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C.R. Westbrook Home Inspections

Website: http://westbrookinspections.com
Email: crwestbrookinspections@gmail.com
Phone: (360) 319-4153
Inspector's phone: (360) 319-4153
3129 Birchwood Ave 
Bellingham WA 98225-1455
Inspector: Cameron Westbrook
WSLHI#1519
InterNACHI Member Number: NACHI15120722

 

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  Joe and Jane Jones
Property address:  123 Anytown Lane
Inspection date:  Friday, January 01, 2016

This report published on Monday, June 27, 2016 4:01:05 PM PDT

Thank you for choosing CR Westbrook Inspections LLC for your home inspection. In order to educate you, the client on what a home inspection is and is not I recommend reading the following.

A home inspection is a visual, and not an exhaustive or invasive inspection of a home by a trained, licensed and impartial inspector. This report is prepared from an inspection conducted by a Washington State licensed home inspector in accordance with the state standards of practice for home inspection http://apps.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=308-408C . Opinions contained in the report are based on conditions visible and evident at the time of the inspection. This report does not warrant, represent, or guarantee that the structure reported on is free from evidence of WDO's, their damage, or conditions conducive to WDO's, nor does it represent or guarantee that the total damage, infestation, or infection is limited to that disclosed in this report

Home inspections are limited by the time lines of real estate transactions and practicality. It is not a technically exhaustive inspection. An inspector is looking for significant issues and concerns as dictated by the WA SOP. Any information beyond what is required is provided as a courtesy. Some recommendations made in the report are for enhancements that are optional and not mandatory. This report has no enforcement and is for informational purposes to help a home buyer make a more informed decision.
The inspector cannot see through or into walls, siding or wallpaper, concrete or floors, insulation, carpets, ceilings, under roofing materials, down into soil, tight-lines, drains, vent or waste pipes, toilet/floor/sink connections, ducting, gutters or downspouts full of debris or behind creosote or soot. Areas that are not accessible or the view is obscured as a result of furniture, appliances, storage or other belongings and coverings are excluded. Overflows at sinks and tubs are not tested -- doing so could cause water damage inside wall cavities. A home inspector doesn't guarantee that a roof will withstand a heavy windstorm nor ascertain that it has not leaked in the past nor that it will not leak at some time in the future. In a related matter, gutters may not withstand heavy snowfall or compacted ice. Roofing defects may be concealed by the roof covering. Solar roofing systems, including any components on the roof or in an attic, are excluded.

Procedures: Only normal controls will be operated (thermostats, light switches, faucets, etc). Wood stoves, fireplaces and pilot lights will not be lit. Devices that are not functional will not be plugged-in, nor will circuit breakers, or main shut-off valves be operated. Furniture, storage and appliances will not be moved or dis-assembled during the home inspection -- with the exception of (1) the "dead front" cover will usually be removed from the electric panel; (2) front panels may be removed at some HVAC appliances. Care is taken in removing fronts or covers, from electric panels or openings into attics, but sometimes the procedures can, unavoidably, leave minor cosmetic marks on finished surfaces.

A home inspector makes every effort to perform a thorough inspection, within a reasonable time line and other limitations noted. It is impossible for a home inspector to see every possible defect or evaluate every component. Some defects may be concealed by building components, furniture or stored items. Other problems may be intermittent and not present at the time of the inspection. The standards of practice for home inspection state that the inspector shall view, operate or test a representative number of components at the exterior and the interior: readily accessible siding and trim, windows, doors, walls, light switches, receptacles, etc. An inspector does not get on furniture to view or operate windows or other components. High exterior locations at the home, such as siding, trim or soffit areas below eaves, due to safety and typical access issues, may be viewed from the ground and not from a ladder. High electrical receptacles, under eaves, may not be evaluated. Complex mechanical devices, such as freezer icemakers or fresh water systems are excluded. Washing machines and dryers are excluded. Sewage related septic/private disposal systems including septic tanks, sewage grinders/ejector pumps are usually fully or partially concealed from view or below grade and the components and mechanisms are not opened or inspected for performance or function. The exclusion includes air pumps, ultraviolet systems and all related electronics, alarms and wiring. Remote electric distribution (sub) panels may be concealed from view and may not be apparent to the inspector. If such systems are known to be present, or are later found to be on premises, recommend that the tanks, pumps/grinders, panels and related components be, as required, further evaluated/serviced by qualified professionals.

