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Check Mark Services LLC

Website: http://www.checkmarkservice.com
Email: info@checkmarkservice.com
Inspector's email: info@checkmarkservice.com
Phone: (914) 646-7141
Inspector's phone: (914) 646-7141
Inspector: Jeffrey Molloy
New York State License # 16000013750,
Stephen Dolph License # 16000049100
NACHI Certified (www.nachi.org)
Radon / Mold Certified (http://iac2.org/)
Infrared Certified (www.infrared-certified.com)

 

Residental Structure and Systems Report

Client(s):  Mr. & Mrs John Doe
Property address:  123 Main Street
Anytown, NY 12345
Inspection date:  Monday, January 01, 2001

This report published on Saturday, October 29, 2016 10:47:18 AM EDT

This report is the exclusive property of Check Mark Services and the client(s) listed in the report title. Release or use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a potential risk of personal injury or death without regard to cost of repair
Concern typeMajor Cost ConcernCorrection most likely involves a significant near term expense exceeding $1,000
Concern typeReplace or Repair - MajorInvolves major repairs or replacement cost
Concern typeReplace or Repair - ModerateRecommend repair and/or maintenance with potential significant expense
Concern typeReplace or Repair - MinorCorrection likely involves only a reasonable expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance (Variable Cost)
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist - Significant
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeServiceableItem or component appears to be performing its intended function and can be maintained for future use.
Concern typeFYIFor your information.
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms that, when not corrected will likely result in future problems (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Attic
Garage
Electric service
Water heater
Plumbing and laundry
Heating and cooling
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Crawl space
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior Rooms
Pool House, Barns, Sheds Etc.
Additional Photos and Information
Structural Pest Findings


General information
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Key to Elements - Arrows and Circles- Elements are color coded as to severity: Green = A desirable condition or Element
Red = Dangerous, Major Safety, or Major Cost Item
Yellow = Current or Future Problem if left unattended. Repair $ will increase with time.
Blue = Maintain or logical area for improvement.
White and Black = Points if interest or information
Report number: 060709
Structures inspected: Residence, Pool House, Garage
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 60 Years
Property owner's name: Mr & Mrs Smith
Time started: 9:00 am
Time finished: 3:10 pm
Present during inspection: Property owner(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Rain
Temperature: Cool 63 degrees F.
Ground condition: Wet
Front of structure faces: West
Main entrance faces: West
Foundation type: Unfinished basement, Finished basement, Crawlspace
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Security system, Irrigation system, Swimming pool, Hot tub, Playground equipment, Built-in sound system, Intercom system

1) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygenists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:

2) Some wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by furniture and/or stored items. Some areas couldn't be evaluated.

Exterior
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Footing material: Not visible
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete, Concrete block, Stone
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood shingles, Stone veneer
Driveway material: Asphalt
Sidewalk material: Paving stones
Exterior door material: Solid core wood, Solid core steel

3) One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in are loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 3-1
Plug is too large to allow cover to close!
Photo
Photo 3-2
Supply wire installation could be better.
Photo
Photo 3-3
Secondary A/C equipment electric box could use additional support. A/C refrigerant lines subjest to damage from lawn care equipnent.
 

4) Stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 4-1
Safety hand rail is suggested for pool steps.
Photo
Photo 4-2
More than 3 steps normally requires hand rail, especially in wet areas and uneven surfaces.

5) One or more Exterior outlets are not protected by ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric receptacles . This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
Photo
Photo 5-1
GFCI protection is suggested/required on all outside electrical outlets.
 

6) One or more exterior disconnect switches, such as for an outdoor spa, have exposed wiring or components when the cover is opened or removed. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock, especially for children. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary so the risk of shock is eliminated. Note that a lock should not be installed on the cover(s) because the disconnect device(s) will be made inaccessible in the event of an emergency.
Photo
Photo 6-1
Open slot in equipment panel is dangerous! Would suggest GFCI protection for all equipment.
 

