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(CSI) California Structure Inspectors

Website: http://www.csinspectors.com
Email: hlopez@csinspectors.com
Phone: (562) 569-0674
14031 Gridley Rd 
Norwalk CA 90650-3879
Inspector: Hugo Lopez
NACHI Certified #10051003

   

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): David Paikal
Property address: 781 Malcolm Ave
Los Angeles CA 90024-3207
Inspection date: 2/28/2011
This report published on Tuesday, March 01, 2011 12:21:13 PM PST

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This report is the exclusive property of CSI (California Structure Inspectors) and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Wood Destroying Organism Concerns
Concerns relating to wood destroying organisms are shown as follows:
InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
Conducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Attic
Electric service
Plumbing and laundry
Heating and cooling
Water heater
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Crawl space
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
Swimming Pool
Garage
 
General information Return to table of contents
Inspector's name: Lopez
Structures inspected: 2 storie residence
Type of building: Single family
Time started: 4:00
Inspection Fee: 299.00
Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Cool
Front of structure faces: South, East
Main entrance faces: South, East
Foundation type: Crawlspace
1) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)
     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Footing material: Poured in place concrete
    Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
    Apparent wall structure: Steel frame
    Wall covering: Wood clapboard, Brick veneer, Stucco
    Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
    Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete aggregate
    Exterior door material: Solid core wood
    2) One or more trip hazards were found in sidewalk and/or patio sections due to cracks, settlement and/or heaving. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary to eliminate trip hazards.

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    Stone step was loose.
     

    3) The driveway has significant cracks and/or deterioration in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace driveway sections as necessary.

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    4) Fascia boards are damaged or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

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    5) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

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    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Hipped
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 8-12
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    6) Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.

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    7) Trees are overhanging roof and are within 10 feet of roof vertically. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since organic debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate on the roof surface. Accumulated debris may cause water to enter gaps in the roof surface and leak into attic and/or interior spaces. Trees should be pruned so they are at least 10 feet above roof, or don't overhang the roof.

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    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
    Roof structure type: Trusses
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: None visible
    8) Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may be caused by a past leak. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about past leaks. The client(s) should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

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    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Underground
    Service amperage (amps): 125
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: Basement
    Location of main disconnect: No single main disconnect, use all breakers in main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Copper
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 60
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: No
    Primary service overload protection type: Fuses
    9) The main service panel uses older style, Edison base fuses. This type of fuse allows anyone to install incorrectly rated fuses, possibly resulting in damage to wiring. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate this panel and the wiring to determine if damage has occurred, and repair or replace components and/or wiring as necessary.

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    Circle shows Electrical Main, Arrows show path of water and moisture along the basement wall.

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    60 and 50 Amp fuses

    10) The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in the main service panel is missing, unreadable or incomplete. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
    11) The electrical panels are too close to an area of high water or moisture concentration. Recommend contacting a qualified electrician to evaluate the current position of electrical panels and components and if necessary, relocate to a more appropriate area.

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    Circle shows Electrical Main, Arrows show path of water and moisture along the basement wall.

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    60 and 50 Amp fuses
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): 90 psi
    Location of main water meter: Easment
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Cast iron
    Drain pipe material: Cast iron
    Waste pipe material: Cast iron
    12) The clothes dryer is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html

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    13) The water supply pressure is greater than 80 psi. Pressures above 80 psi may void warranties for some appliances such as water heaters or washing machines. Flexible supply lines to washing machines are more likely to burst with higher pressures. Typically the pressure cannot be regulated at the water meter. Recommend having a qualified plumber evaluate and make modifications to reduce the pressure below 80 psi. Installing a pressure reducing valve on the main service pipe is a common solution to this problem. If one exists, then it should be adjusted for lower pressures.

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    14) The clothes dryer exhaust duct is routed vertically. This can result in extended drying times, premature failure of the motor, drum rollers and heater. Recommend having a qualified contractor reconfigure the clothes dryer exhaust duct so it is routed horizontally, or as close to it as possible.