When referenced- "qualified" I refer to a licensed, state certified (where applicable) and insured contractor or tradesman with a reasonable amount of experience. Qualified professional (contractors) conducting the repairs should provide written documentation in the form of a third party agreement, work order, or detailed invoice and preferably a warranty on their work. Additionally, I recommended that all qualified parties or specialists, when on-site, be asked to not only make essential repairs but to also further evaluate a system or component and to make recommendations as to other beneficial repairs, improvements or upgrades. A home inspector is a generalist and a licensed professional in a given trade will have the expertise and experience to fully evaluate the systems associated with their trade.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information
Concern typeDamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.)
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
Grounds
Exterior and Foundation
Roof
Attic and Roof Structure
Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
Electric
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Garage or Carport
Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
Water Heater
Kitchen
Interior, Doors and Windows
Crawl Space
General Information


Grounds
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Limitations: Unless specifically included in the inspection, the following items and any related equipment, controls, electric systems and/or plumbing systems are excluded from this inspection: detached buildings or structures; fences and gates; retaining walls; underground drainage systems, catch basins or concealed sump pumps; swimming pools and related safety equipment, spas, hot tubs or saunas; whether deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight; trees, landscaping, properties of soil, soil stability, erosion and erosion control; ponds, water features, irrigation or yard sprinkler systems; sport courts, playground, recreation or leisure equipment; areas below the exterior structures with less than 3 feet of vertical clearance; invisible fencing; sea walls, docks and boathouses; retractable awnings. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only.
Site profile: Minor slope
Condition of driveway: Appeared serviceable
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Condition of sidewalks and/or patios: Appeared serviceable
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Condition of deck, patio and/or porch covers: Appeared serviceable
Deck, patio, porch cover material and type: Covered (Refer to Roof section)
Condition of decks, porches and/or balconies: Appeared serviceable
Deck, porch and/or balcony material: Concrete, Masonry
Condition of stairs, handrails and guardrails: Appeared serviceable
Exterior stair material: Masonry

1) At the back of the home there is an exposed white plastic tube about 10" in diameter, covered only by a loose piece of wood. This is a falling hazard for pets and small children. Recommend conversation with home owner to determine purpose of pipe and the, cover the opening as appropriate by qualified party.
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2) Conducive conditions Wood posts supporting patio roof at rear of home are inserted into stone veneer. The caulking in this area has failed. Caulking in all areas of a home is a normal maintenance item and should be evaluated and repaired or replaced as necessary. This is a conducive condition as water may enter this gap and could lead to rot of the posts. Recommend removal and replacement of caulking in the affected areas.
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3) This property was accessed by a driveway or private road shared with nearby properties. Shared driveways or private roads are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to them are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a evaluation by a specialist if repairs are needed. Recommend that the client review the recorded agreements regarding the driveway, the deeds of the property owners involved, and easements permitting access to, use of, and maintenance of the driveway.

4) Minor cracks were found in the driveway, but no trip hazards were found. The client may wish to have repairs made for cosmetic reasons.
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Exterior and Foundation
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Limitations: The inspector performs a visual inspection of accessible components or systems at the exterior. Items excluded from this inspection include below-grade foundation walls and footings; foundations, exterior surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris; wall structures obscured by coverings such as siding or trim. Some items such as siding, trim, soffits, vents and windows are often high off the ground, and may be viewed using binoculars from the ground or from a ladder. This may limit a full evaluation. Regarding foundations, some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of seismic reinforcement.
Wall inspection method: Viewed from ground, from a ladder
Condition of wall exterior covering: Appeared serviceable
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Cement fiber, Stone or faux stone veneer
Condition of foundation and footings: Appeared serviceable
Apparent foundation type: Crawl space, Concrete garage slab
Foundation/stem wall material: Poured in place concrete
Footing material (under foundation stem wall): Poured in place concrete

5) Conducive conditions Soil was in contact with or less than 6 inches from siding and trim at the SW corner of the home. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend grading or removing soil as necessary to maintain a 6-inch clearance. If not possible, then recommend replacing untreated wood with pressure-treated wood. Installation of borate-based products such as Impel rods can also reduce the likelihood of rot or infestation if soil cannot be removed. Note that damage from fungal rot and/or insects may be found when soil is removed, and repairs may be necessary.
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6) Gaps were found in siding at penetrations into the garage in the SW corner. Vermin, insects or water may enter the structure. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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7) Conducive conditions Soil was in contact with or less than 4 inches from stone or stone veneer at the NE corner of the home. For most residential installations of this type of veneer, this is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Weep holes may be covered. Condensed water behind the veneer may not be able to escape, and moisture can accumulate in the wood structure behind. Recommend grading and/or removing soil as necessary to maintain a 4-inch clearance.
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8) Ants were present at the SE and SW portions of the house on the patio. They have moved sand into the area. At minimum they can be a nuisance, at worst may possibly cause damage. Recommend contacting licensed pest management professional to evaluate and treat.
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9)   Small area of damage to the siding at SE corner of the home. It has been painted, and should be monitored. Any damage to siding that breaks the paint layer can allow water intrusion and the possibility for wider damage.
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10)   Wasp or yellow jacket nests were prevalent under eaves and other areas of the building exterior. These can be a safety issue for accessing or maintaining the home and especially for those who have allergies. Recommend contacting licensed pest management professional to remove.
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Roof
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Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; solar roofing components. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on the roof surface material, nor guarantee that leaks have not occurred in the roof surface, skylights or roof penetrations in the past. Regarding roof leaks, only active leaks, visible evidence of possible sources of leaks, and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that leaks will not occur in the future. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. Occupants should monitor the condition of roofing materials in the future. For older roofs, recommend that a professional inspect the roof surface, flashings, appurtenances, etc. annually and maintain/repair as might be required. If needed, the roofer should enter attic space(s). Regarding the roof drainage system, unless the inspection was conducted during and after prolonged periods of heavy rain, the inspector was unable to determine if gutters, downspouts and extensions perform adequately or are leak-free.
Roof inspection method: Traversed
Condition of roof surface material: Appeared serviceable
Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Roof type: Gable
Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: One
Condition of exposed flashings: Appeared serviceable
Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)

