View as PDF

View summary

Aggressive home inspection LLC

Website: http://aggressivehomeinspection.com
Email: stephendolph@Hotmail.com
Inspector's email: stephendolph@hotmail.com
Phone: (860) 946-7015
Inspector's phone: (860) 946-7015
Inspector: Stephen Dolph
New York State License #16000049100
Connecticut state license #HOI.0000872
Jeffrey Molloy # 16000013750
NACHI Certified (www.nachi.org)

  

iNACHI Certified - New York State
Home Inspection Report

Client(s):  Joe and Laura Travaglini
Property address:  17 Sport Hill Pkwy
Easton CT 06612-2240
Inspection date:  Friday, October 06, 2017

This report published on Tuesday, October 10, 2017 9:37:53 AM EDT

This report is the exclusive property of Aggressive Home Inspection LLC and the Client(s) listed in the report title. Release or use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited. Unauthorized printing or reuse of any information contained within this report, in-part or in whole, without prior written permission of the Client or Aggressive Home Inspection LLC is a violation of New York State Law.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a potential risk of personal injury or death without regard to cost of repair
Concern typeMajor Cost ConcernCorrection most likely involves a significant near term expense exceeding $1,000
Concern typeRepair/Replace - MajorInvolves major repairs or replacement cost
Concern typeReplace or Repair - ModerateRecommend repair and/or maintenance with potential significant expense
Concern typeReplace or Repair - MinorCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance (Variable Cost)
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist - Significant
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeFYIFor your information
Concern typeDamageVisible and/or possible hidden Damage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Mold, Water/Wood Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.)
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms that, when not corrected will likely result in future problems (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Grounds
Exterior / Foundation
Roof / Attic
Garage / Carport
Electric
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Water Heater
Heating
Cooling / Heat Pump
Fireplaces / Stoves / Chimneys
Kitchen
Bathrooms / Laundry / Sinks
Interior Rooms / Areas
Radon Test Results
Structural Pest Findings

View summary


General Information
Return to table of contents

Report number: 108717
Time started: 10:00 AM
Time finished: 3:00 PM
Present during inspection: Client, Realtor
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Dry
Type of building: Single family
Age of building(s): 1937
Source for building age: Property listing
Front of building faces: Southeast
Main entrance faces: Southeast
Occupied: Yes
Additions and modifications: Addition and modifications made throughout the years.
Source for additions and modifications: Client, Inspectors opinion
Pictures, Captions, & Markings: It is IMPORTANT to understand that photos provided may not indicate ALL incidences of a noted defect. Photos are intended to give visual reference to examples of those found during the inspection. Captions, photos, illustrations, and markings are included to help you more easily understand the relative importance of reported issues. Color coding is provided to point out the relative severity of a problem. Red Arrows or Circles indicate the highest level of concern from a safety stand point. Red arrows or circles will indicate that a dangerous, or potential for a dangerous condition exists, without regard to cost of repair or installation. Many "Red" issues can be corrected at little or no cost. Some "Red" issues will indicated logical safety upgrades that, by todays standards may be required. This should not to be taken as a "requirement" to upgrade. Yellow arrows or circles indicate items that will likely degrade with time and could easily move to the "Red" category. Yellow indicators will also be used to advise of items or issues that may become more expensive to resolve as time passes. Blue arrows or circles indicate items of note that should be addressed when time permits and are some times just "common sense" issues. Green arrows or circles indicate items that, in the Inspectors opinion, are "a good thing". Green indicators do not suggest that items are in "like-new" condition. Green indicators are also used to indicate desirable items such as lightning protection, alarm systems, and specialty safety items. Green may also be used to highlight energy saving appliances or high efficiency equipment. Generally "Green" is a good thing, but may not indicate that an item is working at all. For example, Lawn sprinklers may be a good thing, but they are not included in a home inspection and their proper operation will not be indicated by a "Green" arrow or circle. Black and White indicators are included for informational purposes in general. Captions will be added when necessary to point out additional concerns and to provide helpful information. Illustrations are included to help you better understand complex issues and ideas. Not all illustrations will match your homes equipment, systems, or problems exactly, but are included to enhance or simplify explanations provided in your report sections.

1) Evidence of past or present rodents was found in the form of feces, urine stains and/or traps in one or more areas. For example, in the attic, crawl space, basement, garage and/or interior rooms. Recommend consulting with the property owner about this. A qualified person should make repairs to seal openings in the structure, set traps, and clean rodent waste as necessary. Recommend following guidelines in these Center for Disease Control articles:
http://www.cdc.gov/rodents/prevent_infestations/
Photo
Photo 1-1
Photo
Photo 1-2
Photo
Photo 1-3
Photo
Photo 1-4
Areas above the drop ceiling panels in the basement.
Photo
Photo 1-5
Photo
Photo 1-6

2) Structures built prior to 1980 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection.. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit:
http://www.epa.gov
http://www.cpsc.gov
http://www.cdc.gov
Photo
Photo 2-1
Asbestos?
Photo
Photo 2-2
Attic storage area.
Photo
Photo 2-3
Remnants of what may be asbestos were noted on some of the old heating pipes.
Photo
Photo 2-4
Photo
Photo 2-5
Photo
Photo 2-6
Photo
Photo 2-7
Lead paint?
Photo
Photo 2-8
Lead paint?

3) Based on substandard and/or nonstandard construction observed, additions to this property may have been made without the owner having attained permits or inspections from the municipality. Work may have been performed by someone other than a qualified contractor or person. The client should consult with the property owner about this, and if necessary research permits.


