2-pronged receptacles in some areas of this structure, an acceptable repair may be to simply replace the ungrounded 3-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:
  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.

36) One or more cabinets are not securely fastened to the wall. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of the cabinet(s) falling. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

37) Drawers are difficult to open and close in one or more cabinets. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

38) One or more light fixtures have missing bulbs and could not be fully evaluated. Bulbs may simply need to be installed, or repairs or replacement may be necessary.

Interior rooms
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39) No smoke alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. A qualified electrician should install smoke alarms as per standard building practices (functioning one exists in hallways leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom, etc.). For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

40) Lock mechanisms on one or more windows are missing and/or damaged so that they are inoperable. Repairs should be made by a qualified contractor or service technician so that windows lock and unlock easily.

41) One or more ceiling fans appear to be inoperable. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this, and if necessary, having a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.


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Front entrance
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Left side view. Vegetation has grown up on the side of house.
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There is a hole in some of the screens on the back patio.
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Back view of house.
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Backside of the carport. Lots of vegetation present.
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Separate carport in the back of driveway.
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Right side view of house.
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Carport.
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Crawlspace door and more vegetation present. Also present is a water softener pump
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Front view of carport
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Driveway
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Panel box
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Attic with debris present
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more debris
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Water heater, no drip leg or catch pan present.
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Crawlspace some falling insulation.
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more crawlspace pics.
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Garbage disposal not responding.
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Exhaust fan not responding over range.
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Open ground in both bathrooms. Hall and bedroom.
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Stopper missing out of both tubs.
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Gutter missing on right front side of house.

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