11) Conducive conditions Roof did not have drip edge flashing installed. Better building practices use drip edge flashing to avoid leaks and damage to roof sheathing. At minimum monitor performance of current system. Recommend that a qualified person install drip edge flashing.

for more information view: http://inspectapedia.com/roof/Roof_Drip_Edge_Flashing_Specifications.php
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12) Downspout bracket on SE corner is loose. Unsecured downspouts can come loose and allow water to contact siding or pool near foundation. Recommend repair by qualified party.
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13) DamageConducive conditions Small amount of water damage was found at in the roof sheathing above the garage. This was most likely caused by over flowing gutters. To prevent further damage recommend cleaning and maintaining gutters by qualified party to avoid overflow.
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Evidence of high water levels in gutter.

14) Conducive conditions Significant amounts of debris have accumulated in most gutters. Downspout screens have been installed. This will keep debris from entering the below grade downspout drain. These are recommended in order to keep hidden drains from clogging. However they do require more frequent maintenance. Gutters that are not maintained can overflow and cause water to come in contact with the building exterior, or water can accumulate around the foundation. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend cleaning gutters and downspouts now and as necessary in the future.
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Debris accumulated around downspout screen.
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15) On the S side of the home it appears that below grade downspout drains were installed and then downspout location changed. Recommend contacting home owner to ascertain purpose of these drainage pipes. If no practical purpose advise capping or removal by qualified party.
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SE Corner
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By SW living room/dining room corner
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Rear entrance to garage
 

16)   Bird nest found on roof. This can hold and trap water against the roofing material and siding and is a conducive condition. Recommend removal of any debris on roof by qualified party.
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Attic and Roof Structure
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Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of the attic ventilation system. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high/low temperatures, high/low humidity, high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector is not a licensed engineer and does not determine the adequacy of roof structure components such as trusses, rafters or ceiling beams, or their spacing or sizing.
Attic inspection method: Viewed from hatch, Traversing attic without disturbing blown in insulation or causing potential damage to ceilings below was not possible. Free access was blocked by various roof structure.
Condition of roof structure: Appeared serviceable
Roof structure type: Trusses
Ceiling structure: Trusses
Condition of insulation in attic (ceiling, skylight chase, etc.): Appeared serviceable
Ceiling insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
Approximate attic insulation R value (may vary in areas): R-38, View of installed ruler indicates at least 14" of blown in fiberglass insulation
Vapor retarder: Not determined (inaccessible or obscured)
Condition of roof ventilation: Appeared serviceable
Roof ventilation type: Ridge vent(s), Box vents (roof jacks), Enclosed soffit vents

17) Attic Hatch in Garage is framed between two trusses and completed with pieces of bird blocking. The end pieces are not securely fastened to the trusses and should not have weight put on them (For instance when crawling up into the attic) as there is a risk of damage not only to the ceiling but a potential fall hazard as well. At minimum be aware of this when entering attic. Recommend qualified party repair so attic can be accessed safely.
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18) Cardboard baffles that are intended to keep insulation from blocking soffit vents in the attic area above the garage were loose and had fallen down. Attic and/or roof structure ventilation can be reduced as a result. Other areas of the home were not visible and the condition of the baffles could not be determined. The service life for the roof surface materials can also be reduced because of high temperatures. Moisture from condensation is also likely to accumulate in the roof structure and/or attic and can be a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair or reattach baffles as necessary.
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Attic/Roof structure prevented traversing of the attic and ability to evaluate areas other than immediately around the garage.

Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.
Location #A: Half bath, first floor, east
Location #B: 3/4 bath, first floor, south
Location #C: Master bath, first floor, west
Location #D: Laundry room/area, north
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cabinets:
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of toilets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of bathtubs and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of shower(s) and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of ventilation systems: Appeared serviceable
Bathroom and laundry ventilation type: Windows, Spot exhaust fans
Gas supply for laundry equipment present: Yes

19) Conducive conditions The clothes dryer exhaust duct terminated in the crawl space vent well. Clothes dryers produce large amounts of warm moist air which should not enter structure interiors. Increased heat and moisture in the crawl space is a conducive condition. Recommend that a qualified person install, repair or replace the duct as necessary so it terminates outdoors per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?DRYER
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Dryer duct terminating in vent well on west side of home.
 