7) Cracks, deterioration, leaning and/or bowing were found in one or more retaining walls. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace wall(s) as necessary.
Photo
Photo 7-1
Retaining wall at rear basement steps has horizontal failure.
Upper section of wall is pushing inward. This will only get worse with time.
 

8) Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.
Photo
Photo 8-1
Roof shingle to close to siding material. Areas on all gable /dormers are starting to fail.
Photo
Photo 8-2
Clogged gutters and additional example of moisture damage.
Photo
Photo 8-3
Third dormer with damage.
Photo
Photo 8-4
Area (yellow) behind chimney catches water and snow.
Siding damage will result due to proximity of materials

9) One or more trip hazards were found in sidewalk and/or patio sections due to cracks, settlement and/or heaving. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary to eliminate trip hazards.
Photo
Photo 9-1
Damaged pavers to swing set area.
 

10) Soil is in contact with or less than six inches from siding and/or trim. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Soil should be graded and/or removed as necessary so there are at least six inches of space between the siding and trim and the soil below.
Photo
Photo 10-1
Again, Soil is in close proximity to siding materials.
 

11) One or more downspouts are dented, damaged and/or crushed. This can restrict the water flow and result in clogging and overflowing gutters. Water may accumulate around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Damaged downspouts should be repaired or replaced as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

12) Window glazing putty at one or more windows is missing and/or deteriorated. Putty should be replaced and/or installed where necessary. For more information on replacing window putty, visit: http://www.oldhouseweb.com/stories/Detailed/12216.shtml

13) Gutter installation in one or more areas is too close, or cut into siding elements. This can cause water infiltration behind the siding elements and promote water damage and insect infiltration.
Photo
Photo 13-1
Gutter "cut in" to siding material will eventually cause wood rot.
Hidden damage may already be present.
 

14) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:

15) One or more gutters were leaking or overflowing due to blockages in the system. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should clean, repair, or replace gutters where necessary.
Photo
Photo 15-1
Typical Clogged Gutter. Promotes Facia Rot and insect activity. Easy to corect.
Photo
Photo 15-2
Clogged gutters and additional example of moisture damage.
Photo
Photo 15-3
Clogged gutter "dumps" water on rear balcony.
 

16) Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.

17) One or more electric receptacles appear to have no power. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
Photo
Photo 17-1
GFCI protection is suggested/required on all outside electrical outlets.
 

18) One or more exhaust duct end caps are missing, damaged and/or deteriorated. Their purpose is to prevent unconditioned air from entering the house, and keep out birds, rodents and bugs. Blocked ducts can cause fan motors and/or clothes dryers to overheat and may pose a fire hazard. New vent cap(s) should be installed where necessary.
Photo
Photo 18-1
No screen in vent hood allows insects and rodents an entry point.
Photo
Photo 18-2
Vent cover is open and unscreened.
Photo
Photo 18-3
Uncapped Dryer vent. Allows for rodent nesting
 

19) One or more of the Exterior trim elements is loose or damaged.
Photo
Photo 19-1
Example of loose (plastic) shutter. Some others have minor damage.
 

20) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

21) Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit The Ins and Outs of Caulking.

22) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to monitor the condition.

23) One or more sections of foundation and/or exterior walls are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from vegetation, debris and/or stored items.

24) One or more unlined wooden planter boxes are attached to the side of the house. Wood soil contact exists in such boxes and is a conducive condition for wood-destroying insects and organisms. Recommend either removing them, or modifying them so that no wood-soil contact exists (install plastic or metal liners), and so that they are well drained.

25) Additional notes:
Photo
Photo 25-1
Recent paint. Note grinding marks from paint removal.
Photo
Photo 25-2
Curling of cedar shakes (typical)
Remove old antena if not in use.

Roof
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Roof inspection method: Viewed from eaves on ladder, Viewed from ground with binoculars, Viewed from windows
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum, Steel, Copper
Roof type: Gable, Low Slope Shed
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles, Wood shakes, Rolled
Estimated age of roof: 8 - 12 years

26) This asphalt or fiberglass composition roof surface has two or more layers of roofing materials. When this roof is replaced, recommend a complete "tear off", where all existing layers of roofing are removed before installing new roofing materials. For 20-year rated composition shingles, additional layers of material reduce the new roof material's lifespan as follows:
  • 16-20 years - First roof
  • 12-16 years - Second layer on existing roof

Removing existing roofing materials will significantly increase the cost of the next roof.

