www.DoyleHomeInspections.net
Client(s):  Rich Mennella
Property address:  401 Sunshine Ct. Oswego, IL
Inspection date:  Wednesday, June 12, 2013

This report published on Wednesday, June 12, 2013 10:28:25 PM CDT

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
 
General information Return to table of contents
Structures inspected: House
Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Cloudy
Temperature: Hot
Foundation type: Unfinished basement, Finished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Shed, Playground equipment
1) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
2) Some wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by furniture and/or stored items. Some areas couldn't be evaluated.
 
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Brick veneer, Vinyl
Driveway material: Asphalt
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core steel, Sliding glass
3) One or more trip hazards were found in sidewalk and/or patio sections due to cracks, settlement and/or heaving. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary to eliminate trip hazards.

Photo 7  
sidewalk movement
 

4) Waterproof cover(s) over one or more electric receptacles are damaged or broken. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. Damaged covers should be replaced where necessary.

Photo 26  
 

5) One or more wall-mounted exterior light fixtures have wiring that's subject to water intrusion due to caulk not being installed around the light fixture's back plate. Caulk should be applied around the perimeter of back plates where missing. A gap should be left at the bottom for condensation to drain out.

Photo 5  
 

6) Moderate cracks and/or deterioration found in one or more sections of brick veneer. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as repointing mortar, replacing bricks and/or sections of veneer.

Photo 14  
cracked brick and mortar
 

7) One or more fence gates are difficult to open, close and/or latch, or are damaged and/or deteriorated. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary, so gates operate easily.

Photo 17  
gate and fence need repair
 

8) One or more downspout extensions are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary so downspouts are securely anchored and functional

Photo 9  
extend the downspots
 

9) Siding is incomplete or missing in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should install siding where missing to prevent water and vermin intrusion.

Photo 13  
loose siding
 

10) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.

    Photo 47  
    crack
     

    11) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

    Photo 21  

    Photo 22  

    12) One or more exhaust duct end caps Have no screening. Their purpose is to prevent and keep out birds, rodents and insects. Blocked ducts can cause fan motors and/or clothes dryers to overheat and may pose a fire hazard. Vent screening should be installed where necessary.

    Photo 18  
    no screen and dirty
     

    13) Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit The Ins and Outs of Caulking.
    14) The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 3  
    failing paint

    Photo 4  
    failing paint

    15) One or more sections of foundation and/or exterior walls are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from vegetation, debris and/or stored items.

    Photo 10  

    Photo 11  

    16) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 2  
    damaged asphalt
     

    17) Minor cracks were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 8  
    front stoop needs backfill

    Photo 23  
    patio has shifted and lifted out and up

    Photo 24  
    patio has shifted and lifted out and up

    Photo 25  
    cracks

    18) One or more downspouts terminate above roof surfaces rather than being routed to gutters below or to the ground level. This is very common, but it can reduce the life of roof surface materials below due to large amounts of water frequently flowing over the roof surface. Granules typically are washed off of composition shingles as a result, and leaks may occur. Recommend considering having a qualified contractor install extensions as necessary so downspouts don't terminate above roof surfaces.

    Photo 12  
     
     
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars, Viewed from windows
    Roof type: Cross gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 14
    Roof ventilation: Inadequate
    19) The roof surface material appears to be near the end of its service life and will likely need replacing in the near future, even with repairs. The client(s) should budget for a replacement roof surface, and may want to have a qualified roofing contractor evaluate and attempt to issue a "5 year roof certificate".
    20) One or more composition shingles are damaged, deteriorated and/or missing, and should be replaced. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 48  
    missing shingle tab
     

    21) One or more composition shingles have raised, most likely due to nails that have loosened. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as reseating nails.
    22) . When this roof is replaced, recommend a complete "tear off", where all existing layers of roofing are removed before installing new roofing materials. For 20-year rated composition shingles, additional layers of material reduce the new roof material's lifespan as follows:
  • 16-20 years - First roof
  • 12-16 years - Second layer on existing roof

    Removing existing roofing materials will significantly increase the cost of the next roof.
     
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    23) The garage vehicle door is damaged or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the door as necessary.

    Photo 6  
    dented garage vehicle door
     
     
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
    Roof structure type: Trusses
    Ceiling structure: Trusses
    Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill, Fiberglass roll or batt
    Insulation estimated R value: 38
    24) Ventilation is substandard in the attic. Inadequate attic ventilation may result in high attic and roof surface temperatures, reduce the life of the roof covering materials and increase cooling costs. High levels of moisture are also likely, and can be a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require one square foot of vent area for 150 to 200 square feet of attic space. Vents should be evenly distributed between soffits, ridges and at corners to promote air circulation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install vents as per standard building practices.

    Photo 27  
    mold is present on roof sheathing. More attic ventilation is recommended.
     

    25) The ceiling insulation's R rating is significantly less than what's recommended for this area. Recommend having a qualified contractor install additional insulation as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency.
    26) Ceiling insulation is uneven in some areas. This is likely due to someone having walked on or through the insulation. Recommend installing additional insulation where necessary to restore the original R rating.
    27) Ceiling insulation is missing in some areas. Recommend installing insulation where missing for better energy efficiency.

    Photo 28  
    The light above shower needs to be insulated. None is causing Hot Cold.
     
     
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Underground
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
    Branch circuit wiring type: Copper
    Smoke detectors present: No
     
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 4
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
     
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 4
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts, Flexible ducts
    Manufacturer: Trane
    Filter location: At the base of the furnace
    28) The furnace did not respond when its controls were operated. This system was not fully evaluated. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) as to how it operates and have a qualified heating and cooling contractor evaluate and make repairs if necessary.

