Closer Look Home Inspectionsllc

Website: http://www.reporthost.com/closerlookhi
Email: travelerrd@aol.com
Company phone: (203) 671-3601
Inspector's phone: (203) 453-4718
FAX: (203) 453-7706
42 Forest Brook Rd. Guilford Ct. 06437
Inspector: Robert DeCesare
HO1 513

 

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Sample Report 1
Property address:
Clinton, Connecticut 06413
Inspection date: 6/10/2011
This report published on Tuesday, August 16, 2011 1:28:22 PM EDT

View summary page

Thank you for using Closer Look Home Inspections LLC for your inspection needs.

The following written report is prepared for the sole, confidential and exclusive use of the client(s) named above. It is designed to highlight significant visual defects uncovered on the day of the inspection. It is intended as a general guide to help you evaluate the home. Read your entire Home Inspection Report , paying close attention to all items noted on the report and to any exclusions and limitations listed. Any items noted that require further evaluation by a professional should be investigated. I recommend that all repairs be made by a licensed, qualified contractor.

Best Wishes,

Bob DeCesare
Closer Look Home Inspections LLC

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 47 years
Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: West
Main entrance faces: West
Foundation type: Finished basement
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 47 years
Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: West
Main entrance faces: West
Foundation type: Finished basement
1) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Vinyl
Driveway material: Asphalt
Sidewalk material: Brick
Exterior door material: Solid core steel
2) One or more trip hazards were found in sidewalk and/or patio sections due to cracks, settlement and/or heaving. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary to eliminate trip hazards.

Photo 3  
 

3) One or more large trees on the property may be likely to fall on the structure, and are a potential safety hazard. Recommend consulting with a qualified arborist to determine if tree(s) need to be removed and/or pruned.

Photo 41  
 

4) Guardrails are missing from one or more sections of decks or elevated surfaces with high drop-offs. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. Standard building practices require guardrails to be installed at drop-offs higher than 30 inches, but in some cases it is advised to install them at shorter drop-offs. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install guardrails as necessary and as per standard building practices.
5) One or more outdoor electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all outdoor receptacles within six feet six inches of ground level have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

Photo 6  
Chalking is needed around outside recepticle
 

6) One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.

Photo 9  

Photo 13  

7) The driveway has significant cracks and/or deterioration in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace driveway sections as necessary.

Photo 20  
 

8) One or more wooden deck support posts are in contact with soil. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. However no damage from wood destroying insects or organisms was found. Standard building practices require that there be at least 6" of space between any wood and the soil below, even if the wood is treated. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. Otherwise recommend installing borate based Impel rods to prevent rot.

Photo 15  
Support post appears to be temporary. Assess and repair.
 

9) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.

    Photo 5  

    Photo 7  

    10) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
    11) Window glazing putty at one or more windows is missing and/or deteriorated. Putty should be replaced and/or installed where necessary. For more information on replacing window putty, visit: http://www.oldhouseweb.com/stories/Detailed/12216.shtml

    Photo 19  
    Rot was found on sill on garage window. Repair as necessary.
     

    12) Recommend cleaning deck(s) and railing(s) and treating with a preservative claiming to waterproof, block ultraviolet light, and stop mildew. Consumer Reports recommends these products:

  • Cabot Decking Stain and PTW Stain
  • Olympic Water Repellent Deck Stain
  • Thompson's House and Deck Stain
  • Wolman PTW Deck Stain
  • Akzo Sikkens Cetol DEK
  • Benjamin Moore Moorwood Clear Wood Finish
  • DAP Woodlife Premium
  • Olympic Natural Look Protector Plus

    Photo 16  
     

    13) One or more sections of foundation and/or exterior walls are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from vegetation, debris and/or stored items.

    Photo 8  
     
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 18 years
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Inadequate
    14) Gap exists between original siding and vinyl siding. Water from the gutter is leaking inbetween causing water damage inside garage wall. This is a major concern and can not be fully assessed until sheet rock is removed.

    Photo 28  

    Photo 35  

    Photo 25  
     

    15) One or more "rubber boot" flashings are damaged or deteriorated and may result in leaks or vermin intrusion. A qualified contractor should replace flashings where necessary.

