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Clear-sighted Inspections

Website: http://www.inspecthumboldt.com
Email: mark@inspecthumboldt.com
Phone: (707) 280-8417
Inspector: Mark Friedrich

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  Mark
Property address:  Duplex

Burnt Ranch, CA
Inspection date:  Saturday, February 24, 2018

This report published on Monday, March 05, 2018 1:07:38 PM PST

Congratulations on buying your new home.

The process can be stressful, A home inspection is supposed to give you peace of mind, but often has the opposite effect. You will be asked to absorb a lot of information in a short time. This often includes a written report, checklist, environmental reports, and what the inspector himself says during the inspection. All this combined with the sellers disclosure and what you notice yourself makes the experience even more overwhelming. What should you do?

Relax. Most of your inspection will be maintenance recommendations, life expectancy and minor imperfections. These are nice to know about. However, the issues that really matter will fall into four categories:
1. Major defects. An example of this would be significant structural failure.
2. things that may lead to major defects. A small water leak coming from a piece of roof flashing, for example.
3. things that may hinder your ability to finance, legally occupy, or insure the home. Structural damage caused by termite infestation, for example.
4. safety hazards. Such as lack of GFCI– Protection

Anything in these categories should be corrected. Often a serious problem can be corrected inexpensively to protect both life and property (especially in categories 2 and 4).

Most sellers are honest and are often surprised to learn of defects uncovered during the inspection. Realize that sellers are under no obligation to repair everything mentioned in the report.

Keep this in perspective. Don't kill your deal over things that don't matter. It is inappropriate to demand that a seller address deferred maintenance, conditions already listed on the sellers disclosure, or nit-picky items
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a safety hazard
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
CommentFor your information

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at https://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Grounds
Roof
Exterior
Interior, Doors and Windows, Unit A
Interior, Doors and Windows, Unit B
Kitchen, unit B
Kitchen, Unit A
Bathroom, Unit A
Bathroom, Unit B
Panels.
Electrical
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Water Heater
Water Heater, unit B on porch
Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition unit A
Attic and Roof Structure
Crawl Space and Foundation

View summary


General Information
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Present during inspection: Client, Tenant, Realtor
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions during inspection: Dry (no rain)
Temperature during inspection: Cool
Type of building: Duplex
Buildings inspected: One house
Number of residential units inspected: 2
Occupied: Yes, Furniture or stored items were present
Excluded in the inspection: Septic (beyond the scope of this inspection) http://inspecthumboldt.com/sop, Well (beyond the scope of this inspection) http://inspecthumboldt.com/sop

1) - For a copy of the Standards of Practice for Clear-sighted Inspections please visit the link below. This very important document lists clearly what is and what is not included in this home inspection.

http://inspecthumboldt.com/sop

Grounds
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Site profile: Stairstepped
Condition of driveway: Appeared serviceable
Driveway material: Asphalt
Condition of sidewalks and/or patios: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Sidewalk material: Wood

2) Safety, Repair/Maintain - Cracks, settlement and/or deterioration resulting in trip hazards were found in the sidewalks or patios. For safety reasons, recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary to eliminate trip hazards. for example by some combination of either/or grinding the high spot down and ramping the low spot up with patch material.

3) Monitor - Pavement sloped down towards building perimeters in one or more areas. This may result in water accumulating around building foundations or underneath buildings. Monitor these areas in the future, especially during and after periods of rain. If significant amounts of water are found to accumulate, then recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, by installing drain(s) or removing old pavement and installing new.

I didn’t get a picture, but this area is the parking spots in front of the duplex. The area slopes towards the duplex. There is a curb there but it may drain towards the foundation when it turns the corner and goes down the hill.

Roof
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Roof inspection method: Traversed
Condition of roof surface material: Appeared serviceable
Service life remaining: 10-15 years remaining
Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: One
Condition of exposed flashings: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)

4) Repair/Replace - Extensions such as splash blocks or drain pipes for one or more downspouts were missing. Water should be directed away from the building foundation. Recommend that a qualified person install, replace or repair extensions as necessary so rainwater drains away from the structure.
Photo
Photo 4-1
 

5) Repair/Maintain - One or more roof flashings were lifting and/or substandard. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

6) Repair/Maintain - One or more gutters and/or downspouts were loose, incomplete and/or leaking. Rainwater can come in contact with the building exterior or accumulate around the building foundation as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

