Environmental Home Solutions,Inc

Website: http://www.envirohomesolutions.com
Company email: inspections@envirohomesolutions.com
Inspector's email: Ivanforero@comcast.net
Phone: (754) 423-6870
FAX: (954) 726-5341
6606 Catalina Lane 
Tamarac, Fl 33321
Inspector: Ivan Forero

   

Commercial Inspection Report
Client(s): Iglesia de Dios Ministerial
Property address: 1100 S.W 21 Street, Fort Lauderdale, Fl 33315
Inspection date: Saturday, February 02, 2008
This report published on 2/6/2008 1:09:32 PM EST

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major defectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor defectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Structural Pest Inspection Concerns
Items of concern relating to the structural pest inspection are shown as follows:
WDO/WDI InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
WDO/WDI DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
WDO/WDI Conducive
conditions
Conditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp
 
General information
Report number: 1283
Structures inspected: CBS Church, and two CBS attached buildings
Type of building: Commercial Building (Church and Day care)
Age of building: 40 years (Built in 1968)
Report number: 1283
Structures inspected: CBS Church, and two CBS attached buildings
Type of building: Commercial Building (Church and Day care)
Age of building: 40 years (Built in 1968)
Property owner's name: Iglesia Evangelica Pentecostal Puerta de Salvacion
Time started: 11:30am
Time finished: 3:00pm
Inspection Fee: $2,000 + $900 mold testing
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Client(s), Property owner(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Partly cloudy
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: North
Main entrance faces: North
Foundation type: Slab on grade
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Security system, Playground equipment, Low voltage outdoor lighting, Water filtration systemRear building


1)   Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)
    2)   Some wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by furniture and/or stored items. Some areas couldn't be evaluated.
    3)   Gas was not available during the inspection (tank empty, shut off valve turned off, no tank installed, etc.). As a result, some appliances such as stove(s), range(s) and/or gas supply lines weren't fully evaluated. The inspector was unable to test for gas leaks.
     
    Exterior
    Footing material: No visible
    Foundation Material: Poured in place concrete
    Apparent wall structure: Concrete block
    Wall covering: Stucco , brick veneer
    Driveway and Parking material: Asphalt and poured concrete
    Sidewalks material: Poured in place concrete
    Exterior doors material: Solid core steel, Solid core wood, hollow core wood.
    4)   One or more guardrails are too low. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. A qualified contractor should evaluate and modify or replace guardrails where necessary.

    Photo 77  
     

    5)   One or more flights of stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 55  

    Photo 56  

    6)   One or more guardrails are constructed in such a way that children could climb them like a ladder. This is a potential safety hazard. Modifications should be made as necessary by a qualified contractor so guardrails cannot be climbed by children.
    7)   One or more exterior disconnect switches, such as for a heat pump or air conditioner compressor unit, have exposed wiring or components when the cover is opened or removed. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock, especially for children. Because these boxes rarely need to be opened (usually only for maintenance), recommend installing a lock on box cover(s) to reduce the risk of shock.

    Photo 25  
     

    8) The exterior finish over the entire structure is failing. A qualified painting contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain the entire structure as per standard building practices.
    9)   Water damaged to all exterior doors and door frames. Recommend repair or replace as necessary.

    Photo 11  

    Photo 12  

    Photo 26  

    Photo 48  

    10) Rot was found in one or more areas on exposed wood beamd. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.

    Photo 9  

    Photo 17  

    11) One or more gutters are poorly sloped so that significant amounts of water accumulate in them rather than draining through the downspouts. This can cause gutters to overflow, especially when organic debris such as leaves or needles have accumulated in them. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as correcting the slope in gutters or installing additional downspouts and extensions if necessary.
    12) Stains were found in one or more areas on soffit boards. These appear to be due to current roof leaks (dripping water, high moisture content, etc.). A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. Roof repairs may be necessary, such as to the roof surface and/or flashing. Drip edge flashing may need to be replaced or installed.

    Photo 29  
     

    13)   One or more areas of the grounds around the structure have significantly soggy soil, standing water or indications of accumulated water at times (sediment, dead grass, etc.). Recommend consulting with a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage, to determine if or what repairs are needed to provide adequate drainage. Possible repairs may involve grading soil, or installing, repairing and/or replacing underground drains.

    Photo 51  
     

    14)   Moderate cracks and/or deterioration found in one or more sections of brick veneer. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as repointing mortar, replacing bricks and/or sections of veneer. Moisture.

    Photo 7  

    Photo 91  

    15) The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.
    16) One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.