    Photo 24  

    Photo 27  

    16) Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.
    17) Moss is growing on the roof. As a result, shingles may lift or be damaged. Leaks may result and/or the roof surface may fail prematurely. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Efforts should be taken to kill the moss during its growing season (wet months). Typically zinc-based chemicals are used for this, and must be applied periodically. For information on various moss treatment products and their pros and cons, visit http://bryophytes.science.oregonstate.edu/page24.htm

    Photo 17  
    Flashing is not visable along garage roof line. Consult roofing contractor.
     
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    18) One or more garage electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all garage receptacles, except for one for use with a refrigerator or freezer, have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    19) Evidence of "light to moderate" rodent infestation was found in one or more areas. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines this as less than 20 feces per square foot. Rodent infestation may be a safety hazard due to the risk of contracting Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). HPS is a rare (only 20-50 cases per year in the United states) but deadly (40% mortality rate) disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. For example, from sweeping up rodent droppings.

    Recommend following guidelines in the CDC's Clean Up, Trap Up, Seal Up article for eradicating rodents, cleaning up their waste and nesting materials, and preventing future infestations. While Hantavirus is believed to survive less than one week in droppings and urine, specific precautions should be taken during clean up. The client(s) may wish to consult with a qualified, licensed pest control operator for eliminating the infestation. A qualified licensed abatement contractor or industrial hygienist could be contacted for clean up. If the infestation was minimal, clean up of rodent waste and nesting materials in non-living spaces (crawl spaces and attics) may not be necessary, or may be performed for aesthetic reasons only (odor and appearance).

    20) Much of the garage, including areas around the interior perimeter and in the center are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.

    Photo 37  
     
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Partially traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Insulation depth: 6 to 8"
    21) Ventilation is substandard in the attic. Inadequate attic ventilation may result in high attic and roof surface temperatures, reduce the life of the roof covering materials and increase cooling costs. High levels of moisture are also likely, and can be a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require one square foot of vent area for 150 to 200 square feet of attic space. Vents should be evenly distributed between soffits, ridges and at corners to promote air circulation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install vents as per standard building practices.
    22) One or more attic vents are blocked by insulation and/or debris. This can reduce air flow through the attic, reduce the life of the roof surface because of high temperatures, and/or increase moisture levels in the attic. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as moving insulation or debris, so vents are unobstructed.
    23) No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.
    24) Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may be caused by a past leak. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about past leaks. The client(s) should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 39  

    Photo 40  
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 100
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: Garage
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Copper
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil, Cold water supply pipes
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed, (BX) Armor clad
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: No
    25) The service drop wires are in contact with trees or vegetation. Recommend having a qualified tree service company or arborist prune or remove trees as necessary to prevent straining or abrading the service drop wires.
    26) The electric service to this property appears to be rated at substantially less than 200 amps, and may be inadequate for the client(s) needs. Recommend consulting with a qualified electrician about upgrading to a 200 amp service.
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 30 years
    Primary heating system energy source: Oil
    Primary heat system type: Baseboard, Hot water
    Primary A/C energy source: N/A
    Last service date: 2007 / Maroni and Sons / Old Saybrook
    : Model # L30PT
    Slantfin Corp.
    Serial # L43041476

    27) Because of the age and/or condition of this furnace, recommend that a qualified heating and cooling technician inspect the heat exchanger and perform a Carbon Monoxide test when it's serviced.

    Photo 30  
    Exhaust pipe needs to be repaired and resealed.
     

    28) Copper oil supply lines are exposed and subject to damage. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so oil supply lines are not subject to damage.

    Photo 32  
     

    29) The last service date of this system appears to be more than two years ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than two years ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed every few years in the future, or as per the contractor's recommendations.
    30) Recommend buying oil tank replacement insurance, available from many full-service oil providers. This can cover up to 100% of the replacement costs of an oil tank and usually costs less than a few dollars per month.

    Photo 31  
     

    31)   Tankless water heater attached to furnance needs to be assessed. Rust has formed and is compromising seal. Recommend heating and cooling contractor repair.