7) Maintain - Moss was growing on the roof. As a result, shingles can lift or be damaged. Recommend treating the affected areas with a spray or sprinkle on moss treatment and allowing the moss to die and wash away. Never scrub or power wash a roof because it can damage the shingles.
Photo
Photo 7-1
 

Exterior
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Condition of deck, patio and/or porch covers: Appeared serviceable
Condition of decks, porches and/or balconies: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below), Near, at or beyond service life
Deck, porch and/or balcony material: Wood
Condition of stairs, handrails and guardrails: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Exterior stair material: Wood
Wall inspection method: Viewed from ground
Condition of Exterior walls and Trim: Requires repair, replacement or evaluation
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood, Wood Veneer

8) Safety, Repair/Replace - Flashing was missing on the deck ledger board. Missing flashing at this location can cause moisture to accumulate between the ledger boards and the building. Fungal rot may occur in this area and cause the ledger board fasteners to fail. This is a potential safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified contractor install flashing above ledger boards per standard building practices.

9) Safety, Repair/Replace - The ledger board appeared to be attached with nails only. It is better to bolt the ledger to the structure it's attached to. Recommend having a qualified person retrofit the ledger board. For example by bolting the ledger board.
Photo
Photo 9-1
 

10) Safety, Repair/Replace - Guardrails at one or more locations with drop-offs higher than 30 inches had gaps that were too large. This poses a safety hazard for children (e.g. falling, getting stuck in railing). Guardrails should not have gaps or voids that allow passage of a sphere equal to or greater than 4 inches in diameter, or 6 inches in diameter at triangular spaces between stair edges and guardrails. At a minimum, the client should be aware of this hazard. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair or replace guardrails per standard building practices.

11) Repair/Replace - Deteriorated trim was observed in one or more locations sections of, siding, trim and/or window sills. Conducive conditions for deterioration should be corrected (e.g. wood-soil contact, reverse perimeter slope). Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.

12) Repair/Replace - Many sections of siding and/or trim were deteriorated. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install siding or trim as necessary.

13) Repair/Maintain - Soil was in contact with or too close to siding, trim or structural wood. This is a conducive condition for deterioration. Recommend grading or removing soil as necessary to maintain an adequate clearance.
Photo
Photo 13-1
 

14) Maintain - The paint or stain finish over much of the entire structure was failing (e.g. peeling, faded, worn, thinning). Siding and trim with a failing finish can be damaged by moisture. Recommend that a qualified contractor prep (e.g. clean, scrape, sand, prime, caulk) and repaint or restain the entire building exterior per standard building practices. Any repairs needed to the siding or trim should be made prior to this.

15) Comment - Trip hazard
Photo
Photo 15-1
 

16) Comment - Deck near the end of life
Photo
Photo 16-1
 

Interior, Doors and Windows, Unit A
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Condition of exterior entry doors: Appeared serviceable
Exterior door material: Metal
Condition of interior doors: Appeared serviceable
Condition of windows and skylights: Appeared serviceable
Wall type or covering: Drywall or plaster
Ceiling type or covering: Drywall or plaster
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable

Interior, Doors and Windows, Unit B
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Condition of exterior entry doors: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of interior doors: Appeared serviceable
Condition of windows and skylights: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of walls and ceilings: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Wall type or covering: Drywall or plaster
Ceiling type or covering: Drywall or plaster
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable, Poor
Flooring type or covering: Carpet, Vinyl, linoleum or marmoleum

17) Safety, Evaluate - Some ceilings in this structure had ceiling tiles possibly installed prior to the mid-1980s. This material may contain asbestos, which is a known health hazard. Laws were passed in the United States in 1978 limiting the amount of asbestos used in residential structures.

In most cases, when the material is intact and in good condition, keeping it encapsulated with paint and not disturbing it may effectively eliminate the health hazard. If the client wishes to remove the material, or plans to disturb it through remodeling, they should have it tested by a qualified lab and/or consult with a qualified contractor.

Research asbestos removal on the EPA website:
https://www.epa.gov/asbestos/protect-your-family#whattodo
Photo
Photo 17-1
 

18) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more sections of ceilings were sagging. This can be caused by different things (e.g. loose drywall or plaster, floor or ceiling joists sagging, floor or ceiling joists installed with the crown down). Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 18-1
 

19) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Stains and elevated levels of moisture were found in one or more wall, ceiling areas. The stains appear to be due to condensation or leak. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 19-1
 

20) Repair/Replace - One or more windows that were designed to open and close were stuck shut. Recommend that a qualified person repair windows as necessary so they open and close easily.