20) Conducive conditions No caulking was found between the shower enclosure and the walls at the 3/4 bath between the two guest bedrooms. Water can penetrate these areas and cause damage. Recommend that a qualified person install caulking as necessary.
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21) Normal deterioration of grout at Master bedroom counter/backsplash was present. Grout and caulking are normal maintenance items and should be evaluated, sealed, repaired or replaced as needed. Recommend repair, cleaning and sealing the grout by qualified party.

22) Laundry supply hoses are made of rubber. These are not very durable and subject to bursting and flooding when aged. Recommend replacement with braided stainless steel hoses.

Electric
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, transfer switches, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low-voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific or anticipated needs, or if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, and does not install or change light bulbs. The inspector does not evaluate every wall switch or receptacle, but instead tests a representative number of them per various standards of practice. When furnishings, stored items or child-protective caps are present some receptacles are usually inaccessible and are not tested; these are excluded from this inspection. Receptacles that are not of standard 110 volt configuration, including 240-volt dryer receptacles, are not tested and are excluded. The functionality of, power source for and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms is not determined as part of this inspection. Upon taking occupancy, proper operating and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms should be verified and batteries should be changed. These devices have a limited lifespan and should be replaced every 10 years. The inspector attempts to locate and evaluate all main and sub-panels. However, panels are often concealed. If panels are found after the inspection, a qualified electrician should evaluate and repair if necessary. The inspector attempts to determine the overall electrical service size, but such estimates are not guaranteed because the overall capacity may be diminished by lesser-rated components in the system. Any repairs recommended should be made by a licensed electrician.
Electric service condition: Appeared serviceable
Primary service type: Underground
Number of service conductors: 3
Service voltage (volts): 120-240
Estimated service amperage: 200
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service entrance conductor material: Stranded copper
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
System ground: Not determined, not readily apparent, Unable to locate grounding wire and rod on exterior. Recommend contacting owner for more information.
Condition of main service panel: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sub-panel(s): Appeared serviceable
Location of main service panel #A: Garage, North West Wall
Location of main service panel #B: Garage, For Vault and Well
Location of sub-panel #C: Building exterior, West Wall, shut off for Heat Pump. Not evaluated. Breakers present
Location of sub-panel #D: Building exterior, South West corner, 50 Amp Breakers present. labeled "Hot Tub" not evaluated
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Condition of branch circuit wiring: Serviceable
Branch circuit wiring type: Copper
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: None visible
Ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection present: Yes
Arc fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) protection present: Yes
Smoke alarms installed: Yes, but not tested
Carbon monoxide alarms installed: No, recommend install

23) Electric receptacles at the kitchen, family room, dining room, living room, parlor and/or laundry area had no visible arc fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) protection, or the inspector was unable to determine if AFCI protection was present. This is a potential safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and install AFCI protection if necessary and per standard building practices. General guidelines for AFCI-protected receptacles include the following locations:
  • Bedrooms (since 1999)
  • Kitchens, laundry areas, family rooms, dining rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens and recreation rooms, sunrooms, closets and hallways (since 2014)
For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?AFCI

24) Non-metallic sheathed wiring in the attic was routed on surfaces within 6 feet of one or more access hatches or doors, and was subject to damage. Wiring can be damaged when hatches are lifted and set aside, when stored items are moved into or out of the attic, etc. This is a potential shock and/or fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices.
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25) Hot Tub Sub Panel D had wasp nest inside door. Recommend qualified party remove to allow safe access.
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26) No carbon monoxide alarms were visible. It is possible that the smoke alarms are combination units, but the inspector could not verify. This is a potential safety hazard. Some states and/or municipalities require CO alarms to be installed for new construction and/or for homes being sold. Recommend installing approved CO alarms outside of each separate sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms on each level and in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?COALRM

27) Loose yellow wire hanging at back of patio was not energized and was consistent with other wire used for outdoor sound system. Recommend completion of sound system installation or removal or wire.

28)   Low voltage wire ( cable et. al.) hanging loose at corner of garage. Less than professional termination of wires, recommend installation of protective box by qualified party.
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Plumbing / Fuel Systems
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: private/shared wells and related equipment; private sewage disposal systems; hot tubs or spas; main, side and lateral sewer lines; gray water systems; pressure boosting systems; trap primers; incinerating or composting toilets; fire suppression systems; water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems; plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks; backflow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determine the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks.
Condition of service and main line: Appeared serviceable
Water service: Private well
Water pressure (psi): 63
Location of main water shut-off: Garage, Base of Pressure tank South Wall
Condition of supply lines: Appeared serviceable
Supply pipe material: PEX plastic, Not determined (inaccessible or obscured), Pipe entering garage fromwell was not long enough to determine if CPVC or PVC. However CPVC is most often used for hot water applications.
Condition of drain pipes: Appeared serviceable
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Condition of waste lines: Appeared serviceable
Waste pipe material: Plastic
Vent pipe condition: Appeared serviceable
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Condition of fuel system: Appeared serviceable
Visible fuel storage systems: Below ground, propane tank
Location of main fuel shut-off valve: At propane tank, West Side of building and individual shut offs before water heater and furnace.