Also,because the original cedar roof surface is still present, the structure below the surface is "skip sheathed" where batten boards rather than sheets of plywood support the roof surface. Installing a composition fiberglass or asphalt roof in the future will require the additional expense of installing sheathing, such as plywood or oriented strand board (OSB) over the batten boards.
Photo
Photo 26-1
Three Roofing Layers. Will be costly to replace!
 

27) One or more sections of flashing at the base of the chimney are deteriorated and/or substandard. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

28) One or more composition shingles are damaged, deteriorated and/or missing, and should be replaced. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
Photo
Photo 28-1
Example of loose roof shingle.
 

29) One or more composition shingles have raised, most likely due to nails that have loosened. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as resetting nails.
Photo
Photo 29-1
Repairs or poor installation technique on roof. Note exposed nails. If not leaking now these will leak eventually.
 

30) Roofing nails in one or more areas have loosened or backed out. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as resetting nails and applying sealant.

31) Debris such as leaves, needles, seeds, etc. have accumulated on the roof. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since water may not flow easily off the roof, and may enter gaps in the roof surface. Leaks may occur as a result. Debris should be cleaned from the roof now and as necessary in the future.
Photo
Photo 31-1
Typical Clogged Gutter. Promotes Facia Rot and insect activity. Easy to corect.
 

Attic
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Inspection method: Viewed from hatch, Traversed
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Insulation material: Mineral wool roll or batt, Cellulose loose fill
Insulation depth: 6 inches
Insulation estimated R value: 19

32) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

33) The ceiling insulation's R rating is significantly less than what's recommended for this area. Recommend having a qualified contractor install additional insulation as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency.

34) One or more areas of the roof structure were wet or had elevated levels of moisture at the time of the inspection. There appears to be an active leak in the roof or structure exterior. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 34-1
Active water leak at garage chimney area in attic!!!
 

35) Ventilation is substandard in the attic. Inadequate attic ventilation may result in high attic and roof surface temperatures, reduce the life of the roof covering materials and increase cooling costs. High levels of moisture are also likely, and can be a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require one square foot of vent area for 150 to 200 square feet of attic space. Vents should be evenly distributed between soffits, ridges and at corners to promote air circulation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install vents as per standard building practices.

36) Conducive conditions One or more exhaust fans have no duct and terminate in the attic. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. A qualified contractor should install ducts and vent caps as necessary and as per standard building practices so exhaust air is vented outside. Better building practices call for R8 rated insulation on these ducts.

37) No insulation or weatherstrip is installed at the attic access hatch. Weatherstrip should be installed around the hatch to prevent heated interior air from entering attic. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.

38) The attic exhaust fan was inoperable during the inspection. Recommend consulting with the property owner(s) as to how it operates and/or having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair if necessary.
Photo
Photo 38-1
Non-working attic vent fan.
 

39) Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may be caused by a past leak. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about past leaks. The client(s) should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

40) Some attic areas were inaccessible due to stored items, lack of permanently installed walkways, the possibility of damage to loose fill insulation, and/or low height. These areas are excluded from this inspection.

Garage
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41) No infared "photo eye" devices are installed for the vehicle door's electric door opener. They've been required on all vehicle door openers since 1993 and improve safety by triggering the vehicle door's auto-reverse feature without need for the door to come in contact with the object, person or animal that's preventing it from closing. Recommend considering having a qualified contractor install these devices for improved safety. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html or http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html

42) Safety containment cables are missing for one or more vehicle door springs. This is a safety hazard. Safety containment cables prevent springs from snapping free and causing damage or injury. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs or replace components as necessary. For more information: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J1Od3T4KnOA
http://www.homedepot.com/p/IDEAL-Security-Garage-Door-Safety-Cables-2-Pack-SK7136/203468168

43) The vehicle door has an electric opener installed, and the manual lock mechanism on the door hasn't been disabled. Damage or injury may occur if the vehicle door opener is operated with the manual lock engaged. A qualified contractor should disable or remove the lock mechanism.