4) Many walls and floor surfaces were obscured by furniture, stored items and couldn't be fully evaluated.
Photo
Photo 4-1
Photo
Photo 4-2
Photo
Photo 4-3
Photo
Photo 4-4
Photo
Photo 4-5
Photo
Photo 4-6

Grounds
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: swimming pools, spas, hot tubs, water features and related equipment; playground, recreation or leisure equipment; landscape lighting; areas below exterior structures with less than three feet of vertical clearance; irrigation systems; invisible fencing; sea walls, docks and boathouses. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not test or determine the adequacy of drainage systems for grounds, walkways, below-grade stairs and roof downspouts. The inspector does not provide an evaluation of geological conditions and/or site stability, compliance of pool or spa fencing with municipal requirements, or determination that deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight.
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Sprinkler system
Site profile: Level, Minor slope
Condition of driveway: Appeared serviceable
Driveway material: Asphalt
Condition of sidewalks and/or patios: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Sidewalk material: Gravel, Flag/Blue stone, Belgium block
Condition of exterior stairs: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Exterior stair material: Masonry
Condition of fences and gates: Near, at or beyond service life
Fence and gate material: Wood

5) Fences were damaged or deteriorated in some areas. A qualified contractor should repair or replace sections as necessary.
Photo
Photo 5-1
Wood rot was noted.
Photo
Photo 5-2

6) Minor cracks, settlement, heaving and/or deterioration were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However, they don't appear to be a structural concern. Repair as needed.
Photo
Photo 6-1
Loose flagstones were noted.
Photo
Photo 6-2
Belgium block and natural stones walkways and steps can be hazardous because of inconsistencies. Use caution especially with high heels.

7) Conducive conditions Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines was in contact with or less than one foot from the building exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the building exterior.
Photo
Photo 7-1
Photo
Photo 7-2
Photo
Photo 7-3
Photo
Photo 7-4

8) Conducive conditions Trees were in contact with or were close to the building in one or more areas. Damage may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.
Photo
Photo 8-1
 

9) Drainage appears to have been installed. All drains should be kept free and clear of leaves and debris. The inspection is unable to determine the efficacy of the drainage system or its ability to control rain water or run off. The client my wish to consult with the home owner about this issue. Maintain, repair or correct as needed.
Photo
Photo 9-1
Monitor all leader drains during heavy rains and repair if needed.
Photo
Photo 9-2

10) The perimeter grading sloped toward the building in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the building foundation. Recommend where practical grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% for at least 6 feet. Swales or addition drainage may also be an option. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make necessary repairs or corrections. as needed.

Photo
Photo 10-1
Photo
Photo 10-2
Photo
Photo 10-3
 

11) Minor cracks, settlement, heaving and/or deterioration were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. Monitor and repair as needed.

12)   Reference Photos or additional items of note.
Photo
Photo 12-1
Fountains are excluded from the home inspection.
Photo
Photo 12-2
Sprinkler systems are excluded from the home inspection.
Photo
Photo 12-3
Leader drain? This leader drain is discharging onto the driveway this may cause icy conditions in the winter.
 

Exterior / Foundation
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: below-grade foundation walls and footings, or those obscured by vegetation or building components; exterior building surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determination the adequacy of sump pumps, seismic reinforcement, nor determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.
Condition of wall covering: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood
Condition of foundation and footings: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Foundation type: Unfinished basement, Crawlspace/basement
Foundation material: Concrete block
Footing material: Masonry
Condition of floor substructure: Appeared serviceable
Pier or support post material: Bearing wall
Beam material: Solid wood
Floor structure: Solid wood joists
Condition of concrete slab floor(s): Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of crawl space: Required repair and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Crawl space inspection method: Viewed from hatch, Very limited evaluation
Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
Vapor barrier present: Yes
Condition of the basement: Appeared serviceable

13) Damage Rot or water damage was found at one or more sections of siding, trim, window sills, soffits and/or fascia. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.
Photo
Photo 13-1
These look like door panels that are now fixed in place around the gazebo enclosure. Wood rot and deterioration were noted in several areas.
Photo
Photo 13-2
There may be hidden damages in these areas.
Photo
Photo 13-3
Photo
Photo 13-4
Photo
Photo 13-5
Photo
Photo 13-6
Photo
Photo 13-7
Photo
Photo 13-8

14) Conducive conditions The vapor retarder in the crawl space/basement was substandard in several areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified person should evaluate and replace or repair sections as necessary. Standard building practices require the following:
  • The soil below the vapor retarder should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor retarder should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

  • Better building practices require that:
  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.
Photo
Photo 14-1
Photo
Photo 14-2
Photo
Photo 14-3
 

15) Conducive conditions The exterior finish in many areas was failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per common building practices.
Photo
Photo 15-1
Lead paint?
Photo
Photo 15-2
Photo
Photo 15-3
Photo
Photo 15-4

16) Moderate cracks (1/8 inch to 3/8 inch) were found in the foundation. This may be a structural concern or an indication that settlement is ongoing. The client should consider hiring qualified contractors as necessary for further evaluation. Such contractors may include:
  • Foundation repair contractors who may prescribe repairs, and will give cost estimates for prescribed repairs



At a minimum, recommend sealing cracks to prevent water infiltration. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including hydraulic cement, resilient caulks and epoxy sealants.
Photo
Photo 16-1
Photo
Photo 16-2

17) Conducive conditions Soil was in contact with or less than six inches from siding and/or trim. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Ideally soil should be graded and/or removed as necessary so there are at least six inches of space between the siding and trim and the soil below.
Photo
Photo 17-1
Photo
Photo 17-2
Photo
Photo 17-3
Photo
Photo 17-4
There may be hidden damages in these areas.

18) Some Parging on one or more foundation walls was damaged or deteriorated. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 18-1
 

19) The crawl space access hatch was substandard and/or blocked by stored items, appliances etc. A qualified person should repair, replace or install as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.
Photo
Photo 19-1
Appliances were blocking some of the access panels.
Photo
Photo 19-2
Some of the access panels were too small.

20) Some sections of siding and/or trim were damaged. A qualified person should evaluate and repair, replace or install siding or trim as necessary.
Photo
Photo 20-1
Bird or insect damage was noted.
 