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    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: Unknown
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: N/A
    Primary Air conditioning type: N/A
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts, Flexible ducts
    Manufacturer: Andrews- schroeder
    Last service date: Unknown
    15) What appears to be asbestos is visible on some ductwork. However, it appears to be intact and not significantly deteriorated. The client may wish to have this material tested at a qualified lab. For information on asbestos hazards in the home, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/453.html

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    Loose and deteriorated Lining. Possibly asbestos.
     

    16) One or more air supply ducts are broken or disconnected. Increased moisture levels in unconditioned spaces and higher energy costs may result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary.

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    Air register in the master bedroom

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    17) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. The inspector was unable to determine the age of the furnace. The clients should be aware that this furnace may be near, at, or beyond its useful life and may need replacing at any time. Recommend attempting to determine the furnace's age (ask property owner or service technician), and budgeting for a replacement if necessary.

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    18)  

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    Ambient Air temperature

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    Heat Cycle Activated.

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    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 9 years, June 2001
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): 50
    Manufacturer: General Electric
    19) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

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    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Masonry
    Chimney type: Masonry
    21) A significant amount of creosote (1/8 inch or more) is visible in the fireplace flue. A qualified chimney service contractor should inspect, clean, and repair if necessary now and annually in the future.

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    22) One or more chimney flues do not have a screened cover installed. Screened covers prevent the following:

  • Fire hazard from wood fire sparks and embers exiting flues
  • Wildlife (birds, rodents, raccoons, etc.) entering flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install screened cover(s) where missing. Screens should have holes 1/4 inch or larger.

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    23) A wood burning fireplace has been converted to use gas logs, and no glass doors are installed on the fireplace. For gas conversions like this, the fireplace damper is modified so it is permanently open to prevent combustion gases from the pilot light and main burners accumulating in living spaces. Since the damper is always open, unconditioned air from outside can enter living spaces through the chimney, and conditioned air from inside can exit through the chimney. This can result in higher energy costs from heating and cooling. The client(s) should consider having a qualified chimney service contractor install glass doors on the fireplace to reduce or eliminate this air flow.

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    24)   Additional Photo of chimney flashing

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    Crawl space Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Partially traversed
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Concrete
    Beam material: Steel
    Vapor barrier present: No
    25) No insulation is installed under the floor in the crawl space. Recommend that a qualified contractor install R19 or better (6" thick fiberglass batt) insulation under the floor for better energy efficiency.
    26) Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the crawl space. For example, sediment stains on the vapor barrier or foundation, and/or efflorescence on the foundation. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the crawl space. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the crawl space. The crawl space should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in crawl spaces include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter crawl spaces, but if water must be controlled after it enters the crawl space, then typical repairs include installing trenches, gravity drains and/or sump pump(s) in the crawl space.

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    Circle shows Electrical Main, Arrows show path of water and moisture along the basement wall.

    27) No vapor barrier is installed. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should install a vapor barrier. Standard building practices require the following:

  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

    Better building practices require that:

  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Concrete
    Beam material: Steel
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    28) Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. For example, water stains and/or efflorescence on the foundation or floor, water stains at bases of support posts, etc. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.

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    Circle shows Electrical Main, Arrows show path of water and moisture along the basement wall.

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    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    29) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

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    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    30) One or more sink stopper mechanisms are missing, or need adjustment or repair. Stopper mechanisms should be installed where missing and/or repairs should be made so sink stoppers open and close easily.

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    31) The glass shower door may not be made of tempered glass. For child safety, the client should consider replacing the door with either tempered glass or Lexan composite.