44) Extension cords are being used as permanent wiring in one or more areas. They should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring poses a fire and shock hazard, and is an indication that wiring is inadequate and should be updated. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure, resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, and sparks that could start a fire. Extension cords should be removed as necessary, or a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install additional circuits and/or electric receptacles.
Photo
Photo 44-1
Non professional wiring.
 

45) The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

Electric service
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Primary service type: Overhead
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 200
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: Garage
Location of sub panels: 1 in Wine Room, 1 in Unfinished Area, 1 at top of basement stairs, 1 in closet of home office area.
Location of main disconnect: Garage next to main panel
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum, Copper
System ground: Cold water supply pipes
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed, (BX) Armor clad, Copper
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
Smoke detectors present: Yes, Whole house monitored alarm system

46) This property has one or more Federal Pacific Electric brand main service or sub panels that use "Stab-Lok" circuit breakers. Both double and single pole versions of these circuit breakers are known to fail by not tripping when they are supposed to. This is a potential but serious fire hazard. Recommend having a qualified electrician replace any and all Federal Pacific panels. For more information, visit: http://www.inspect-ny.com/fpe/fpepanel.htm

If the Federal Pacific panel(s) are not replaced, then a qualified electrician should thoroughly evaluate the panel(s) and make repairs as necessary. Recommend installing smoke detectors above Federal Pacific panels.
Photo
Photo 46-1
Federal Pacific "Stab-Lock" Panels have had a history of problems. Strongly recommend replacement.
 

47) One or more wires in the main service panel appear to be undersized for their overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 47-1
Check for possible breaker / wire gauage miss-match.
No panel disconect is a safety concern.
Photo
Photo 47-2
Main service disconnest is located in Garage.
200 Amp Capacity. Will shut ALL sub-panels.
Photo
Photo 47-3
Old main Panel now provides service to sub panels. Not well marked- this is a safety hazard.
 

48) One or more overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses) are "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire. This is a safety hazard since the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks and fires may result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

49) Neutral and equipment ground conductors are combined at one or more sub-panels. This should only occur in the main service panel, and is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. Neutral conductors should be attached to a "floating" neutral bar not bonded to the panel, while grounding conductors should be attached to a separate grounding bar bonded to the sub panel. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

50) Water Meter does not have a Grounding Electrode Bonding Jumper. This can be corrected easily and at low cost.
Photo
Photo 50-1
Water meter should have "Grounding Jumper" Inexpensive and a good idea.
 

51) The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in the main service or sub panels is missing, unreadable or incomplete. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate.
Photo
Photo 51-1
This panel not opened for inspection at owners request due to paint finishes. (Good quality panel)
Photo
Photo 51-2
Old main Panel now provides service to sub panels. Not well marked- this is a safety hazard.

52)   Items of note:
Photo
Photo 52-1
Overhead electrial service entrance looks good.
Photo
Photo 52-2
Rusted box in Wine cellar needs replacement.

Water heater
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Estimated age: 3-5 years
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas Via Boiler Zone
Capacity (in gallons): Not visible APPX 90 -120
Model: Weil McClain
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 138 F.

53) The hot water temperature is greater than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of scalding. The thermostat should be adjusted so the water temperature doesn't exceed 120 degrees. For more information on scalding dangers, visit http://www.tap-water-burn.com/

Plumbing and laundry
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Water pressure (psi): 55
Location of main water shut-off valve: Utility room in basement
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Copper, Galvanized steel
Supply pipe material: Copper, Galvanized steel
Vent pipe material: Galvanized steel, Cast iron
Drain pipe material: Galvanized steel, Cast iron
Waste pipe material: Galvanized steel, Cast iron

54) The clothes dryer(s) is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information on dryer safety issues, see http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html
Photo
Photo 54-1
Dryer Vent pipe should be replaced with semi-rigid or rigid duct.
Flexible ducts should not penetrate walls or run through floors or ceilings.
 