    Photo 27  

    Photo 38  

    Photo 52  
     

    17) One or more gutters are damaged. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should replace or repair gutters where necessary.
    18) One or more gutters were leaking during the inspection. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should replace or repair gutters where necessary.

    Photo 28  
     

    19)   Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.

    Photo 21  

    Photo 49  

    Photo 53  
     

    20)   Stucco is damaged and/or deteriorated on one or more areas. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 50  
     

    21)   Recommend Sealing around one or more exteriour doors. East side of property. West and East side of property

    Photo 15  

    Photo 16  

    Photo 36  
     

    22)   One or more moderate cracks (1/8 inch to 3/4 inch) were found in the foundation. Church West and East side, Day care front East side. These may be a structural concern, or an indication that settlement is ongoing. The client(s) should consider hiring qualified contractors and/or engineers as necessary for further evaluation. Such contractors may include:

  • Foundation repair contractors who may prescribe repairs, and will give cost estimates for prescribed repairs
  • Masonry contractors who repair and/or replace brick veneer
  • Geotechnical engineers who attempt to determine if settlement is ongoing, and what the cause of the settlement is
  • Structural engineers who determine if repairs are necessary, and prescribe those repairs

    At a minimum, recommend sealing cracks to prevent water infiltration. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.

    Photo 13  

    Photo 14  

    Photo 30  

    Photo 35  

    23) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. Church West side, Day care front West side. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.

    Photo 19  

    Photo 31  

    Photo 32  
     

    24) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

    Photo 20  
     

    25) Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.
    26) Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit The Ins and Outs of Caulking.
    27)   Recommend caulking and sealing around one or more windows

    Photo 23  
     

    28)   One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
    29)   Stains were found in one or more areas on soffit boards, but no elevated moisture levels were found and the wood appears to be in good condition. Based on the appearance of the roof, these stains may be from past leaks. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future. If moisture is observed, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 22  

    Photo 24  

    Photo 33  
     

    30)   One or more sections of foundation and/or exterior walls are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from vegetation, debris and/or stored items.
    31)   Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 3  
     

    32)   Parking lot in front and West side of building are not lined and are missing vehicle stoppers.

    Photo 1  

    Photo 2  

    33)   Minor cracks were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 18  

    Photo 72  

    Photo 73  
     

    34)     Playground, safely arranged on a mulch surface and protected by a 6' high chain link fence

    Photo 87  
     
     
    Roof
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Gable, Flat
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles, RolledGravel
    Estimated age of roof: Shingle roof: 10 years Rolled: 10+ years/ Gravel : 10 + years
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    35) The gravel roof surface material is beyond or at the end of its service life and needs replacing now. The client(s) should consult with a qualified roofing contractor to determine replacement options and costs.

    Photo 88  

    Photo 89  

    36) The rolled roof surface material appears to be near the end of its service life and will likely need replacing in the near future, even with repairs. The client(s) should budget for a replacement roof surface, and may want to have a qualified roofing contractor evaluate and attempt to issue a "5 year roof certificate".

    Photo 82  
     

    37) One or more sections of roof flashing are deteriorated and/or rusted. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and replace flashing where necessary.

    Photo 90  
     

    38) Signs of Standing water was found on the flat roof. It should evaporate within 48 hours after it rains. If standing water remains after 48 hours, then the roof installation is likely substandard. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair if necessary to prevent prolonged standing water.

    Photo 86  
     

    39) Gaps at one or more roof surface seams and at one or more roof penetrations were found. These may result in leaks. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 83  
     

    40) Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.

    Photo 84  

    Photo 85  

    41) Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.
    42)     Some repairs noticed to shingle roof on one or more areas. Recommend monitoring this areas specialy after heavy rains.

    Photo 80  

    Photo 81  
     
    Attic
    Inspection method: Partially traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Insulation material: None visible
    43)   No ceiling insulation is installed in the attic. A qualified contractor should install insulation for better energy efficiency and as per standard building practices with an R rating recommended for this area.
    44)   Pull-down stairs are installed for the attic access. No insulation is installed above the stairs and no weatherstripping is installed around the hatch perimeter. To reduce air leakage, recommend installing weatherstripping and an insulated hatch cover. An example of one can be seen at http://www.batticdoor.com/

    Interior air leaking into the attic results in heating and cooling losses, increased energy costs, and a possible increase in moisture levels in the attic due condensation forming on the underside of the roof sheathing during cold weather.

    45)   Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may be caused by a past leak. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about past leaks. The client(s) should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 44  
     

    46) Evidence of drywood termites was found on East attic area (pellets). Recommend having a qualified pest control company evaluate and treat as necessary.
     