29) Decreased flow in the Master Bathroom was noted when both shower and bathtub taps were open. No discernible drop in pressure was noted when a single fixture was in operation in conjunction with sink or toilet.

30) No sediment trap was installed in the gas supply line at the furnace and/or water heater. Sediment traps prevent damage to gas-fired appliances by trapping oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris. Recommend that a qualified contractor install a sediment trap per standard building practices.

For more information: http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/icod/irc/2012/icod_irc_2012_24_sec017.htm?bu2=undefined

31) Based on visible equipment or information provided to the inspector, the water supply to this property appeared to be from a private well. Private well water supplies are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to this system are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. The inspector does not test private well water for contamination or pollutants, determine if the supply and/or flow are adequate, or provide an estimate for remaining life of well pumps, pressure tanks or equipment. Only visible and accessible components are evaluated. Recommend the following:
  • That a qualified well contractor fully evaluate the well, including a pump/flow test
  • That the well water be tested per the client's concerns (coliforms, pH, contaminants, etc.)
  • Research the well's history (how/when constructed, how/when maintained or repaired, past performance, past health issues)
  • Document the current well capacity and water quality for future reference
For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?WELL

32) A water softener system was installed on the premises. These are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to this system are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. Water softeners typically work by removing unwanted minerals (e.g. calcium, magnesium) from the water supply. They prevent build-up of scale inside water supply pipes, improve lathering while washing, and prevent spots on dishes. Recommend consulting with the property owner about this system to determine its condition, required maintenance, age, expected remaining life, etc. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?WTRSFT
http://www.reporthost.com/?HRDWTR

Garage or Carport
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Limitations: The inspector does not determine the adequacy of firewall ratings. Requirements for ventilation in garages vary between municipalities.
Type: Attached
Condition of door between garage and house: Appeared serviceable
Type of door between garage and house: Wood, With visible fire-resistance rating
Condition of garage vehicle door(s): Appeared serviceable
Type of garage vehicle door: Sectional
Number of vehicle doors: 3
Condition of automatic opener(s): Appeared serviceable
Mechanical auto-reverse operable (reverses when meeting reasonable resistance during closing): Yes
Condition of garage floor: Appeared serviceable
Condition of garage interior: Appeared serviceable
Garage ventilation: Adequate

33) Appliances such as the water heater and furnace while located at the rear of the garage were subject to damage from vehicles because no protective barrier was installed in front of them. This is a potential safety hazard for fire and/or shock. A qualified contractor should install a barrier per standard building practices. For example, a steel post or specially made wood partition anchored in the concrete slab floor.
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Photo 33-1
Recommend installation of bollard in front of water heater and furnace.
 

34) Gaps were found in the attached garage ceiling where water heater and furnace supply and venting penetrate. Current standard building practices call for wooden-framed ceilings and walls that divide the house and garage to provide limited fire-resistance rating to prevent the spread of fire from the garage to the house. Recommend that a qualified person repair per standard building practices. For example, by patching openings or holes, firestopping holes or gaps with fire-resistant caulking, and/or installing fire-resistant wall covering (e.g. Type X drywall). For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?AGFR
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35) Minor cracks were found in the concrete slab floor. These are common and appeared to be only a cosmetic issue.
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Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; solar, coal or wood-fired heat systems; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating or cooling system components, does not determine if heating or cooling systems are appropriately sized, does not test coolant pressure, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, a shut-off valve to be operated, a circuit breaker to be turned "on" or a serviceman's or oil emergency switch to be operated. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks. Condensation pans and drain lines may clog or leak at any time and should be monitored while in operation in the future. Where buildings contain furnishings or stored items, the inspector may not be able to verify that a heat source is present in all "liveable" rooms (e.g. bedrooms, kitchens and living/dining rooms).
General heating system type(s): Forced air, Furnace, Heat pump, Wood-burning fireplace or stove
General heating distribution type(s): Ducts and registers
Last service date of primary heat source:
Condition of forced air heating/(cooling) system: Appeared serviceable
Forced air heating system fuel type: Propane
Estimated age of forced air furnace: 2012 from S/N Assumed use upon home construction 2014
Location of forced air furnace: Garage, Lennox EL 195DFE High Efficiency Gas Furnace
Forced air system capacity in BTUs or kilowatts: 106,000 BTUH
Location for forced air filter(s): At top of air handler
Condition of forced air ducts and registers: Appeared serviceable
Type of combustion air supply: Intake duct
Condition of venting system: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cooling system and/or heat pump: Appeared serviceable
Cooling system and/or heat pump fuel type: Propane
Location: West side of home
Type: Heat pump, Lennox Heat Pump M/N 14HPX-042-230-17
Condition of controls: Appeared serviceable, Thermostat Located on wall between kitchen and hallway to master bedroom