55) One or both sewer trap covers were open or loose. This is a safety hazard as contaminated water or vapors may enter the structure. Recommend evaluation and repair by a qualified plumber.
Photo
Photo 55-1
Building drain has active water movement.
 

56) Some, most, or all of the water supply pipes in this structure are made of galvanized steel. Based on the age of this structure, these pipes may be nearing or may have exceeded their estimated useful life of 40 to 60 years. Internal corrosion and rust can reduce the inside diameter of these pipes over time, resulting in reduced flow and eventually, leaks. The inspector performed a "functional flow test" during the inspection where multiple fixtures were run simultaneously, and found the flow to be adequate. For example, the shower flow didn't decrease substantially when the toilet was flushed. Despite this, and because of their apparent age, these pipes may need replacing at any time.

57) The clothes dryer exhaust duct is broken, disconnected or discharges inside the structure. Clothes dryers produce large amounts of moisture which should not enter structure interiors. Damage to building components, mold, or insect infestation may result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html
Photo
Photo 57-1
Dryer is vented under the home into a crawl space. This promotes mold, insect infestation, and is a fire hazard! This must be corrected.
 

58) Minor Stains were found in one or more sections of drain and/or waste pipes. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future, and if leaks are found, have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair as necessary. Alternatively, the client(s) may wish to have a qualified plumber evaluate now and repair if necessary.

Heating and cooling
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Estimated age: 3-5
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air, Hot water, Steam, Standard efficiency
Primary A/C energy source: Natural Gas
Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts, Flexible ducts
Manufacturer: Carrier
Last service date: June 06

59) Long flexible gas supply connecters to the BBQ are installed where they are subject to damage. For example from use of gardening tools. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or modifications as necessary.

60) The Inspector was unable to locate a remote Boiler Emergency Disconnect Switch. This switch is normally found at the top of the basement stairs. Advise asking the owner as to its location.

61) Evidence of an abandoned buried fuel oil tank is present. It would be advisable to check with the owners to determine if the tank was decommissioned by a licensed company, as many municipalities require documentation. For New York visit, www.dec.state.ny.us/website/der/bulkstor/publications/pr6hmown.html
Photo
Photo 61-1
Vent pipe may indicate old storage tank....
Photo
Photo 61-2
This appears to be an old oil supply line. Evidence perhaps of an underground oil storage tank!

62) No drip leg is installed on the furnace or boiler gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the furnace or boiler components. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 62-1
Gas lines have no "drip-leg"
Photo
Photo 62-2
Gas lines have no "drip-leg"

63) One or more air supply ducts are broken or disconnected. Increased moisture levels in unconditioned spaces and higher energy costs may result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary.
Photo
Photo 63-1
Same area shows disconnected A/C duct! Paying to cool the Attic!!!! Allow rodent entry point. Note also old moisture stains.
 

64) The furnace or boiler flame(s) "roll out" of the combustion chamber. This is a fire hazard due to the possibility of excessive heat damaging heating components, controls and wiring. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 64-1
Burner tube condition corrected during inspection. Note burn area at Red Arrow.
 

65) The filter(s) for the heating/cooling system should be checked monthly and replaced or washed as necessary.

66)   Individual A/C Units did not appear to cool sufficiently when operated for at least 5 minutes.
Photo
Photo 66-1
Office A/C operated but did not achieve acceptable temperature differential when operated for over 5 minutes.
 

67)   Installed Heating system is a Modern boiler System with some desirable features.
Photo
Photo 67-1
Modern Heating Plant is a plus. Gas fired Hot water boiler w/ multiple zones and priority controls.
Photo
Photo 67-2
Gas fire steam boiler.

Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
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Fireplace type: Masonry, Masonry with metal liner
Chimney type: Masonry

68) One or more chimney flues do not have a screened cover installed. Screened covers prevent the following:
  • Fire hazard from wood fire sparks and embers exiting flues
  • Wildlife (birds, rodents, raccoons, etc.) entering flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terra cotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

A qualified chimney service contractor should install screened cover(s) where missing. Screens should have holes 1/4 inch or larger.