21) Conducive conditions Evidence of low grade moisture migration was found in one or more sections of the crawl space. For example, sediment stains on the vapor barrier or foundation, and/or efflorescence on the foundation. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the crawl space. The client should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner about past accumulation of water in the crawl space. The crawl space should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in crawl spaces include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

Ideally, water should not enter crawl spaces, but if water must be controlled after it enters the crawl space, then typical repairs include installing trenches, gravity drains and/or sump pump(s) in the crawl space.
Photo
Photo 21-1
Efflorescence was noted.
Most of the crawlspace/basement photos were taken with the extension pole.
Photo
Photo 21-2
Photo
Photo 21-3
This area was dry at the time of inspection.
Photo
Photo 21-4
Old plumbing leak? This area was dry at the time of inspection Monitor and repair if needed.

22) Many foundation and/or footings sections were obscured by being below grade and/or inaccessible areas and couldn't be fully evaluated.

23) 90% of the sections of the floor substructure were not fully evaluated due lack of access from ducts or pipes and/or Inaccessible areas.

24) Many concrete slab floor sections were obscured by stored items and or Inaccessible areas and couldn't be fully evaluated.

25) 90% of the crawl space/basement sections were not evaluated due to lack of access from the following conditions: hatch inaccessible.

26)   Reference Photos or additional items of note.
Photo
Photo 26-1
Photo
Photo 26-2
Joe this is an example of a kick out flashing. This will allow you to move the gutter away from the siding. Look at the adjacent photo.
Photo
Photo 26-3
Reference photo
 

Roof / Attic
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation; solar roofing components; any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determination if rafters, trusses, joists, beams, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing. The inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining roof surface life, does not determine that the roof has absolutely no leaks at the time of the inspection, and does not determine that the roof won't leak in the future. Only active leaks and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. To absolutely determine than no leaks exist, complete access to all roof structure areas must be available during a wide variety of weather conditions, including prolonged heavy rain, high wind from varying directions, heavy accumulations of snow and/or ice, and melting snow and ice.
Condition of roof structure: Appeared serviceable
Roof type: Gable, Shed, Modified
Estimated age of roof surface(s): Less than 10 years old on most of the roofing, some areas appear to be older.
Source for building age: Inspector's estimate
Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars
Condition of shingle and/or shake roof surface materials: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: One
Condition of exposed flashings: Appeared serviceable
Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Gutter and downspout material: Metal
Gutter and downspout installation: Partial
Condition of attic: Appeared serviceable
Attic inspection method: Viewed from hatch(es), Viewed through the louvered exhaust fan
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Ceiling insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt, Cellulose loose fill
Estimated ceiling insulation depth: 3 to 5 inches
Vapor retarder: Not determined
Roof ventilation: Not determined

27) The ceiling insulation's R rating was significantly less than what's recommended for this area. Recommend having a qualified contractor install additional insulation as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency. For more information, visit:
http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumer/tips/insulation.html
Photo
Photo 27-1
Photo
Photo 27-2
Photo
Photo 27-3
 

28) Conducive conditions The siding on one or more exterior walls above lower roof sections was in contact with or had less than a one inch gap between it and the roof surface below. A gap of at least one inch is recommended so water isn't wicked up into the siding from the shingles below, and also to provide room for additional layers of roofing materials when the current roof surface fails. If practical it is recommend having a qualified contractor make repairs as necessary, such as trimming siding, so at least a one inch gap exists between the siding and the roofing below where necessary.
Photo
Photo 28-1
Photo
Photo 28-2
Photo
Photo 28-3
About 1 inch for wood.
Photo
Photo 28-4

29) Conducive conditions Paper facing on batt insulation in the attic was exposed. The paper facing is flammable, and poses a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Also, the paper facing typically acts as a vapor barrier, and if located away from the interior surfaces, can trap moisture from condensation in the cavity between the paper facing and the interior spaces. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects. The inspector was unable to evaluate the structure obscured by the insulation. A qualified person should reinstall or replace the insulation as per standard building practices and as per the manufacturer's instructions.
Photo
Photo 29-1
 

30) Conducive conditions Extensions such as splash blocks or drain pipes for some downspouts were missing. Water may accumulate around the building foundation as a result. A qualified person should evaluate and repair, replace or install as necessary
Photo
Photo 30-1
Photo
Photo 30-2

31) Some downspouts were missing and/or loose. Water may accumulate around the building foundation as a result. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 31-1
Photo
Photo 31-2
No gutters.

32) Conducive conditions One or more roof surface sections were designed so as to be much more likely to accumulate debris and/or snow. For example, where two slopes converge and/or a steeper slope meets a shallow slope. Leaks may occur as a result. The client should monitor such areas for accumulated debris in the future and clean as necessary.
Photo
Photo 32-1
Some of these lower slope roof areas had roof/gutter heaters installed. These were plug in the roof heaters, the client may wish to upgrade to an automatic system.
Photo
Photo 32-2
Roof/gutter heaters.

33) Conducive conditions Roof repairs may be needed because some composition shingles had the following conditions: lifting. Monitor for leaks and repair if needed.
Photo
Photo 33-1
 

34) What appear to be minor condensation leaks were noted around one or more skylight areas. Monitor these area especially after heavy rain and repair in needed.
Photo
Photo 34-1
Photo
Photo 34-2

35) Some roof surfaces were obscured by being out of view and couldn't be fully evaluated.

36) Because of the height of roof, the inspector was unable to traverse the roof and wasn't able to fully evaluate the entire roof.

37) 95% of the attic and roof structure sections were not evaluated due to lack of access from the following conditions: Very limited access, photos taken through the louvered whole house exhaust fan.

38) Attic spaces greater than 30 inches in height appeared to exist in this building, but access didn't exist at the time of the inspection for reasons stated above. Recommend making adequate access as necessary (move stored items, install hatch, etc.) and evaluating these attic spaces.
Photo
Photo 38-1
Photo
Photo 38-2

39)   Reference Photos or additional items of note.
Photo
Photo 39-1
Modified roof rafter. Evaluate and repair if needed.
Photo
Photo 39-2
Example.
Recommend insulating the whole house fan area.
This obviously will not work unless you have additional access into this area. At a minimum, they make magnetic covers that you simply attached to the metal fan louver from the interior.