    Photo 29  
     
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): 60 psi
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Basement
    Location of main water meter: Basement
    Location of main fuel shut-off: Basement
    Visible fuel storage systems: Basement
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Galvanized steel
    Drain pipe material: Cast iron, Copper
    Waste pipe material: Cast iron
    32) The clothes dryer is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information on dryer safety issues, see http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html

    Photo 33  
     

    33) Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.

    Photo 34  
     

    34)   Outside vent for dryer is damaged and needs to be replaced to prevent outside intrusion.

    Photo 12  
     
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Masonry
    Chimney type: Masonry
    35) One or more chimney flues do not have a screened cover installed. Screened covers prevent the following:

  • Fire hazard from wood fire sparks and embers exiting flues
  • Wildlife (birds, rodents, raccoons, etc.) entering flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install screened cover(s) where missing. Screens should have holes 1/4 inch or larger.
    36) The masonry chimney's mortar is deteriorated and should be repaired to prevent further, significant deterioration. Recommend having a qualified chimney service contractor or mason evaluate chimney and repair as necessary. This will likely require repointing the mortar.

    Photo 26  
     

    37) The masonry chimney crown is deteriorated (cracked or broken) and needs repairs or replacement. The crown is meant to keep water off of the chimney structure. The chimney can be damaged by wet masonry going through freeze-thaw cycles. A properly constructed chimney crown should:

  • Be constructed using either pre-cast concrete slabs, cast-in-place steel reinforced concrete, solid stone, or metal
  • Be sloped down from the flue a minimum of 3 inches of fall per foot of run
  • Extend a minimum of 2-1/2 inches beyond the face of the chimney on all sides
  • Not directly contact the flue liner (if installed), and this gap should be filled with flexible caulk
  • Have flashing installed between the bottom of the crown and the top of the brick chimney

    A qualified chimney service contractor or mason should evaluate and repair or replace the crown as necessary.
    38) One or more chimney flues do not have a rainproof cover installed. They prevent the following:

  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install rainproof cover(s) where missing.

    Photo 18  
     

    39) Firebrick inside of fireplace needs to be repaired. A mason should be consulted.

    Photo 38  
     

    40) All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Steel
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    41) One or more exterior entrance doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

    Photo 14  
     
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    42) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    43) One or more kitchen appliances appear to be near, at, or beyond their intended service life of 10 to 15 years. Recommend budgeting for replacements as necessary.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    44) Caulk is missing or deteriorated along the base of one or more bathtubs, where flooring meets the tub. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the floor structure.
    45) Caulk is missing or deteriorated above one or more bathtubs, where the tub surround meets the tub. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the wall structure.
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    46) Guardrails are missing from one or more sections of decks or elevated surfaces with high drop-offs. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. Standard building practices require guardrails to be installed at drop-offs higher than 30 inches, but in some cases it is advised to install them at shorter drop-offs. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install guardrails as necessary and as per standard building practices.
    47) No smoke alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. A qualified electrician should install smoke alarms as per standard building practices (functioning one exists in hallways leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom, etc.). For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
    48) Squeaking or creaking noises occur when walking on one or more sections of flooring. This is usually caused by substandard construction practices where the subfloor decking is not adequately fastened to the framing below. For example, not enough glue was used and/or nails were used rather than screws. In most cases, this is only an annoyance rather than a structural problem. Various solutions such as Squeeeeek No More and Counter Snap fasteners exist to correct this. Repairs to eliminate the squeaks or creaks may be more or less difficult depending on the floor covering, and the access to the underside of the subfloor. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
    49) Carpeting in one or more rooms is soiled and/or stained. Recommend having carpeting professionally cleaned as necessary.
     

    Photo 1  

    Photo 2  
    Damage to garage trim.

    Photo 4  
    Stone wall needs repair.

    Photo 10  
    Damage to siding

    Photo 11  
    Outside faucet was turned off at time of inspection. Stains below faucet appear to be caused by leaking. Assess and repair.

    Photo 21  
    Trim on bay window is loose and needs to be repaired.

    Photo 22  
    Oil fill pipe needs to be chalked,

    Photo 23  
    Roof appears to be close to it's life expectancy. Roofing contractor should assess.

    Photo 36  
    Electrical panel located in garage.
     

     
    Thank you for choosing Closer Look Home Inspections LLC. If you have any questions do not hesitate to call me.

    Bob