36) A support strap for flex ducts used for heating or cooling were broken or loose in the NE corner of the crawl space.. This may result in reduced energy efficiency due to restricted flow. Recommend that a qualified person repair support straps as necessary.
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Photo 36-1
 

37) The gas forced air furnace appeared to have been serviced within the last year based on information found on labeling on the equipment. If this is true, then routine servicing is not needed at this point. However a qualified HVAC contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary annually in the future. For more information visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ANFURINSP

Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: coal stoves, gas logs, chimney flues (except where visible). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of drafting or sizing in fireplace and stove flues, and also does not determine if prefabricated or zero-clearance fireplaces are installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. The inspector does not perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, and does not light fires. The inspector provides a basic visual examination of a chimney and any associated wood burning device. The National Fire Protection Association has stated that an in-depth Level 2 chimney inspection should be part of every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Such an inspection may reveal defects that are not apparent to the home inspector who is a generalist.
Condition of wood-burning fireplaces, stoves: Appeared serviceable
Wood-burning stove type: Freestanding, Napolean EPA 1100 S/N 045673
Condition of chimneys and flues: Appeared serviceable, Not determined, Unable to verify clearances in attic due to limitations in traversing the space.
Wood-burning chimney type: Metal

38) A wood-burning stove is present in the family room. When such devices are used, they should be professionally inspected and cleaned annually to prevent creosote build-up and to determine if repairs are needed. The National Fire Protection Association states that a "Level 2" chimney inspection should be performed with every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Recommend consulting with the property owner about recent and past servicing and repairs to all wood-burning devices and chimneys or flues at this property. Recommend that a qualified specialist evaluate all wood-burning devices and chimneys, and clean and repair as necessary. Note that if a wood stove insert is installed, it may need to be removed for such an evaluation. For more information, search for "chimney inspection" at:
http://www.reporthost.com/?CSIA

Water Heater
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Limitations: Evaluation of and determining the adequacy or completeness of the following items are not included in this inspection: water recirculation pumps; solar water heating systems; Energy Smart or energy saver controls; catch pan drains. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on water heaters, does not determine if water heaters are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit or a shut-off valve to be operated.
Condition of water heater: Appeared serviceable
Type: Tankless, Navien NPE 240-A S/N: 7414C1520371883
Energy source: Propane
Estimated age: 2015
Capacity (in gallons): Not applicable, Recovery Rating 301 Gal. per Hour
Temperature-pressure relief valve installed: Yes
Location of water heater: Garage
Hot water temperature tested: Yes
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 123F
Condition of venting system: Appeared serviceable

Kitchen
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: household appliances such as stoves, ovens, cook tops, ranges, warming ovens, griddles, broilers, dishwashers, trash compactors, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers, hot water dispensers and water filters; appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self and/or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances. The inspector does not note appliance manufacturers, models or serial numbers and does not determine if appliances are subject to recalls. Areas and components behind and obscured by appliances are inaccessible and excluded from this inspection.
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of under-sink food disposal: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of dishwasher: Appeared serviceable
Condition of range, cooktop or oven: Appeared serviceable
Range, cooktop or oven type: Propane
Type of ventilation: Hood or built into microwave over range or cooktop
Condition of refrigerator: Appeared serviceable
Condition of built-in microwave oven: Appeared serviceable

39) Electrical wiring for the under-sink food disposal was damaged, insulation has pulled away from wires. The wiring can be damaged by repeated bending or contact with sharp objects. BX-armored conduit should be installed to protect wiring, or a flexible appliance cable should be installed. This is a potential shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices.
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Photo 39-1
 

40) Recommend cleaning and sealing the grout at the back splash behind the kitchen sink now and in the future as necessary to prevent staining and to improve waterproofing.
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Photo 40-1
 

Interior, Doors and Windows
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems; communications wiring; central vacuum systems; elevators and stair lifts; cosmetic deficiencies such as nail-pops, scuff marks, dents, dings, blemishes or issues due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment; deficiencies relating to interior decorating; low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window, drawer, cabinet door or closet door operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Determining the cause and/or source of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.
Condition of exterior entry doors: Appeared serviceable
Exterior door material: Wood, Fiberglass or vinyl
Condition of interior doors: Appeared serviceable
Condition of windows and skylights: Appeared serviceable
Type(s) of windows: Vinyl, Multi-pane, Sliding, Single-hung, Fixed
Condition of walls and ceilings: Appeared serviceable
Wall type or covering: Drywall
Ceiling type or covering: Drywall
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Flooring type or covering: Carpet, Vinyl, linoleum or marmoleum, Laminate, Tile