    Electric service
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps):
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of sub panels: Church West office, Kitchen, Daycare storage room, Day care main room.
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    47)   Exposed wiring and/or bus bars exist in the main service panel or subpanels due to closure covers missing (slots where circuit breakers fit through the panel cover). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. Closure covers should be installed where missing to eliminate exposed wiring, and by a qualified electrician if necessary.

    Photo 74  
     

    48)   One or more service panel or subpanels covers couldn't be removed due to lack of access from shelving, cabinets, walls and/or ceilings. This panel wasn't fully evaluated. Repairs should be made so the panel cover can be easily removed.

    Photo 65  
     
     
    Water heater
    Estimated age: 12 years
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Electricity
    Capacity (in gallons): 50
    Manufacturer: RUUD
    Model: PE52-2TC
    49)   No drain line is installed for the temperature-pressure relief valve. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified plumber should install a drain line as per standard building practices. For example, extending to 6 inches from the floor, or routed so as to drain outside.

    Photo 64  
     

    50)   The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
     
    Heating and cooling #1
    Estimated age: 20 +
    Primary heating system energy source: Electric
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
    Filter location: At the base of the furnace
    Last service date: Unknown
    51)   The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    52)   The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.

    Photo 43  
     

    53)   Condensantion found on air handler unit. Pan rusting. Recommend having a qualified A/C contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 42  
     

    54)   The cooling fins on the air handler's evaporator coils are dirty. This may result in reduced efficiency and higher energy costs. Some sources claim that energy efficiency is degraded by about five percent each year as the coils get dirtier due to accumulated dust and grime. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should clean the evaporator coils as necessary.
    55)   Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.

    Photo 41  
     

    56)   Air handler filter(s) should be checked monthly in the future and replaced or washed as necessary.
     
    Heating and cooling #2 and #3
    Estimated age: Air handlers : 20+ Exterior condensing units: 8 to 10 years
    Primary heating system energy source: Electric
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
    Manufacturer: Carrier, York
    Model: H4CE180A2SA - 38 AK008-4501
    Filter location: At the base of the furnace
    Last service date: Unknown
    57)   Permanent structures are too close to the outdoor condensing unit. Standard building practices require that there be at least 12 inches of clearance on all sides and at least four to six feet above. Inadequate clearances around the condensing unit can result in reduced efficiency, increased energy costs and/or damage to equipment. Modifications should be made to structures around and/or above the condensing unit by a qualified contractor as necessary to maintain these clearances.
    58)   The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.
    59)   The cooling fins on the air handler's evaporator coils are dirty and bent, damaged and/or deteriorated. This may result in reduced efficiency and higher energy costs. Some sources claim that energy efficiency is degraded by about five percent each year as the coils get dirtier due to accumulated dust and grime. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, and clean the evaporator coils.

    Photo 47  
     

    60)   Panel missing cover. Replace panel.

    Photo 45  
     

    61)   Splices no contained in J boxes. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 46  
     

    62)   Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.
    63)   Air handler filter(s) should be checked monthly in the future and replaced or washed as necessary.
     
    Heating and cooling #4
    Estimated age: 13 years
    Primary heating system energy source: Electric
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
    Model: ARUF060-00A-1
    Filter location: At the base of the furnace
    Last service date: Unknown
    64)   The outside condensing unit is not anchored. Anchoring straps are missing. Recommend securing unit to ground.
    65)   The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.
    66)   The cooling fins on the air handler's evaporator coils are dirty. This may result in reduced efficiency and higher energy costs. Some sources claim that energy efficiency is degraded by about five percent each year as the coils get dirtier due to accumulated dust and grime. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should clean the evaporator coils as necessary.

    Photo 57  
     

    67)   Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.
    68)   Air handler filter(s) should be checked monthly in the future and replaced or washed as necessary.
     
    Heating and cooling / Wall units And bondaire unit

    69)   Wall units need routine maintenance. Recommend having a qualified A/C contractor evaluate and service units as necessary.
     
    Plumbing
    Water pressure (psi): Good
    Location of main water meter: Front West side
    Location of main fuel shut-off: Front East Building
    Visible fuel storage systems: Yes Gast tank N.E side
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Galvanized steel, Cast iron
    Drain pipe material: Plastic, Galvanized steel
    Waste pipe material: Cast iron, Not visible
    70)   One or more waste pipe cleanouts have no cap installed. This is a safety hazard because sewer gases may vent into the structure. A qualified plumber should install a caps where missing.

    Photo 34  

    Photo 37  

    71)   Copper water supply pipes in properties built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:

  • Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than six hours.
  • Install appropriate filters at points of use.
  • Use only cold water for cooking and drinking. Hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water.
  • Use bottled or distilled water.
  • Treat well water to make it less corrosive.
  • Have a qualified plumbing contractor replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components as necessary.