Garage / Carport
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The inspector does not determine the adequacy of firewall ratings. Requirements for ventilation in garages varies between municipalities.
Type: Attached
Condition of garage: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Garage vehicle door type: Swinging
Number of vehicle doors: 2
Condition of automatic opener(s): Appeared serviceable
Condition of garage floor: Appeared serviceable
Condition of garage interior: Required repair or evaluation (see comments below)

40) The walls between the attached garage and interior living spaces had gaps and/or holes. These surfaces are intended to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces, and to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so the attached garage wall and ceiling surfaces that adjoin living spaces are tightly sealed and fire rated as per standard building practices. Typically these surfaces require a one-hour fire rating.
Photo
Photo 40-1
The bedroom closet protrudes into the garage. The area below the closet is wide open and needs to be protected by a combustion resistant material.
Photo
Photo 40-2
Photo
Photo 40-3
There are many holes around the perimeter of some of the garage walls. They may have installed insulation in these walls. The client should ask the home owner about this. The issue is the holes are plugged with a material that does not appear to be a combustion resistant. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as needed.
Photo
Photo 40-4
The walls may be constructed of a press board or a similar material. This material may not be a combustion resistant material. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as needed.

41) One or more vehicle doors were damaged or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the door(s) as necessary.
Photo
Photo 41-1
The garage door Jamb is split. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as needed.
Photo
Photo 41-2
Some garage door damage was noted, repair as needed.

42) The oil tank located in the garage may be subject to damage from vehicles. A qualified contractor should install an adequate barrier as per standard building practices (steel post anchored in concrete, wood partition, etc.).
Photo
Photo 42-1
There is a post installed but the post is loose and it can be pushed up against the oil tank. I am concerned that something hit this it could still rupture the tank.
 

43) Reference Photos or additional items of note.
Photo
Photo 43-1
Past roof leak. This area was dry at the time of inspection a qualified person should evaluate and repair this area as needed.
There may be hidden damages wood rot was noted at the base of this same wall.
Photo
Photo 43-2
The sill plate is rotted. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as needed.

44) Some floor areas were obscured by stored items and couldn't be evaluated. These areas are excluded from the inspection.

Electric
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, does not determine if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific needs, nor determine if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, install or change light bulbs, nor determine the operability of every wall switch.
Electric service condition: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Primary service type: Overhead
Number of service conductors: 3
Service voltage (volts): 240
Service amperage (amps): 100
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
System ground: Cold water supply pipes
Condition of main service panel: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of sub: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Location of main service panel #A: Basement
Location of sub-panel #B: Basement
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed, (BX) Armor clad flexible, Copper
Condition of branch circuit wiring: Serviceable
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: None visible

45) Substandard wiring was found in the attic, basement and/or interior rooms. For example, unterminated wires, missing cover plates and/or extension or lamp cord used as permanent wiring. This is a safety hazard. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary and as per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 45-1
Missing cover plates.
Photo
Photo 45-2
Missing knockouts.
Photo
Photo 45-3
Photo
Photo 45-4
Photo
Photo 45-5
Live?
Photo
Photo 45-6
Missing knockouts.

46) One or more electric receptacles at the kitchen, bathroom(s), laundry room, garage, exterior and/or basement had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. Recommend having a qualified electrician evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.mikeholt.com/documents/nec/pdf/GFCI_requirement_page2.pdf

Photo
Photo 46-1
Photo
Photo 46-2
Photo
Photo 46-3
Photo
Photo 46-4
Photo
Photo 46-5
 

47) One or more wires in panel #A appeared to be undersized for their over current protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 47-1
Photo
Photo 47-2

48) The neutral buss bar at one or more locations appeared to be bonded to the panel, and should instead be "floating". This is a potential safety hazard for shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 48-1
 

49) One or more male plug ends were installed on non-metallic sheathed wiring. This type of wiring is only intended for permanent, immovable installations. Wiring may be damaged by repeated movement. This is a safety hazard for shock and/or fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as hard-wiring appliances or circuits, or installing flexible wire.
Photo
Photo 49-1
This is all wrong.
 

50) Some electric receptacles had reverse-polarity wiring, where the hot and neutral wires are reversed. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

http://www.reporthost.com.com/poweredby.gif
Photo
Photo 50-1
Photo
Photo 50-2

51) One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) type receptacles were found to have an open ground. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
Photo
Photo 51-1
 

52) One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric receptacles wouldn't trip and/or wouldn't trip with test instrument at the following "wet" locations: exterior, this is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 52-1
 

53) Some switches were worn. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary.
Photo
Photo 53-1
Photo
Photo 53-2

54) The service entrance wires had one or more loose points of attachment. For example, brackets and/or fasteners were loose. This is a potential safety hazard. A qualified contractor or electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
Photo
Photo 54-1
 

55) Lamp holders or light fixtures with fully or partially exposed bulbs were installed in one or more closets. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Flammable stored items may come into contact with hot bulbs, and hot fragments from broken bulbs may fall on combustible materials. Standard building practices require closet lighting to use fluorescent light fixtures, or to use fully enclosed incandescent fixtures. Installing a compact fluorescent lamp in a lamp holder is not an acceptable practice. A qualified electrician should replace closet lights as necessary and as per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 55-1
Photo
Photo 55-2
Photo
Photo 55-3
Photo
Photo 55-4

56) Smoke detectors were missing from bedrooms and/or on one or more levels. Additional smoke detectors should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, in each bedroom, and one each level of the building. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
Photo
Photo 56-1
 

57) All smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors should be fully evaluated after taking occupancy. Replace batteries,checking date codes and testing all smoke detectors and carbon monoxide detectors for proper operation.
Photo
Photo 57-1
Photo
Photo 57-2