    Photo 49  
     

    29) The filter(s) for the heating/cooling system should be checked monthly and replaced or washed as necessary.

    Photo 45  
    maintain
     
     
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Basement
    Location of main fuel shut-off: outside meter
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Plastic
    Drain pipe material: Plastic
    Waste pipe material: Plastic
    30) The clothes dryer exhaust duct appears to need cleaning. Significant amounts of lint build up was found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire from decreased air flow. This duct should be cleaned now and annually, or more often if necessary in the future. Some chimney sweeps or heating/cooling duct cleaners perform this service. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html or http://chimneykeepers.com/dryerclean.html

    Photo 43  
    clean please
     

    31) The washing machine is installed over a finished living space and has no catch pan or drain installed. These are not commonly installed, but they are recommended to prevent water damage to finished interior spaces below if or when the washing machine leaks, overflows or is drained. Recommend having a qualified contractor install both a catch pan and drain.
    32) Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
     
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Chimney type: Metal
     
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Pier or support post material: Steel
    Beam material: Steel
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    33) Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. For example, water stains and/or efflorescence on the foundation or floor, water stains at bases of support posts, etc. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.

    Photo 46  
    incomplete battery back up sump pump
     
     
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    34) One or more sink drains have substandard repairs, such as tape, sealant and/or non-standard components. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 51  
    sub standard plumbing repair
     

    35) The range hood fan vents into the kitchen rather than outdoors. Ventilation may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors. Recommend having a qualified contractor make modifications as necessary as per standard building practices so the range hood fan vents outdoors.

    Photo 50  
    vents indoor
     

    36) Water stains and/or minor water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below the sink. The client(s) should evaluate and consider having repairs made.
     
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    37) One or more light fixtures are loose or installed in a substandard way. A qualified contractor or electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so light fixtures are securely mounted and installed in accordance with the manufacturer's installation instructions.

    Photo 32  
    loose shower light cover
     

    38) One or more exhaust fans are noisy or vibrate excessively. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace the fan(s) or make repairs as necessary.
    39) One or more toilets are loose. A qualified contractor should remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repairs if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking.

    Photo 38  
    loose toilet 2nd floor
     

    40) One or more faucet handles are loose or missing and should be repaired or replaced as necessary.
    41) One or more TUB/sink stopper mechanisms are missing, or need adjustment or repair. Stopper mechanisms should be installed where missing and/or repairs should be made so tub/sink stoppers open and close easily.

    Photo 30  
    stopper is broken, drains slowly

    Photo 34  
    no sink stopper

    42) One or more shower drains are clogged or drain slowly. Drain(s) should be cleared as necessary, and by a qualified plumber if necessary.

    Photo 33  
    Yuk
     

    43) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated at one or more bathtubs. For example, where the tub base meets the floor below, where the tub surround meets the tub, and/or around the base of the tub spout. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to wall and floor structures.

    Photo 39  
    2nd flr

    Photo 40  
    2nd flr

    44) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated at one or more showers. For example, where the shower base meets the floor below and/or around the shower surround. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to wall and floor structures.

    Photo 29  
    shower door is broken and dirty
     
     
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    45) No smoke alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. A qualified electrician should install smoke alarms as per standard building practices (functioning one exists in hallways leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom, etc.). For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    Photo 42  
    replace all Smoke detectors
     

    46) Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 10 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit this article: NFPA urges replacing home smoke alarms after 10 years.
    47) Lamp holders or light fixtures with fully or partially exposed bulbs are installed in one or more closets. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Flammable stored items may come into contact with hot bulbs, and hot fragments from broken bulbs may fall on combustible materials. Standard building practices require closet lighting to use fluorescent light fixtures, or to use fully enclosed incandescent fixtures. Installing a compact fluorescent lamp in a lamp holder is not an acceptable practice. A qualified electrician should replace closet lights as necessary and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 41  
    no cover
     

    48) Seals between double-pane glass in one or more windows appear to have failed based on condensation or stains between the panes of glass. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace glass where necessary.

    The client(s) should be aware that evidence of broken seals may be more or less visible from one day to the next depending on the temperature, humidity, sunlight, etc. Windows or glass doors other than those that the inspector identified may also have failed seals and need glass replaced too.

    Photo 19  
    Glass has failed

    Photo 20  
    bedroom glass failed top sash

    Photo 37  
    the failed glass in bedroom

    Photo 44  
    fail glass. seal has shattered

    49) One or more air supply registers are damaged and should be replaced where necessary.
    50) One or more doors will not latch when closed. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. For example, aligning strike plates with latch bolts and/or replacing locksets.
    51) One or more sliding screen doors are damaged and/or deteriorated. Screen doors should be replaced where necessary.

    Photo 16  
    screen torn
     

    52) Stains were found in one or more ceiling areas. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found. The stain(s) may be due to past roof and/or plumbing leaks. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this, and monitoring the stained area(s) in the future, especially after heavy or prolonged rain. If elevated moisture is found in the future, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 36  
    apparent water damage on 2nd flr bedroom ceiling. was Dry.
     

    53) Minor cracks were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 15  
    drywall damage

    Photo 31  

    54) Condensation and/or mildew was found around windows. This is typically caused by high levels of moisture indoors coming in contact with cold, exterior surfaces, and can be controlled by heating and ventilation. Recommend the following:
  • Keep multiple windows slightly open in different parts of the house to allow ventilation.
  • Keep bathroom doors closed when showering.
  • Use exhaust fans when showering and cooking.
  • Use heavy curtains to cover and insulate windows.
  • Avoid hanging wet clothes indoors to dry.
  • Use dehumidifiers.
  • Replace single-pane windows (if installed) with multi-pane windows.

    Photo 35  
    keep sill of windows clean and weep holes clear
     
     

     
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