69) A wood burning fireplace has been converted to use gas logs, and no glass doors are installed on the fireplace. For gas conversions like this, the fireplace damper is modified so it is permanently open to prevent combustion gases from the pilot light and main burners accumulating in living spaces. Since the damper is always open, unconditioned air from outside can enter living spaces through the chimney, and conditioned air from inside can exit through the chimney. This can result in higher energy costs from heating and cooling. The client(s) should consider having a qualified chimney service contractor install glass doors on the fireplace to reduce or eliminate this air flow.
Photo
Photo 69-1
Living room has Gas Fireplace logs. Pilot was lit but logs were not tested.
 

70) A significant amount of creosote (1/8 inch or more) is visible in the fireplace flue. A qualified chimney service contractor should inspect, clean, and repair if necessary now and annually in the future.

71) Soot deposits were found on the glass in one or more gas fireplaces and/or woodstoves. This may be an indication of incomplete combustion. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as adjusting or repairing the burners and/or nozzles. Also the glass should be cleaned with a gas appliance ceramic glass cleaner. Ammonia-based products, such as common glass cleaners should not be used since they may cause damage or etching to the glass.

72) Minor cracks, pitting and/or deterioration were found in some fireplace firebrick. However the bricks were not loose and appear to be serviceable. The clients should monitor the condition of the firebricks in the fireplace's firebox in the future. If significant deterioration occurs or if bricks become loose, then a qualified chimney service contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
Photo
Photo 72-1
Minor mortar repairs required in some fireplace walls.
 

73) All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
Photo
Photo 73-1
Gas fireplace used with solid fules. Suggest that all flues be cleaned.
 

Crawl space
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Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglas roll or batt Rockwool
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
Vapor barrier present: No

74) Evidence of "light to moderate" rodent infestation was found in one or more areas. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines this as less than 20 feces per square foot. Rodent infestation may be a safety hazard.
Photo
Photo 74-1
Insect / Rodent control systems. Poison!
 

75) No vapor barrier is installed. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should install a vapor barrier. Standard building practices require the following:
  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

  • Better building practices require that:
  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.

76) The crawl space ventilation is substandard, or none exists. This may result in high levels of moisture in the crawl space and can be a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require one square foot of vent area for 150 to 200 square feet of crawl space. Vents should be evenly distributed and within a few feet of corners to promote air circulation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install vents as per standard building practices.

77) Water supply pipes are uninsulated. Recommend insulating pipes as necessary for better energy efficiency and to prevent water pipes from freezing.

78) Some crawl space areas were inaccessible due to low height (less than 18 inches), ductwork or pipes blocking, standing water, and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.

Basement
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Pier or support post material: Bearing wall, Steel
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists

79) Extension cords are being used as permanent wiring in one or more areas. They should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring poses a fire and shock hazard, and is an indication that wiring is inadequate and should be updated. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure, resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, and sparks that could start a fire. Extension cords should be removed as necessary, or a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install additional circuits and/or electric receptacles.

80) Lighting for basement stairs was inadequate. All stairs should be illuminated for safety reasons! Suggest having a fixture installed per local electrical code. Any qualified electrician can perform this installation at a reasonable cost.
Photo
Photo 80-1
Basement stairs have no lighting!
 

81) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
Photo
Photo 81-1
Shock and fire potential.
Photo
Photo 81-2
Shock and fire hazard! Replace cover.

82) One or more electric receptacles are broken or damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. A qualified electrician should replace them as necessary.

83) Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. For example, water stains and/or efflorescence on the foundation or floor, water stains at bases of support posts, etc. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.
Photo
Photo 83-1
Basement family Room / Bar area is still damp!.
Photo
Photo 83-2
Moisture meter shosw "Maximum" off scale reading.
Photo
Photo 83-3
Obvious staining indicates moisture infiltration, will promote mold conditions.
Photo
Photo 83-4
Wood rotted at bottom of basement door

84) Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed in one or more areas so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.