21) Comment - One or more exterior doors had minor damage and/or deterioration. Although serviceable, the client may wish to repair or replace such doors for appearances' sake.

22) Comment - Possible asbestos tile. See link regarding asbestos listed under the ceiling tiles.
Photo
Photo 22-1
 

Kitchen, unit B
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Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable, Poor
GFCI Present in the kitchen: No.Outlets In the kitchen had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. If not GFCI-protected, receptacles in wet areas pose a shock hazard.
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable, Poor
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable, Poor
Condition of under-sink food disposal: N/A (none installed)
Condition of ranges, cooktops and/or ovens: Appeared serviceable
Range, cooktop, oven type: Electric
Type of ventilation: Nearby window

23) - No water in unit B low flow from creek

Kitchen, Unit A
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Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
GFCI Present in the kitchen: Yes
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of under-sink food disposal: N/A (none installed)
Condition of ranges, cooktops and/or ovens: Appeared serviceable
Type of ventilation: Nearby window

Bathroom, Unit A
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Location: 3/4 bath
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable, Fair
GFCI outlets present in the bathroom?: Yes
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable, Good
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable, Good
Condition of toilets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of bathtubs and related plumbing: None
Condition of shower(s) and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable, Good
Bathroom and laundry ventilation type: with individual ducts

Bathroom, Unit B
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Location: Full bath
Condition of counters: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
GFCI outlets present in the bathroom?: No.Outlets In the Bathroom had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. If not GFCI-protected, receptacles in wet areas pose a shock hazard.
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable, Poor
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable, Fair
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable, Not determined (water supply off, obscured by stored items, etc.)
Condition of toilets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of bathtubs and related plumbing: None
Condition of shower(s) and related plumbing: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below), Poor
Condition of ventilation systems: Appeared serviceable
Bathroom and laundry ventilation type: Windows

24) Repair/Replace - The shower enclosure was deteriorated, damaged or substandard. Water can damage the wall structure as a result. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair or replace the surround as necessary.

Panels.
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Electric service condition: Appeared serviceable
Primary service type: Overhead
Service voltage (volts): 120-240
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Main disconnect rating (amps): 100, ample for a home of this configuration, Both meters have 100 amps for a total of 200 amps.
Location of main service panel #A: Building exterior
Location of sub-panel #C: Unit A
Location of sub-panel #D: Unit B, bedroom
Branch circuit wiring type: non-metallic sheathed
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: None visible

Electrical
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Condition of branch circuit wiring: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Branch circuit wiring type: non-metallic sheathed
Smoke alarms installed: No, recommend install
Carbon monoxide alarms installed: No, recommend install

25) Safety, Repair/Replace - Wire splices were exposed and were not contained in a covered junction box. This is a potential shock or fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing permanently mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

26) Safety, Repair/Replace - Smoke alarms were missing from one or more bedrooms. Smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning alarm exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, in each bedroom, on each level and in any attached garage.


Good in unit A missing in B

27) Safety, Repair/Maintain - Cover plates for outlets or switches were missing or broken in the crawlspace. Recommend replacing cover plates.
Photo
Photo 27-1
 

28) Safety, Repair/Maintain - Carbon monoxide alarms were missing . This is a potential safety hazard. Some states and/or municipalities require CO alarms to be installed in the vicinity of each sleeping area, on each level and in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. Recommend installing additional carbon monoxide alarms per these standards. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?COALRM

29) Comment - Many and/or In unit B 3-slot electric receptacles were found with an open ground. Some appliances require a ground. Examples of such appliances include computers and related hardware, refrigerators, freezers, portable air conditioners, clothes washers, aquarium pumps, and electrically operated gardening tools.

Plumbing / Fuel Systems
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Condition of service and main line: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Water service: Private well
Condition of supply lines: Appeared serviceable
Supply pipe material: Copper, Galvanized steel
Condition of drain pipes: Appeared serviceable
Drain pipe material: Plastic, Galvanized steel
Condition of waste lines: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Waste pipe material: Cast iron
Vent pipe condition: Appeared serviceable
Vent pipe material: Galvanized steel
Sump pump installed: None visible
Sewage ejector pump installed: None visible
Condition of fuel system: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)

30) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more leaks were found in waste pipes or fittings. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 30-1
 

31) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The water supply pressure was below 40 pounds per square inch (PSI), and the flow appeared to be inadequate. 40-80 PSI is considered the normal range for water pressure in a home. The inspector performed a "functional flow test" during the inspection, where multiple fixtures are run simultaneously, and found there to be low flow. For example, the shower flow decreased significantly when the toilet was flushed. Recommend that a qualified plumber evaluate and repair or make modifications as necessary. Installing a pressure-boosting system is one possible solution. For information on these systems, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?LPRESSURE

32) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Significant corrosion was found in some waste pipes or fittings. This can indicate past leaks, or that leaks are likely to occur in the future. Recommend that a qualified plumber evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 32-1
 

33) Comment - Unconventional plug
Photo
Photo 33-1
 

34) - Propane was disconnected from unit A. Plumbing appeared present but needs modification.