41) The inspector was unable to verify that the glass used in the pantry door in the kitchen was approved safety glass. Glazing that is not approved safety glass, located in areas subject to human impact, is a safety hazard. Standard building practices generally require that approved safety glass be used in swinging and sliding doors except where "art glass," jalousie windows or glazing smaller than a 3-inch opening is used. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate further to determine if glazing is approved safety glass, and replace glass if necessary, and per standard building practices.
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Photo 41-1
 

42) The inspector was unable to verify that the glass used in the windows in the living room were approved safety glass. As noted below, the requirements for safety glass can be a bit complicated. When children are present it is this inspectors recommendation that any glass closer the floor than 18" and subject to impact be approved safety glass or have the below mentioned safety bar installed. Window glazing that is not approved safety glass, located in areas subject to human impact, is a safety hazard. Standard building practices generally require that approved safety glass be used in but not limited to the following conditions:
  • Windows with a pane larger than 9 square feet, with a bottom edge closer than 18 inches to the floor and a top edge higher than 36 inches above the floor and within 36 inches, horizontally, of a walking surface
  • Windows that are both within a 24-inch arc of a door and within 60 inches of the floor
  • Glazing in walls enclosing stairway landings or within 5 feet of the bottom and top of stairways, where the bottom edge of the glass is less than 60 inches above the floor
Note that "art glass" (leaded, faceted, carved or decorative) may be an acceptable alternative for safety glass due to its visibility. Also, a 1 1/2-inch-wide protective bar on the accessible side of the glass, placed 34-38 inches above the floor, can serve as an acceptable substitute for safety glass. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate further to determine if glazing is approved safety glass, and replace glass if necessary, and per standard building practices.
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Photo 42-1
 

43) No window screens were installed. Windows may not provide ventilation during months when insects are active. Screens were stored in garage. Recommend cleaning and installing before using windows for ventilation.
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Photo 43-1
 

44) Door stops were missing at the entry door and the 4th bedroom (currently used as an office). This can allow damage to both walls and doors. Recommend qualified party install doorstops.
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Photo 44-1
 

Crawl Space
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Limitations: Structural components such as joists and beams, and other components such as piping, wiring and/or ducting that are obscured by under-floor insulation are excluded from this inspection. The inspector does not determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.

The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that water will not accumulate in the crawl spaces in the future. Complete access to all crawl space areas during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. heavy rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so.

The inspector attempts to locate all crawl space access points and areas. Access points may be obscured or otherwise hidden by furnishings or stored items. In such cases, the client should ask the property owner where all access points are that are not described in this inspection, and have those areas inspected. Note that crawl space areas should be checked at least annually for water intrusion, plumbing leaks and pest activity.
Crawl space inspection method: Traversed
Condition of floor substructure above: Not determined (inaccessible or obscured), Obscured by insulation
Pier or support post material: Wood
Beam material: Solid wood
Floor structure above: Engineered wood joists
Condition of insulation underneath floor above: Appeared serviceable
Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
Condition of vapor barrier: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Vapor barrier present: Yes
Condition of crawl space ventilation: Appeared serviceable
Ventilation type: Unconditioned space, with vents

45) Evidence of rodent presence was found in the form of urine stains and/or damaged insulation in the crawl space. Consult with the property owner about this. A qualified person should make repairs to seal openings in the structure, set traps, and clean rodent waste as necessary. Recommend following guidelines in these Center for Disease Control articles:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SEALUP
http://www.reporthost.com/?TRAPUP
http://www.reporthost.com/?CLEANUP

46) Conducive conditions The vapor barrier in some areas of the crawl space was loose or askew. Soil was exposed as a result and will allow water from the soil to evaporate up into the structure. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. A 6 mil black plastic sheet should be placed over all exposed soil with seams overlapped to 24 inches, 6" up the foundation wall and not in contact with any wood structural components. The sheeting should be held in place with bricks or stones, not wood. Recommend that a qualified person replace or repair the vapor barrier where necessary and per standard building practices.

47) Under-floor insulation was damaged in some areas. This may result in reduced energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace insulation as necessary.

48) Conducive conditions Cellulose material such as scrap wood and/or cardboard or paper was found in the crawl space. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend removing all cellulose-based debris or stored items.
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Photo 48-2

49) All the crawl space vents were intentionally blocked with rigid foam. This restricts ventilation in the crawl space and can result in increased levels of moisture inside. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Such vents should be left open at all times except during severe freezing weather. Recommend removing materials or items blocking vents as necessary.
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Photo 49-1
 

50)   Clothes dryer ducting is routed through the crawl space and is not insulated. Heating of the crawl space allows the air to carry more moisture and is a conducive condition. Depending on temperature differentials condensation may also form. Recommend insulating pipe per standard building practices.
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Photo 50-1
 