85) The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is damaged and/or deteriorated. Recommend replacing weatherstripping at entry door(s) where necessary.

Kitchen
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86) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
Photo
Photo 86-1
Kitchen does not have GFCI protected outlets. This should be upgraded for safety reasons.
Photo
Photo 86-2
Nice Kitchen with Modern Appliances!

87) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.

Bathrooms
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88) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
Photo
Photo 88-1
Up-grade to GFCI protection in Bathrooms as needed.
Photo
Photo 88-2
GFCI Up-grade suggested.

89) No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection device is visible for the electric supply to the jetted tub. If no GFCI protection exists, then this is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and install GFCI protection if none is installed.
Photo
Photo 89-1
Undesireable placement of Whirlpool bath control!
Note rodent control pad!
 

90) Tile and/or grout in one or more showers is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, deteriorated or missing grout, cracked, missing or loose tiles, etc. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair tile and/or grout as necessary.
Photo
Photo 90-1
Minor grout repairs needed in all baths.
Photo
Photo 90-2
Minor grout repairs needed in all baths.

91) Tile and/or grout around one or more bathtubs is damaged or deteriorated. For example, deteriorated or missing grout, cracked, missing or loose tiles, etc. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair tile and/or grout as necessary.
Photo
Photo 91-1
Typical Grout failure and cracked tiles. Difficult to see in picture.
 

92) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated at one or more bathtubs. For example, where the tub base meets the floor below, where the tub surround meets the tub, and/or around the base of the tub spout. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to wall and floor structures.

93) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated at one or more showers. For example, where the shower base meets the floor below and/or around the shower surround. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to wall and floor structures.

94) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.

95) One or more Windows or Sky Lights show signs of water damage from leaks or condensation.
Photo
Photo 95-1
Water damage around sky lights of of "Her" Bath.
 

96) Miscellaneous Items on Note:
Photo
Photo 96-1
Some minor repairs. Note seperate thermostat for this area!
 

97) One or more sink stopper mechanisms are missing, or need adjustment or repair. Stopper mechanisms should be installed where missing and/or repairs should be made so sink stoppers open and close easily.

98) Recommend cleaning and sealing grout in countertops now and in the future as necessary to prevent staining and to improve waterproofing.

99) Some painted trim elements are being affected by excess moisture.
Photo
Photo 99-1
Paint begining to fail in skylights.
 

Interior Rooms
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100) Two-pronged electric receptacles rather than three-pronged, grounded receptacles are installed in one or more interior rooms. They are considered to be unsafe by today's standards and limit the ability to use appliances that require a ground in these rooms. Examples of appliances that require grounded receptacles include:
  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

This list is not exhaustive. A qualified electrician should evaluate and install grounded receptacles as per the client(s)' needs and standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 100-1
Never cut ground prong off of cords. Up-grade to a 3 prong grounded outlet.
 

101) Incandescent light fixtures in one or more closets are too close to shelves and/or storage areas. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Flammable stored items may come into contact with hot light fixtures, and glass enclosures or lamps may be broken. Standard building practices require incandescent closet light fixtures to have the following clearances:
  • 12 inches from shelves and spaces above shelves
  • 12 inches above the highest closet pole

A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary and as per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 101-1
Open bulbs in closets are a fire hazzard. At mininum convert to flourscent or provide covers! Most have auto jamb switch so this improves safety somewhat.
Photo
Photo 101-2
Open bulbs in closets are a fire hazzard. At mininum convert to flourscent or provide covers! Most have auto jamb switch so this improves safety somewhat.
Photo
Photo 101-3
Open bulbs in closets are a fire hazzard. At mininum convert to flourscent or provide covers! Most have auto jamb switch so this improves safety somewhat.
 

102) One or more electric receptacles are broken or damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. A qualified electrician should replace them as necessary.