Water Heater
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Condition of water heater: Appeared serviceable
Type: Tank
Energy source: Electricity
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Estimated age: 2014
Location of water heater: Back porch
Pressure/Temperature blow off valve installed: Yes

Water Heater, unit B on porch
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Condition of water heater: Appeared serviceable
Type: Tank
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Location of water heater: Back porch
Pressure/Temperature blow off valve installed: Yes
Condition of burners: Appeared serviceable
Condition of venting system: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)

35) Evaluate, Comment - The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8-12 years. The inspector was unable to determine the age of the water heater due to the manufacturer's label being obscured, no serial number being visible, or the serial number not clearly indicating the age. The client should be aware that this water heater may be near, at or beyond its useful life and may need replacing at any time. Recommend attempting to determine the water heater's age.

If found to be near, at or beyond its useful lifespan, recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future, or considering replacement now before any leaks occur. The client should be aware that significant flooding can occur if the water heater does fail. If not replaced now, consider having a qualified person install a catch pan and drain or a water alarm to help prevent damage if water does leak.

36) - Combustible near fule
Photo
Photo 36-1
 

Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition unit A
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General heating system type(s): Wall Heater
Condition of forced air heating/(cooling) system: Not determined (inaccessible, obscured, or power, gas or oil service off), Not hooked up with propane
Estimated age of forced air furnace: New
Condition of controls: Not determined (system inoperable)

Attic and Roof Structure
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Attic inspection method: Viewed from hatch(es), Too much insulation to traverse without making a mess.
Condition of roof structure: Appeared serviceable
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling joists
Condition of insulation in attic (ceiling, skylight chase, etc.): Appeared serviceable
Ceiling insulation material: Cellulose loose fill
Approximate average depth of insulation: 10”
Condition of roof ventilation: Appeared serviceable

Crawl Space and Foundation
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Crawl space inspection method: Traversed
Soil Condition: Dry, Wet, Muddy, Variable
Condition of floor substructure above: Appeared serviceable
Pier or support post material: Wood
Beam material: Solid wood
Floor structure above: 2x6 tongue and groove
Structure is bolted to the foundation: Yes
Condition of insulation underneath floor above: Not applicable, none installed
Condition of vapor barrier: Not applicable, none installed
Condition of crawl space ventilation: Appeared serviceable
Ventilation type: without vents
Condition of foundation and footings: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below), Concrete step wall
Foundation/stem wall material: Poured in place concrete
Footing material (under foundation stem wall): Poured in place concrete
Footings observed under piers: Yes

37) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more isolated footings or sections of footings or foundations were undermined. Soil has either eroded out from underneath or has been excavated too close to these areas. Standard building practices typically require undisturbed soil to extend at least a foot horizontally out from the edge of footings and then slope down no more steeply than 45 degrees. Otherwise soil can collapse from beneath the footing(s). Recommend that a qualified contractor or engineer evaluate and determine what repairs if any should be made. If repairs are needed, a qualified contractor should make them.

38) Repair/Maintain, Evaluate - Moderate cracks (1/8 inch - 3/4 inch) and/or leaning were found in the foundation. This may be a structural concern or an indication that settlement is ongoing. The client should consider hiring qualified contractors and/or engineers as necessary for further evaluation. Such contractors may include:
  • Foundation repair contractors who may prescribe repairs, and will give cost estimates for such repairs
  • Masonry contractors who repair and/or replace brick veneer
  • Geotechnical engineers who attempt to determine if settlement is ongoing, and the cause of the settlement
  • Structural engineers who determine if repairs are necessary, and prescribe those repairs
At a minimum, recommend sealing cracks to prevent water infiltration. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including hydraulic cement, resilient caulks and epoxy sealants.
Photo
Photo 38-1
 

This report is the property of Clear-sighted Inspections and our client. Clear-sighted inspections is not responsible for misinterpretations by 3rd parties. The report is not transferable. The inspection was performed according to Clear-sighted Inspections Standards of Practice, which is available prior to inspection.