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Crossfire Home Inspection


Inspector's email: wayne3@frontier.com
Inspector's phone: (765) 206-0707
8768 N 800 W 
Colfax IN 46035-9649
Inspector: Gary Minor

 

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  Joe Home Buyer
Property address: 
Anywhere USA
Inspection date:  Wednesday, June 14, 2017

This report published on Monday, June 19, 2017 7:16:10 PM EDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
CommentFor your information

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Crawl space
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms

View summary


General information
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Type of building: Single family
Payment method: Invoiced
Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Hot
Ground condition: Damp
Front of structure faces: South
Main entrance faces: South
Foundation type: Unfinished basement, Crawlspace

1) Comment - This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html

2) Comment - Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:

Exterior
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Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Concrete block, Brick
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Vinyl
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete

3) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more sets of stairs are wobbly. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary, such as installing additional supports and/or diagonal bracing.

4) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more outdoor electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all outdoor receptacles within six feet six inches of ground level have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

5) Safety, Repair/Replace, Comment - Stairs are unsafe due to a non-standard configuration, such as too-high riser heights and/or too-narrow tread depths. Standard building practices call for riser heights not to exceed eight inches and tread depths to be at least nine inches but preferably 11 inches. Riser heights should not vary more than 3/8 inch on a flight of stairs. At a minimum, the client(s) should be aware of this hazard, especially when guests who are not familiar with the stairs are present. Ideally a qualified contractor should repair or replace stairs so they conform to standard building practices.
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6) Safety, Repair/Replace - Handrail(s) at some stairs are loose. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary. For example, installing new fasteners and/or hardware so handrails are securely attached.

7) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Gutters in one or more areas are significantly rusted or corroded. Leaks may result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace gutters where necessary. Garage Gutters
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8) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.
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9) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Soffit boards are damaged or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. Garage
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10) Repair/Replace - One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.
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11) Repair/Maintain, Evaluate - One or more moderate cracks (1/8 inch to 3/4 inch) were found in the foundation. These may be a structural concern, or an indication that settlement is ongoing. The client(s) should consider hiring qualified contractors and/or engineers as necessary for further evaluation. Such contractors may include:
  • Foundation repair contractors who may prescribe repairs, and will give cost estimates for prescribed repairs
  • Masonry contractors who repair and/or replace brick veneer
  • Geotechnical engineers who attempt to determine if settlement is ongoing, and what the cause of the settlement is
  • Structural engineers who determine if repairs are necessary, and prescribe those repairs

  • At a minimum, recommend sealing cracks to prevent water infiltration. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply).
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair).
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12) Repair/Maintain - Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
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13) Maintain - The finish on the deck(s) and railing(s) is worn and/or deteriorated. Recommend cleaning and refinishing as necessary.

14) Maintain - The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.
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15) Evaluate - The front porch floor has settled & has a gap into the basement. May want to consider having the porch floor leveled.
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16) Comment - One or more sections of foundation and/or exterior walls are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from vegetation, debris and/or stored items.

17) Comment - Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
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Roof
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Roof inspection method: Viewed from eaves on ladder, Viewed from windows
Roof type: Gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Roof ventilation: Adequate

18) Major Defect, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The roof surface material is beyond or at the end of its service life and needs replacing now. The client(s) should consult with a qualified roofing contractor to determine replacement options and costs. Including Garage
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Garage
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19) Repair/Replace - The garage vehicle door is damaged or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the door as necessary.
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20) Repair/Replace - One or more exterior entrance doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.
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21) Repair/Replace - One or more windows are broken or missing.
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22) Evaluate - Electrical box uses older type screw in fuses. may want to replace with breaker box.
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Attic
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Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill, Fiberglass roll or batt

Electric service
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Primary service type: Overhead
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 100
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: Basement
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Service entrance conductor material: Copper
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil, Copper
Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed, Copper
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
Smoke detectors present: No

23) Safety, Repair/Replace - The main service panel cover is missing or not installed. Exposed, energized wiring and equipment exists as a result and is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. The panel cover should be reinstalled or replaced, and by a qualified electrician if necessary.
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Water heater
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Estimated age: 8
Type: Tank
Energy source: Electricity
Capacity (in gallons): 52

24) Repair/Replace - Service doors are missing.
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25) Comment - The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

Heating and cooling
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Estimated age: 8
Primary heating system energy source: Propane gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air, Up draft, High efficiency
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts, Metal pipe
Filter location: At the base of the furnace

26) Repair/Replace, Evaluate, Comment - Because of furnishings and/or stored items, the inspector was unable to determine if a source of heat is installed in each room where one should be installed. No ductwork to upstairs rooms.