103) One or more entry doors have deadbolts installed with no handle, and require a key to open them from both sides. This can be a safety hazard in the event of a fire when the key is not available. The door cannot be used as an exit then, causing entrapment. Key-only deadbolts should be replaced with deadbolts that have a handle on the inside on entry doors in rooms with no other adequate egress nearby.
Photo
Photo 103-1
"Security gates with inside locks can be dangerous in a fire!!
provide easily accessable Key within sight.
 

104) This structure was built prior to 1979 and may contain lead paint. Laws were enacted in 1978 in the US preventing the use of lead paint in residential structures. Lead is a known safety hazard, especially to children but also to adults. The paint found in and around this structure appeared to be intact and may be encapsulated by more recent layers of paint that are not lead-based. Regardless, recommend following precautions as described in the following links to Consumer Products Safety Commission website articles regarding possible lead paint.

What You Should Know About Air Quality in Your Home:

https://www.cpsc.gov/safety-education/safety-guides/home/the-inside-story-a-guide-to-indoor-air-quality

105) One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.
Photo
Photo 105-1
French door do not close or latch smoothly.
Photo
Photo 105-2
Some doors are out of square!
Photo
Photo 105-3
Some doors do not close properly.
 

106) Glass in one or more windows is broken. A qualified contractor should replace glass where necessary.
Photo
Photo 106-1
Some windows are difficult to close and need attention.
Some window panes are cracked.
 

107) The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
Photo
Photo 107-1
Epample of damaged weatherstriping.
 

108) Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

109) One or more areas of interior appear to have been repaired. This may indicate previous damage or water staining.
Photo
Photo 109-1
Ceiling tile replacement may indicate prior water damage.
 

110) Minor cracks were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

Pool House, Barns, Sheds Etc.
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111)  
Photo
Photo 111-1
Siding is in contact with ground or patio materials- will promote siding damage (yellow). Area may have already been repaired. "Z" flashing is missing. (Blue)
Photo
Photo 111-2
Spa was covered and NOT reviewed!
Photo
Photo 111-3
Low mounted wiring (power, TV, Phone) may be affected by heavy snows promoting poor signals from corrosion. (Easily protected with cover sheet.
Photo
Photo 111-4
Marine grade electric panel is a nice feature.
Photo
Photo 111-5
Gazebo and changing facility is comfortabe and attractive.
Sun canopy is moldy.
Photo
Photo 111-6
Pool and spa equipment are relatively new and appear to be operating.
Photo
Photo 111-7
Diving board and patio area are in servisable condition.
Photo
Photo 111-8
Again, Soil is in close proximity to siding materials.
Photo
Photo 111-9
Drywall areas need minor repairs.
Photo
Photo 111-10
Drywall areas need minor repairs.
Photo
Photo 111-11
Minor movement in Pool Coping.
 

Additional Photos and Information
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112) Lightning Protection System is present and considered desirable. No evaluation is made as to effectiveness.
Photo
Photo 112-1
Lightning Protection System. Enhances Fire safety and is welcomed by Insurers!
Photo
Photo 112-2
Lightning Protection! A good feature!

Structural Pest Findings
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Limitations: This report only includes findings from accessible and visible areas on the day of the inspection. In addition to the inaccessible areas documented in this report, examples of other inaccessible areas include: sub areas less than 18 inches in height; attic areas less than five feet in height, areas blocked by ducts, pipes or insulation; areas where locks or permanently attached covers prevent access; areas where insulation would be damaged if traversed; areas obscured by vegetation. All inaccessible areas are subject to infestation or damage from wood destroying organisms. The inspector does not move furnishings, stored items, debris, floor or wall coverings, insulation, or other materials as part of the inspection, nor perform destructive testing. Wood destroying organisms may infest, reinfest or become active at anytime. No warranty is provided as part of this inspection.
Visible evidence of active wood destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of active wood decay fungi: No
Visible evidence of past wood destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of past wood decay fungi: No
Visible evidence of damage by wood destroying insects: No
Visible evidence of damage by wood decay fungi: No
Visible evidence of conditions conducive to wood destroying organisms: Yes, Vegetation, Soil and /or moisture conditions around the structure.


National Association of Certified Home InspectorsNational Radon Safety Board
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