58) One or more wall-mounted electric switches were within reach of shower stalls. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. At a minimum, the client should be aware of the shock hazard this represents and never operate such switches while showering. Ideally, a qualified electrician should evaluate and move switches as necessary, or a qualified contractor should make modifications as necessary so wall switches are unreachable from shower stalls.
Photo
Photo 58-1
 

59) The legend for over current protection devices (breakers or fuses) in panel #A and B was substandard. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
Photo
Photo 59-1
 

60) Neutral wires were doubled or bundled together on the neutral bus bar in panel #A. This is unsafe due to the need to turn off multiple circuit breakers to work on any of the circuits using these wires. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 60-1
 

61) Some wiring was loose, unsupported, or inadequately supported. Standard building practices require non-metallic sheathed wiring to be trimmed to length, attached to runners or to solid backing with fasteners at intervals of 4-1/2 ft. or less. Fasteners should be installed within 12 inches of all enclosures. A qualified, licensed electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, trim wire to length and/or install staples as needed.

62) One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in were loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 62-1
Photo
Photo 62-2

63) The electric service to this property appeared to be rated at substantially less than 200 amps, and may be inadequate for the client's needs. Evaluate and upgrade service if needed.

64) Electric panel(s) at location #C was not opened and fully evaluated due to the following conditions: Generator panels are not evaluated and are excluded from the home inspection.
Photo
Photo 64-1
The client should consult with the homeowner and or a qualified electrician on the proper use of the generator system.
 

65) Low voltage systems were found during the inspection. These are considered to be specialty system. No evaluation of these systems was performed during the inspection. For a full evaluation, the client(s) should hire a qualified electrician.
Photo
Photo 65-1
Photo
Photo 65-2
Photo
Photo 65-3
Old alarm system.
Photo
Photo 65-4
Old alarm panic button? As the homeowners, this is likely decommissioned.

66) Many electric receptacles were not evaluated because of furniture and/or stored items.

67) All smoke detectors were not tested due to the following conditions: may be integrated with a security system.

68)   Reference Photos or additional items of note.
Photo
Photo 68-1
Old but appeared serviceable.
Photo
Photo 68-2
Is this switch for the previous photo?
Photo
Photo 68-3
Electric heater
Photo
Photo 68-4
Photo
Photo 68-5
Some mystery switches were noted.
Photo
Photo 68-6
Generator plug.

Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: private wells and sewage disposal systems; main, side and lateral sewer lines; gray water systems; pressure boosting systems; incinerating or composting toilets; fire suppression sprinkler systems; water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems; plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks; back flow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determining the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks.
Condition of service and main line: Appeared serviceable
Location of main water meter: Not determined
Location of main water shut: Basement
Water service: Public
Water pressure (psi): Appears adequate
Service pipe material: Copper
Condition of supply lines: Near, at or beyond service life
Supply pipe material: Copper, Brass and possible galvanized.
Condition of waste lines: Near, at or beyond service life
Waste pipe material: Plastic, Galvanized steel, Cast iron
Condition of fuel system: Appeared serviceable
Visible fuel storage systems: 275 gallon? Oil tank.

69) Copper water supply pipes in buildings built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection.

For more information visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html
http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html

70) Conducive conditions Based on the apparent age of the water supply lines and/or observations made during the inspection, some of the water supply lines in this building were at or beyond their service life. A qualified plumber should evaluate and replace supply lines or make repairs as necessary.

Some of the brass water supply lines showed past leaks. After reviewing the photos more areas were discovered.
Photo
Photo 70-1
Photo
Photo 70-2
Photo
Photo 70-3
Photo
Photo 70-4
Photo
Photo 70-5
Photo
Photo 70-6

71) Conducive conditions Based on the apparent age of the waste lines and/or observations made during the inspection, some of the waste lines in this building may be near the end of their service life. Monitor and if necessary have a qualified plumber evaluate and replace waste lines as needed.
Photo
Photo 71-1
Photo
Photo 71-2
Photo
Photo 71-3
Galvanized steel drainpipes were noted under one or more of the sinks.
 

72) Evidence of one or more possible abandoned underground oil tanks was found (vent pipe, metal supply lines, etc.). The client should determine if underground oil tank(s) exist on this property, and if tank(s) have been removed or legally decommissioned.

If the tank(s) haven't been decommissioned or removed, then the client may be liable for decommission and/or cleanup of contaminated soil in the future. Recommend the following:
  • Have any non-decommissioned, abandoned underground oil tanks legally decommissioned or removed as necessary.
  • Have the soil tested for oil contamination.
  • Have contaminated soil removed as necessary.
Photo
Photo 72-1
Abandoned oil lines were noted.
White circle indicates oil shut off valve and filter.
 

73) Hanger straps for waste lines in one or more locations were missing. This can result in poorly sloped and/or fallen pipes. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 73-1
Install additional support brackets if needed.
Most of the crawlspace/basement photos were taken with the extension pole.
Photo
Photo 73-2

74) One or more plumbing vent pipes terminated less than six inches above the roof surface below. Debris or snow may block openings, and may result in sewer gases entering living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so vent pipes terminate at least six inches above roof surfaces.
Photo
Photo 74-1
Monitor and extend if needed.
 

75) Minor flow restriction was found at one or more sinks, bathtubs and/or showers when multiple fixtures were operated at the same time.
Photo
Photo 75-1
 

76) The inspector did not determine the location of the water meter. Recommend that the client attempt to find the water meter by consulting with the property owner, searching for it themselves, or consulting with the local water municipality. It is especially important to find the meter if no main shut-off valve is found because the meter may be the only way to turn off the water supply in the event of an emergency, such as when a supply pipe bursts.

77)   Reference Photos or additional items of note.
Photo
Photo 77-1
Oil shut off out.
Photo
Photo 77-2
Abandoned oil lines were noted.
White circle indicates oil shut off valve and filter.
Photo
Photo 77-3
Main water shut off valve.
Photo
Photo 77-4
Oil tank fill and vent.

