View as PDF


Choice Home Inspections, LLC

Website: http://www.choicehomeinspections.biz
Email: kevin@choicehomeinspections.biz
Phone: (518) 857-2316
296 Waters Rd 
East Greenbush NY 12061-3821
Inspector: Kevin Dougherty NYS Lic #16000030073

 

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): John Jones
Property address: 123 Abc St
Anywhere, NY 12345
Inspection date: 12/14/2010
This report published on Sunday, January 09, 2011 1:56:13 PM EST

View summary page

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
Exterior
Roof
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Crawl space
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
General information
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Foundation material: Concrete block
Wall covering: Vinyl
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Hollow core wood
1) Perimeter pavement slopes towards structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Recommend having a qualified contractor make repairs as necessary so perimeter pavement slopes down and away from the structure.
2) Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.

Photo 6  

Photo 7  

3) Siding is incomplete or missing in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should install siding where missing to prevent water and vermin intrusion.

Photo 2  
 

4) One or more soffit vent screens are missing and/or deteriorated. Birds and vermin may enter the attic because of this. Screens should be replaced or repaired where necessary, or installed where missing.

Photo 4  
 

5) Exterior painted finish of concreter block is deteriorating. Recommend scrape and repainting/parging
6) Recommend Installing Gutters on side of eave of home to help keep rain water from entering basement.
7) Recommend scraping and painting trim around windows to prolong life of wood trim.

Photo 5  
 

8) Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit:
The Ins and Outs of Caulking.

9) Portions of the exterior along the perimeter of the foundation was covered with snow.
 
Roof Return to table of contents
Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars
Roof type: Gable, Shed
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles, Rolled
Estimated age of roof: 10
Gutter & downspout material: NoneRecommend Installation of Gutters
Roof ventilation: Adequate
10) The roof was partially obscured by snow and couldn't be fully evaluated.

Photo 2  
 
 
Electric service Return to table of contents
Primary service type: Overhead
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 150
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: Basement
Location of main disconnect: Top bank of breakers in main service panel (split bus)
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
System ground: Cold water supply pipes
Main disconnect rating (amps): Not applicable, no single main disconnect
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
Smoke detectors present: No
11) The service drop wire insulation is frayed and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. The utility company should evaluate and make repairs or replace wires as necessary.

Photo 3  
 

12) The service drop wires are less than 3 feet from one or more doors, balconies, decks and/or windows that open. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician and/or the utility company should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Photo 8  
 

13) One or more overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses) are "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire. This is a safety hazard since the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks and fires may result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Photo 9  
 
 
Water heater Return to table of contents
Estimated age: 5
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Manufacturer: Whirlpool
Model: BFG1F4040
14) No drain line is installed for the temperature-pressure relief valve. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified plumber should install a drain line as per standard building practices. For example, extending to 6 inches from the floor, or routed so as to drain outside.

Photo 10  
 
 
Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
Estimated age: 10
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Steam
Manufacturer: National US Radiator
Model: 109-5
15) What appears to be asbestos is visible on some pipes. However, it appears to be intact and not significantly deteriorated. The client may wish to have this material tested at a qualified lab. For information on asbestos hazards in the home, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/453.html

Photo 11  

Photo 12  

16) Radiators throughout home should be monitored. Relief valves were emitting steam and condensation. This may be an indication of possible problems with the system as the amount of steam/moisture seemed to be excessive.
Recommend having a qualified professional evaluate prior to closing.

Photo 18  

Photo 19  
 
Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
Location of main water shut-off valve: Front of Basement
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Galvanized steel
Supply pipe material: Galvanized steel
Vent pipe material: Galvanized steel
Drain pipe material: Galvanized steel, Copper
Waste pipe material: Cast iron
17) SInk Faucets near laundry area were corroded and in need of repair.

Photo 13  
 

18) Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
 
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
Chimney type: Masonry-Adequate condition
19) One or more chimney flues do not have a screened cover installed. Screened covers prevent the following:

  • Fire hazard from wood fire sparks and embers exiting flues
  • Wildlife (birds, rodents, raccoons, etc.) entering flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install screened cover(s) where missing. Screens should have holes 1/4 inch or larger.
    20) One or more chimney flues do not have a rainproof cover installed. They prevent the following:

  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install rainproof cover(s) where missing.

    It appears that the lack of a cover has already contributed to deterioration of the masonry near the boiler in the basement.
    Recommend repointing this area shown in photo

    Photo 15  
     
     
    Crawl space Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
    Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Pier or support post material: Wood
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Vapor barrier present: Yes
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Pier or support post material: Steel
    Beam material: Solid wood
    21) Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. For example, water stains and/or efflorescence on the foundation or floor, water stains at bases of support posts, etc. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.

    Photo 16  
     

    22) Standing water and/or wet areas were found in one or more sections of the basement. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. A qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.

    Photo 17  
     
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    23) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    24) Drainage, Cabinets, Countertops, and lighting all seemed adequate
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    25) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    26) One or more bathrooms with a shower do not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.
    27) Faucets, drainage, and toilet all appeared adequate
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    28) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    29) Trip hazard(s) exist at stairs due to non-uniform riser heights. Standard building practices call for riser heights not to vary more than 3/8 inch on a flight of stairs. At a minimum, the client(s) should be aware of this hazard, especially when guests who are not familiar with the stairs are present. Ideally a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace stairs so all riser heights are within 3/8 inch of each other.

    Photo 14  
     

    30) No smoke alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. A qualified electrician should install smoke alarms as per standard building practices (functioning one exists in hallways leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom, etc.). For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    31) The sash spring mechanism(s) in one or more windows are broken or loose. A qualified contractor or service technician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so the window(s) operate as intended (open easily, stay open without support, close easily, etc.).
    32) One or more windows that were built to open, will not open, or open only minimally due to their being painted shut, damaged and/or deteriorated in some way. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary so windows open fully, and open and close easily.
    33) Lock mechanisms on one or more windows are missing and/or damaged so that they are inoperable. Repairs should be made by a qualified contractor or service technician so that windows lock and unlock easily.
     
    General information Return to table of contents
    Inspector's name: Kevin Dougherty
    Type of building: Single family
    Age of building: 80
    Inspection Fee: 325.00
    Payment method: Cash
    Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
    Occupied: Yes
    Weather conditions: Clear
    Temperature: Cold-30 F
    Ground condition: Frozen
     
    Thank you for your business