Plumbing and laundry
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Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Polyethelene
Supply pipe material: Copper
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Plastic

27) Repair/Replace - The sump pump discharges to close to the foundation, This needs to be extended to get water away from house.
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Crawl space
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Inspection method: Traversed
Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
Pier or support post material: Wood
Beam material: Solid wood
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
Vapor barrier present: No

28) Repair/Maintain - Soil is in contact with one or more wooden support post bases. Soil should be graded or removed to maintain a six inch gap between the support post bases and the soil below.
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Basement
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Pier or support post material: Wood
Beam material: Solid wood
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists

29) Repair/Replace - One support post is lose.

Kitchen
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30) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
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31) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more stove top burners are inoperable. A qualified appliance technician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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32) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more cabinets and/or drawers are damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace cabinets and/or components as necessary.

33) Repair/Replace - The refrigerator and/or freezer door handle(s) are loose and/or missing. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified appliance technician if necessary, such as tightening or replacing handles.

34) Evaluate - One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
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35) Comment - One or more kitchen appliances appear to be near, at, or beyond their intended service life of 10 to 15 years. Recommend budgeting for replacements as necessary.

Bathrooms
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36) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric receptacles did not trip when tested. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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37) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more toilets "run" after being flushed, where water leaks from the tank into the bowl. Significant amounts of water can be lost through such leaks. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair or replace components as necessary.

38) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The shower diverter valve for one or more bathtub faucets is defective. A significant amount of water comes out of the bathtub spout when the shower is turned on. Water will be wasted as a result. A qualified plumber should evaluate and replace components or make repairs as necessary.

39) Repair/Replace - One or more sink stopper mechanisms are missing, or need adjustment or repair. Stopper mechanisms should be installed where missing and/or repairs should be made so sink stoppers open and close easily.

Interior rooms
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40) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices. Replacement of three-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles is not an acceptable solution.

41) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles have reverse-polarity wiring, where the hot and neutral wires are reversed. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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42) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
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43) Safety, Repair/Replace - No smoke alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. A qualified electrician should install smoke alarms as per standard building practices (functioning one exists in hallways leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom, etc.). For more information, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

44) Safety, Minor Defect - Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
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45) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more ceiling fans wobbles excessively during operation. This is a potential safety hazard and may be caused by one or more of the following:
  • Loose screws
  • Loose blade(s)
  • A loose connection between the rod and the fan body
  • A loose connection between the fan body and the electric box above
  • Misaligned blades
  • Bent or warped blades
  • Unbalanced blades

Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=unbalanced+ceiling+fans
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Photo 45-1
 

46) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.
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Photo 46-1
 

47) Repair/Replace - One or more windows that were built to open, will not open, or open only minimally due to their being painted shut, damaged and/or deteriorated in some way. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary so windows open fully, and open and close easily.
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Photo 47-1
 

48) Repair/Replace - Glass in one or more windows is broken. A qualified contractor should replace glass where necessary.
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49) Repair/Replace - Screen(s) in one or more windows are torn or have holes in them. Screens should be replaced where necessary.

50) Repair/Replace - One or more interior doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.
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Photo 50-1
 

51) Repair/Replace - One or more exterior entrance doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor. Door closers & locks missing on storm doors.

52) Repair/Replace - Trim is missing in one or more areas. Recommend having a qualified contractor install trim where missing.

53) Repair/Replace - Window seals are rotted on one or more windows. one down & one up on north side.
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Photo 53-1
 

54) Evaluate - One or more rooms that are considered living spaces appear to have no visible source of heat. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) regarding this, and if necessary, a qualified contractor should evaluate and install heat source(s) as necessary. Upstairs

55) Evaluate - One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
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56) Evaluate - There is a week spot in the upstairs floor.
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