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    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    32) Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    33) One or more air supply registers has a weak air flow, or no apparent flow, and may result in an inadequate air supply for heating/cooling. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this. Adjustable damper(s) in ducts may exist and be reducing the flow. If dampers exist, then they should be opened to attempt to improve the air flow. If the property owner(s) are unaware of such dampers, or if adjusting dampers does not improve the air flow, then a qualified heating/cooling contractor should evaluate and repair or make modifications as necessary.

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    Air register in the master bedroom

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    34) Floors in one or more areas are not level. Significant repairs may be needed to make floors level, such as repairs to the foundation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

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    35) Wood flooring in one or more areas is worn, or stained. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and refinish wood flooring as necessary.
    36) Glass in one or more windows is broken. A qualified contractor should replace glass where necessary.

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    Cracked window pane on second floor hallway.

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    37) Minor cracks were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

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    North East bedroom below the window

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    Hallway on second floor

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    Master Bathroom entryway.

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    Master Bathroom entryway.

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    Master Bathroom entryway.
     
     
    Swimming Pool Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: swimming pool bodies; equipment on timers, remote controls or sensors; underground or concealed piping; motorized covers; waterfalls and related equipment; Ozone generators; ultraviolate light systems; filter backflushing mechanisms. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not disassemble filters, remove pool covers, nor determine if swimming pool bodies, filters or skimmers leak, nor determine if swimming pool bodies are level.
    Water level: Full
    Condition of fences and gates: Appeared serviceable
    Fence and gate material: Wrought iron
    Condition of body: Appeared serviceable
    Body type: Below ground ~
    Body material: Plaster-Gunite ~
    Condition of deck: Appeared serviceable
    Deck material: Concrete
    Condition of coping: Appeared serviceable
    Coping material: Concrete
    Condition of pumps, lines and valves: Appeared serviceable
    Water is refilled through: Valve
    Types of pumps installed: Circulation
    Line material: PVC
    Condition of heater and related equipment: Appeared serviceable
    Heater energy source: Natural gas
    Condition of filter and related equipment: Appeared serviceable
    Filter type: Diatomaceous earth
    Filter air relief valve installed: Yes
    Filter pressure gauge installed: Yes
    Pressure when filter is clean (psi): ASK!
    Filter pressure at time of inspection (psi): 10 psi
    Condition of electrical equipment: Appeared serviceable
    Location of electrical disconnect: In sub-panel at equipment
    Type of wiring: Nonmetallic sheathed (Romex)
    38) No removable cover was installed for the pool. Recommend that one be installed to maintain water quality and for safety purposes.
    39) This municipality has no established barrier requirements for privately owned pools and spas. Regardless, the client should be aware of the associated drowning hazards. For pool and spa barrier safety guidelines, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/Pool.pdf

    40) The plaster surface of the pool body had rust spots, significant wear marks in some areas. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary. Concrete pools or spas should be replastered every 10 to 15 years. For more information, visit:
    http://www.poolcenter.com/plaster.htm
    http://www.poolcenter.com/poolcare_surface_repair.htm

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    41) The reading at the Diatomaceous earth filter's pressure gauge was relatively high. Diatomaceous earth filters should be backwashed and have the medium replaced when the pressure gauge reads 7-10 lbs above the clean, starting pressure (after backwashing and replacing medium). If backwashing is ineffective then the septa may need replacing, or other repairs may be needed. A qualified person should evaluate and maintain or repair as necessary.

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    10 Psi

    42)   Additional Photographs.

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    Garage Return to table of contents

    43) No infrared "photo eye" devices are installed for the vehicle door's electric door opener. They've been required on all vehicle door openers since 1993 and improve safety by triggering the vehicle door's auto-reverse feature without need for the door to come in contact with the object, person or animal that's preventing it from closing. Recommend considering having a qualified contractor install these devices for improved safety. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html
    http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html

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    44) Much of the garage, including areas around the interior perimeter and in the center are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.

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    Garage

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    Garage Window

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    We thank you for your business and for choosing CSI! If you have any questions about this report, please feel free to contact us at any time! We are happy to be of service!