    For more information visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html
    http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html
    72)   Some of the water supply pipes in this structure are made of galvanized steel. Based on the age of this structure, these pipes may be nearing or may have exceeded their estimated useful life of 40 to 60 years. Internal corrosion and rust can reduce the inside diameter of these pipes over time, resulting in reduced flow and eventually, leaks. The inspector performed a "functional flow test" during the inspection where multiple fixtures were run simultaneously, and found the flow to be adequate. Despite this, and because of their apparent age, these pipes may need replacing at any time.
    73)   Recommend having the septic tanks inspected. Recommend having the tank pumped if it was last pumped more than 3 years ago.
    74)   One or more main waste pipe cleanouts show signs of wear from having been opened, possibly multiple times. Clogging and/or damage to the waste system may have occurred in the past. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) regarding past repairs, and/or have a qualified plumbing contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. A video scope device may be used to inspect these lines and to determine if they have been damaged. Repairs are often expensive due to the need for excavation.
    75) Stains were found in one or more sections of drain and/or waste pipes. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future, and if leaks are found, have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair as necessary. Alternatively, the client(s) may wish to have a qualified plumber evaluate now and repair if necessary.
     
    Kitchen

    76)   One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    77)   Gas was turned off, stoves were not fully evaluated.
    78)   One or more faucets leak or drip when turned off. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    79)   One or more faucets leak by handle(s) or at their base when turned on. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 62  
     

    80)   No range hood is installed over the range or cook top. Ventilation and/or lighting may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a vented and lighted range hood, with the exhaust fan configured so as to vent outdoors.

    Photo 63  
     

    81)   Vinyl flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should replace or repair the damaged flooring.

    Photo 68  
     

    82)   One or more kitchen appliances appear to be near, at, or beyond their intended service life of 10 to 15 years. Recommend budgeting for replacements as necessary.
    83)   Refrigerators were locked and were not fully evaluated.

    Photo 66  
     

    84)   What appears to be mold is present on one or more areas of ceiling. Mold testing recommended.
    85)     Water stains are visible on one or more ceiling areas. However no eleveated levels of moisture were found. Apparently from old roof leaks. Recommend monitoring these areas specialy after heavy rains.

    Photo 67  
     
     
    Bathrooms

    86) One or more toilets are loose. A qualified contractor should remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repairs if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking. Ladies room toilets

    Photo 70  
     

    87)   One or more sink stopper mechanisms are missing, or need adjustment or repair. Stopper mechanisms should be installed where missing and/or repairs should be made so sink stoppers open and close easily.
    88)   One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary. East building bathroom second floor.
    89)   One or more toilets have no water supply and could not be fully evaluated. The shut-off valve(s) may be turned off, or repairs may be necessary. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this, and have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair if necessary.

    Photo 78  
     

    90)     No water supply for sinks in Church bathrooms.
     
    Interior rooms

    91)   Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 10 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit this article: NFPA urges replacing home smoke alarms after 10 years.
    92)   One or more bedroom windows have inadequate egress in the event of a fire due to the opening size being too small and/or being unable to open. Bedroom windows should be easy to open, stay open by themselves, and have:

  • A minimum width of opening of 20 inches
  • A minimum height of opening of 24 inches
  • A minimum net clear opening of 5.7 square feet (5 square feet for ground floor).

    Recommend having a qualified contractor make modifications as necessary, such as moving or replacing window(s) to comply with these recommendations. For more information, visit http://www.taunton.com/finehomebuilding/pages/h00100.asp
    93)   Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 69  
     

    94)   Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
    95)   This structure was built prior to 1979 and may contain lead paint. Laws were enacted in 1978 in the US preventing the use of lead paint in residential structures. Lead is a known safety hazard, especially to children but also to adults. The paint found in and around this structure appeared to be intact and may be encapsulated by more recent layers of paint that are not lead-based. Regardless, recommend following precautions as described in the following links to Consumer Products Safety Commission website articles regarding possible lead paint.

    What You Should Know About Lead Based Paint in Your Home: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5054

    CPSC Warns About Hazards of "Do lt Yourself" Removal of Lead Based Paint: Safety Alert - CPSC Document #5055

    96)   Various windows are damaged and need replacement.

    Photo 54  
     

    97) Stains and elevated levels of moisture were found in one or more ceiling areas. The stain(s) appear to be due to roof leaks. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. East building S.E side. Evidence of water intrusion on floors.