Water Heater
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: solar water heating systems; circulation systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on water heaters, does not determine if water heaters are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit.
Condition of water heater: Appeared serviceable
Type: Tank, Indirect hot water heater
Estimated age:
Energy source: Boiler Loop
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Manufacturer: HTP superstor/stainless steel. Manufactures date could not be determined.
Location of water heater: Basement
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): Water temperature should be checked after taking occupancy and set between 110 and 120°

78) Temperature-pressure relief valve drain line was too short. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified plumber should extend the drain line to 6 inches from the floor, or route it so as to drain outside.
Photo
Photo 78-1
 

79) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. The inspector was unable to determine the age of the water heater due to the manufacturer's label being obscured, no serial number being visible, or the serial number not clearly indicating the age. The client should be aware that this water heater may be near, at, or beyond its useful life and may need replacing at any time. Recommend attempting to determine the water heater's age, and budgeting for a replacement if necessary.
Photo
Photo 79-1
Stainless steel models will typically last longer, monitor and replace when needed.
 

80)   Reference Photos or additional items of note.

Heating
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; solar, coal or wood fired heat systems; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating system components, does not determine if heating systems are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks.
Condition of heating system: Appeared serviceable
Location of heating system: Basement
Heating type: Circulating pump, Baseboard, Hot water, Hydro-Air
Fuel type: Oil
Source for last service date: Label on heater
Condition of burners: Appeared serviceable
Condition of venting system: Appeared serviceable
Condition of combustion air supply: Appeared serviceable
Condition of distribution system: Appeared serviceable
Distribution system: Ducts and registers, Pipes and convectors
Condition of controls: Appeared serviceable

81) The last service date of this system appeared to be more than one year ago. A qualified contractor should service this system and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.
Photo
Photo 81-1
Last service date 4/11/16
 

82)   Reference Photos or additional items of note.
Photo
Photo 82-1
Hydro air coil
Photo
Photo 82-2
Boiler pressure is a little bit high. At the time of the next service this should be evaluated and repaired if needed.
Photo
Photo 82-3
Multi zone heating system
Photo
Photo 82-4
Some jurisdictions require the ceiling areas above fuel-burning appliances to be covered with combustion resistant materials. Evaluate and install if required.
Photo
Photo 82-5
Manufactures date 4/29/10
Photo
Photo 82-6
Photo
Photo 82-7
Humidifiers are considered specialty items and are excluded from the home inspection. Recommend annual service. A qualified person should evaluate and repair or replace as/if needed.
 

Cooling / Heat Pump
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; cooling components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on cooling system components, does not determine if cooling systems are appropriately sized, and does not test coolant pressure. Condensation pans and drain lines may clog or leak at any time and should be monitored while in operation in the future.
Condition of cooling system and/or heat pump: Appeared serviceable
Location: Exterior and basement
Type: Packaged unit
Estimated age: Basement air handler 1986? Trane condenser 1987
Manufacturer: Lennox, Trane
Condition of distribution system: Appeared serviceable
Condition of controls: Appeared serviceable
Condition of air filters: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Location of air filters: At base of air handler

83) The estimated useful life for most cooling systems and heat pumps is 10 to 15 years. This system appears to be beyond this age and/or its useful lifespan and may need replacing or significant repairs at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
Photo
Photo 83-1
The condenser and air handler are 30 years old. These units may need replacement at any time.
Photo
Photo 83-2

84) The trap in the air handler's condensate drain line was missing. Standard building practices require a U-shaped trap to be installed to prevent cool air from escaping from the drain line. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 84-1
Photo
Photo 84-2

85) Air filters were missing at one or more locations. As a result, unfiltered air will flow through the system, and equipment life and the indoor air quality may be reduced. Correctly sized filter(s) should be installed. If necessary, guides or retaining devices should be installed or repaired so filter(s) are securely anchored and gaps around edges are minimized.
Photo
Photo 85-1
The air filter is laying at the bottom of the return duct. The system has been running with no air filter in place. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as needed. Duct cleaning may be necessary.
Photo
Photo 85-2
Recommend taping and sealing the cover as needed.

86) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines were too close to the AC condenser. Standard building practices require that there be at least 12 inches of clearance on all sides and at least four to six feet above. Inadequate clearances around and above can result in reduced efficiency, increased energy costs and/or damage to equipment. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain these clearances.
Photo
Photo 86-1
 

87)   Reference Photos or additional items of note.
Photo
Photo 87-1
Window and wall air conditioning units are excluded from the home inspection.
Photo
Photo 87-2
Air conditioning service date 4/3/15
Photo
Photo 87-3
Photo
Photo 87-4
Photo
Photo 87-5
This wall unit is wired into this thermostat.
Photo
Photo 87-6
Central air-conditioning is still producing cold air.

Fireplaces / Stoves / Chimneys
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: coal stoves, gas logs, chimney flues (except where visible). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of drafting or sizing in fireplace and stove flues, nor determine if prefabricated or zero clearance fireplaces are installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. The inspector does not perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit.
Condition of fireplaces, stoves: Appeared serviceable
Location #A: Living room
Fireplace type: Masonry
Fuel type: Wood
Condition of chimneys: Appeared serviceable
Chimney type: Masonry

88) The rain cap for the chimney flue at location #A was missing. They prevent the following:
  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to masonry from freeze-thaw cycles

A qualified person should install or replace rain caps, or make repairs where necessary.
Photo
Photo 88-1
Photo
Photo 88-2

89) Minor cracks, pitting and/or deterioration were found in the firebox at location #A. No repairs appear to be needed at this point, but recommend monitoring in the future.
Photo
Photo 89-1
 

90) The firebox at location #A were obscured by ashes and/or logs. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate.
Photo
Photo 90-1
 

91) All solid fuel burning appliances (wood stoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
Photo
Photo 91-1
Chimney looks good in general.
 

92)   Reference Photos or additional items of note.
Photo
Photo 92-1
Fireplace looks good in general.
 

Kitchen
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: free-standing or portable appliances such as dishwashers, trash compactors, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers; specialty appliances such as hot water dispensers, water filters and trash compactors; appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self and/or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances such as dishwashers, garbage disposals, trash compactors, ovens, broilers, etc.
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cabinets: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of dishwasher: Appeared serviceable
Condition of range, cook top: Appeared serviceable
Range, cook top type: Electric
Condition of refrigerator: Appeared serviceable

93) No exhaust hood or fan was installed over the cook top. Ventilation and/or lighting may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a vented and lighted range hood, with the exhaust fan configured so as to vent outdoors.
Photo
Photo 93-1
 

94) Hardware such as hinges, latches or pulls were loose and/or missing at one or more cabinets. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 94-1
 

95) The estimated useful life for most kitchen appliances is 10 to 15 years. One or more appliances appeared to be near, at or beyond their service life. Recommend budgeting for replacements in the near future.

96) Some cabinet surfaces, drawers and/or doors showed minor wear to moderate and/or damage.
Photo
Photo 96-1
 

97)   Reference Photos or additional items of note.
Photo
Photo 97-1
Kitchen appliances appear to be serviceable.
Photo
Photo 97-2

Bathrooms / Laundry / Sinks
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; bidets, heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.
Location #A: Full bathroom first floor
Location #B: Full bathroom second floor
Location #C: Full bathroom second floor
Location #D: Basement laundry and slop sink
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of toilets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of bathtubs and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of shower(s) and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of laundry facilities: Appeared serviceable
Gas supply for laundry equipment present: No
240 volt receptacle for laundry equipment present: Yes

98) Significant corrosion was found at the sink drain pipes at location #D. Corroded pipes may be near or beyond their service life. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair or replace as necessary.
Photo
Photo 98-1
Leaking faucet as well, repair as needed.
 

99) Conducive conditions The caulk between the tub/shower and the floors and or walls at one or more locations was deteriorated. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 99-1
 

100) Conducive conditions The bathroom with a shower at one or more locations didn't have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.
Photo
Photo 100-1
Photo
Photo 100-2

101) Cabinet surfaces, drawers and/or doors showed minor wear at location #A.

102)   Reference Photos or additional items of note.
Photo
Photo 102-1
The washing machine was not evaluated. The dryer appeared serviceable.
Photo
Photo 102-2
Photo
Photo 102-3
Photo
Photo 102-4
Photo
Photo 102-5
Because of the location of the dryer vent, the ductwork was not evaluated. Dryer ducts should be clean regularly. A qualified person should evaluate and clean if needed.
 

Interior Rooms / Areas
Return to table of contents

Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems; communications wiring; central vacuum systems; elevators and stair lifts; sources of obnoxious odors; cosmetic deficiencies due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment; deficiencies relating to interior decorating; low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Determining the cause of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.
Exterior door material: Wood, Glass
Condition of exterior entry doors: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of interior doors: Appeared serviceable
Type of windows: Wood, Single pane, Casement, Double hung, Fixed, Some are single pane windows with installed storm windows
Condition of windows: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Wall type or covering: Drywall or plaster
Condition of walls: Appeared serviceable
Ceiling type or covering: Drywall or plaster
Condition of ceilings: Appeared serviceable
Flooring type or covering: Carpet, Wood, Tile
Condition of flooring: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)

103) One or more guardrails were unsafe due to large gaps and or missing. This is a safety hazard. Common building practices require that they:
  • Be installed where walking surfaces are more than 30 inches above the surrounding grade
  • Be securely and permanently attached
  • Be at least 36 inches in height
  • Not be climbable by children
  • Not have gaps or voids that allow passage of a sphere equal to or greater than four inches in diameter

A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair, replace or install guardrails as necessary.


Photo
Photo 103-1
 

104) One or more exterior doors have deadbolts installed with no handle, and require a key to open them from both sides. This can be a safety hazard in the event of a fire when the key is not available. The door cannot be used as an exit then, causing entrapment. Key-only deadbolts should be replaced with deadbolts that have a handle on the inside on exterior doors in rooms with no other adequate egress nearby.
Photo
Photo 104-1
 

105) Handrails at one or more flights of stairs were not graspable. This is a safety hazard. Common building practices require that handrails be:
  • Installed at stairs with three or more risers
  • Sized and shaped so your hand can encircle them
  • Permanently and securely attached, and able to withstand a 200 pound force in any direction at any point
  • Continuous and extend for the entire flight of the stairs
  • Located between 30 and 38 inches above the leading edge of the stair treads

A qualified person should repair, replace or install as necessary.
Photo
Photo 105-1
Photo
Photo 105-2
Examples.
Photo
Photo 105-3
Photo
Photo 105-4

106) This structure was built prior to 1979 and may contain lead paint. Laws were enacted in 1978 in the US preventing the use of lead paint in residential structures. Lead is a known safety hazard, especially to children but also to adults. Numerous areas of the paint found in and around this structure are in poor condition (peeling, flaking, etc.). Recommend consulting with a qualified industrial hygienist to determine the safest and most cost-effective action to take regarding the paint. Testing and/or abatement may be necessary. Also recommend following precautions as described in the following links to Consumer Products Safety Commission website articles regarding possible lead paint:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5054.html
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5055.html
Photo
Photo 106-1
Lead paint?
Photo
Photo 106-2
Photo
Photo 106-3
Photo
Photo 106-4

107) One or more doors swung outward over stairs, and either no landing was installed, or the landing didn't extend at least 20 inches beyond the outermost swing area of the door. This a safety hazard, especially in the case of someone tripping or falling when standing on the stairs and opening the door while someone else walks through the door as it is opened. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
Photo
Photo 107-1
Riser heights very, missing handrail.
 