    Photo 75  
     

    98)   Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.
    99)   One or more air supply registers are missing. The air flow cannot be controlled as a result. Registers should be installed where missing. Day care West room.
    100)   One or more windows that were built to open, will not open, or open only minimally due to their being shut, damaged,bolted and/or deteriorated in some way. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary so windows open fully, and open and close easily.

    Photo 10  
     

    101)   Lock mechanisms on one or more windows are missing and/or damaged so that they are inoperable. Repairs should be made by a qualified contractor or service technician so that windows lock and unlock easily.

    Photo 8  

    Photo 92  

    102)   Screen(s) in one or more windows or doors are torn or have holes in them. Screens should be replaced where necessary.

    Photo 79  
     

    103)   One or more locksets are loose and should be tightened, repaired and or replaced as necessary.
    104)   One or more locksets are damaged and/or deteriorated. Locksets should be replaced as necessary.
    105)   One or more exterior entrance doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

    Photo 61  

    Photo 76  

    106)   The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
    107)   One or more moderate cracks (1/8 inch to 3/4 inch) were found in the foundation. Church West and East side, Day care front East side. These may be a structural concern, or an indication that settlement is ongoing. The client(s) should consider hiring qualified contractors and/or engineers as necessary for further evaluation. Such contractors may include:

  • Foundation repair contractors who may prescribe repairs, and will give cost estimates for prescribed repairs
  • Masonry contractors who repair and/or replace brick veneer
  • Geotechnical engineers who attempt to determine if settlement is ongoing, and what the cause of the settlement is
  • Structural engineers who determine if repairs are necessary, and prescribe those repairs

    Photo 39  

    Photo 40  

    108)   Stains were found in one or more ceiling areas. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found. The stain(s) may be due to past roof and/or plumbing leaks. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this, and monitoring the stained area(s) in the future, especially after heavy or prolonged rain. If elevated moisture is found in the future, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. East building.

    Photo 58  

    Photo 59  

    Photo 60  

    Photo 71  

    109)   Minor cracks were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
    110)   Minor cracks were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
     
    Estimated repairs cost

    111)     IMPORTANT NOTICE: These costs are not exact and are intended only as a pleliminary guide to repair costs. Actual costs may vary greatly depending on many factors. Inspectors do not perform repairs and we do not normally provide price estimates in our reports. This list will serve you as a guideline and provide a "ball park" estimate for common items. It is always best to get a signed bid by a qualified contractor. ENVIRONMENTAL HOME SOLUTIONS, INC DOES NOT MAKE ANY WARRANTY OR GUARANTEE as to the accuracy, correctness, value, sufficiency or completness of the data or resulting project cost estimates.
    Environmental Home Solutions, Inc should have no liability for any loss, expense or damage arising out of or in connection with the information contained herein

    112)     Termite treatment $650.00
    Plumbing $1,800
    Electrical $950.00
    Caulking /Sealing $1,100
    Kitchen Hood $850.00
    Air condition service/repairs $ 2,250.00
    Windows repair / replacement $5,900.00
    Door repair / replace $ 6,500.00
    Septic tank $ 850.00
    Roofing $ 8,500.00
    Brick venner $ 1,300.00
    Guardrailing $ 2,300.00
    Gutters $ 450.00
    Wood repairs $350.00

    Total estimated repairs cost $ 33,750.00


     
    This report is a professional opinion based on a visual inspection of the accessible components of the property. This report is not an exhaustive technical evaluation. An evaluation of this nature would cost many times more.

    Please understand that there are limitations to this inspection. Many components of the home are not visible during the inspection and very little historical information is provided in advance of the inspection. While we can reduce your risk of purchasing a property, we cannot eliminate it, nor can we assume it. Even the most comprehensive inspection cannot be expected to reveal every condition you may consider significant to ownership. In addition to those improvements recommended in our report, we recommend that you budget for unexpected repairs. On average, we have found that setting aside roughly one percent of the value of the property on an annual basis is sufficient to cover unexpected repairs.

    The Standards of Practice prohibits us from making any repairs or referring any contractors. We are not associated with any other party to the transaction of this property, except as may be disclosed to you.

    The information provided in this report is solely for your use. Environmental Home Solutions, Inc will not release a copy of this report without your written consent.

    Thank you for selecting our company. We appreciate the opportunity to be of service. Should you have any questions about the general condition of the property in the future, we would be happy to answer these. There is no fee for this telephone consulting. Our fees are based on a single visit to the property. If additional visits are required for any reason, additional fees may be assessed.

    Sincerely,



    Ivan A. Forero, Inspector
    Environmental Home Solutions, Inc


    Inspected Once, Inspected Right