108) Stairs were unsafe due to the following non standard configuration: riser heights vary and/or low overhead clearance. Common building practices require that:
  • Riser heights not vary by more than 3/8 inch on one flight of stairs
  • Risers should not exceed eight inches in height
  • Treads should be at least nine inches deep, but preferably 11 inches deep
  • Minimum stairway width is 36 inches (although 30 inches is common in older homes)
  • Minimum overhead clearance at stairs is six feet eight inches

At a minimum, the client should be aware of this hazard, especially when guests who are not familiar with the stairs are present. Ideally a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary, and as per common building practices.
Photo
Photo 108-1
Photo
Photo 108-2

109) Some sections of flooring had moderate deterioration or damage. For example, cracked, chipped and/or loose tile and/or grout. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 109-1
A moderate floor crack was noted in this area.
Photo
Photo 109-2

110) Damage Rot or water damage was found at one or more exterior door sill. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.
Photo
Photo 110-1
 

111) Many windows that were built to open wouldn't open and/or were difficult to open and close. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 111-1
Many of the upper sashes were painted shut.
Photo
Photo 111-2
Photo
Photo 111-3
Most of the casement windows would not open, this may be due to them being painted shut. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as needed.
Photo
Photo 111-4
Photo
Photo 111-5
Photo
Photo 111-6

112) The sash spring mechanisms in some windows were damaged or loose. A qualified contractor or service technician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so the window operate as intended (open easily, stay open without support, close easily, etc.).
Photo
Photo 112-1
 

113) Glass in several windows was cracked or broken. A qualified contractor should replace glass where necessary.
Photo
Photo 113-1
Photo
Photo 113-2
Photo
Photo 113-3
Photo
Photo 113-4

114) One or more exterior doors were sticking. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 114-1
 

115) Some interior doors were sticking. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 115-1
Photo
Photo 115-2
Photo
Photo 115-3
Photo
Photo 115-4

116) Minor cracks and/or holes were found in walls and or ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
Photo
Photo 116-1
 

117) Conducive conditions The glazing putty and/or caulk at some windows was deteriorated. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.oldhouseweb.com/stories/Detailed/12216.shtml

118) The weatherstrip around one or more exterior doors was damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary.

119) Some exterior/interior door hardware, including lock sets were loose. A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary.
Photo
Photo 119-1
 

120) Deadbolts on one or more exterior doors were difficult to operate and/or loose. A qualified person should repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 120-1
 

121) Some interior door hardware, including lock sets, hinges and/or striker plates were loose and/or missing. A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary.
Photo
Photo 121-1
Missing deadbolt face plate.
Photo
Photo 121-2
Some of the doors on the built-in cabinets were sticky and or loose.
Photo
Photo 121-3
Photo
Photo 121-4

122) Crank handles at some windows were loose. A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary.
Photo
Photo 122-1
Photo
Photo 122-2

123) One or more exterior doors had minor and/or moderate damage and/or deterioration. A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary.
Photo
Photo 123-1
Decorative door? Repair as/if desired.
This door was not evaluated because of obstructions. The door is excluded from the home inspection.
Photo
Photo 123-2

124) Floors in one or more areas were not level. Significant repairs may be needed to make floors level, such as repairs to the foundation,support post,beams.
Most situations it is not practical to put the structure level and plumb, but stopping further movement is what is normally achieved.
Monitor and repair if needed.
Photo
Photo 124-1
 

125) Many windows used single-pane glass. Single-pane windows are one of the largest sources of heat loss in winter and heat gain in the summer due to their low insulating ability and high air leakage rates. They're estimated to be responsible for 25 to 50 percent of the energy used to heat and cool homes. The client should consider replacing single-pane windows with new, multi-pane windows.

126) Screens in some windows were damaged, missing and/or not installed.
Photo
Photo 126-1
 

127) Squeaking or creaking noises occur when walking on one or more sections of flooring. This is usually caused by substandard construction practices where the sub floor decking is not adequately fastened to the framing below. For example, not enough glue was used and/or nails were used rather than screws. In most cases, this is only an annoyance rather than a structural problem.
Photo
Photo 127-1
Photo
Photo 127-2
Photo
Photo 127-3
Photo
Photo 127-4

128)   Reference Photos or additional items of note.
Photo
Photo 128-1
One or more trip areas were noted.
 

Radon Test Results
Return to table of contents

Radon: Charcoal, Testing in progress

129)  
Photo
Photo 129-1
 

Structural Pest Findings
Return to table of contents

Limitations: This report only includes findings from accessible and visible areas on the day of the inspection. In addition to the inaccessible areas documented in this report, examples of other inaccessible areas include: sub areas less than 18 inches in height; attic areas less than five feet in height, areas blocked by ducts, pipes or insulation; areas where locks or permanently attached covers prevent access; areas where insulation would be damaged if traversed; areas obscured by vegetation. All inaccessible areas are subject to infestation or damage from wood destroying organisms. The inspector does not move furnishings, stored items, debris, floor or wall coverings, insulation, or other materials as part of the inspection, nor perform destructive testing. Wood destroying organisms may infest, reinfest or become active at anytime. No warranty is provided as part of this inspection.
Visible evidence of active wood destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of active wood decay fungi: No
Visible evidence of past wood destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of past wood decay fungi: No
Visible evidence of damage by wood destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of damage by wood decay fungi: No
Visible evidence of conditions conducive to wood destroying organisms: Yes, The vegetation is too close to the structure and the grading slopes towards the structure and one or more areas.

130) Reference Photos or additional items of note.
Photo
Photo 130-1
Small holes were noted in many of the floor joists, sill plates etc. this may have been part of an old treatment system.
Photo
Photo 130-2

131) Additional items of note.

This information came directly from the MLS listing.
Updates and maintenance by owner: annual termite treatment (paperwork to be provided and warranty to be transferred).

The client should consult with the property owner to determine the history of past infestations and treatment.


Copyright 2015 - Aggressive Home Inspection LLC

State of New York Certified Master Inspector [nachiver] International Association of Certified Indoor Air Consultants Infrared Certified Move In Certified