General Information
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Time started: 1230
Time finished: 5:00 pm
Present during inspection: Realtor
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: No
Weather conditions during inspection: Dry (no rain), Sunny
Temperature during inspection: Warm, 70F
Inspection fee: $425
Type of building: Single family
Buildings inspected: One house
Number of residential units inspected: 1
Age of main building: 2014
Source for main building age: Municipal records or property listing
Front of building faces: North
Main entrance faces: North
Occupied: Yes

51) Evidence of rodent presence was found in the form of urine stains and/or damaged insulation in the crawl space. Consult with the property owner about this. A qualified person should make repairs to seal openings in the structure, set traps, and clean rodent waste as necessary. Recommend following guidelines in these Center for Disease Control articles:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SEALUP
http://www.reporthost.com/?TRAPUP
http://www.reporthost.com/?CLEANUP

The following is a general maintenance guide for homeowners, some tips may not be relevant to your home. Recommend a common sense approach to this list and overall home maintenance.

Monthly:


1. Vacuum and clean all return air ducts/grills.
2. Purge garbage disposal by first filling kitchen sink with clean water, then turn on food disposer until water is drained through.
3. Change/clean air conditioning return filters monthly. This will help keep your air cleaner and system running more efficiently. Clogged air filters will make your system operate longer than required, thereby increasing your monthly bills.
4. Wash refrigerator/freezer interior walls and door liner with solution of 1-quart warm water: 2 tablespoons of baking soda and wipe dry.
5. Clean dishwasher filter (if provided), usually at lower spray arm, and wipe door gasket clean with a damp cloth.
6. Inspect lighting fixtures and replace blown light bulbs.
7. Clean clothes drier lint traps and or ducts to reduce fire risk.
8. Clean toaster oven crumb tray.

Quarterly:

1.Inspect exterior doors to ensure they are weather tight. Adjust or replace weather stripping as needed.
2. Service doors (incl. garage doors) and drawers, clean and lubricate latches, hinges and guides.
3. Inspect and repair exterior caulking around windows, doors, and siding.
4. Replace/clean central heating system (furnace) filters.
5. Re-tighten knobs on kitchen cabinets, don't overtighten.

Semi-Annually:

1. Have heating and air-conditioning systems inspected and serviced by licensed contractor.
2. Inspect and test smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors and replace back up batteries.
3. Check (GFCI) ground fault interrupted circuits.
4. Inspect and maintain proper drainage around home. Clean gutters and down-pipes and ensure water is flowing away from your home.
5. Inspect home for rodent droppings or other pests. Have home treated as needed.
6. Test sump pump for reliable operation, especially before any rainy season.
7. Wash fan housing and metal filter connected to range hood exhaust fans. These can be safely washed by placing them inside the dishwasher.
8. Vacuum coils behind refrigerator/freezer to remove dust; this will improve efficiency of unit.
9. Tap off a bucket of water from the hot water heater until it runs clean.

Annually:

1. Inspect and repair settling cracks (if necessary).
2. Inspect and lubricate garage door tracks.
3. Inspect exterior paint for cracking and wear. Repaint or seal as needed.
4. Drain and refill water heater.
5. Trip main breaker on electric panel.
6. Inspect all electric cords and replace if necessary.
7. Inspect attic for water damage, birds, and rodents.
8. Inspect basement for moisture/mold and wood rot.
9. Inspect attic for signs of roof leaks or water damage, bird nests, rodent or squirrel nests, and clean if necessary.
10. Change water filters and have water softeners serviced.
11. Inspect roof flashings, chimney caps, shingles(for mold and damage) and caulking for possible damage.
12. Pressure wash deck, walkways and driveway.
13. Reseal wood decks with preservative and inspect and secure nails that may be protruding out. Nails have a tendency to pop out after very cold weather conditions.
14. Clean or replace oil filter(oil fired burner only).
15. Inspect outside electrical service feeder for exposed bare wires and tree interference.
16. Inspect basement/crawl space area for signs of termites and/or other wood-boring insects.
17. Use hose to wash off dirt from coil and fan in heat pump/condenser locate outside of house.
18. Inspect all hoses(and replace if necessary) connected to laundry washer unit.
19. Clean and seal ceramic tile grout lines in bathrooms/toilets/kitchen.
20. Check caulking at tub and shower, and replace if necessary.
21. Wash and blow clean bathroom exhaust fan grill and fan blades.
22. Wash windows(exterior and interior), screens, seals and ledges. Repair if necessary.
23. Clean and lubricate sliding glass door tracks and window tracks.
24. Check stucco joints around doors and windows.
25. Inspect the dishwasher's motor spin seal, and replace if necessary.
26. Inspect laundry washer, water fill hoses for cracks, blisters, corroded fittings and leaks.
27. Place beeswax or paraffin on built-in kitchen cabinets that have wooden guides.
28. Inspect for creosote deposits in the fireplace flue liner, these are black or brown residue of combustion that collects on the inner surfaces. If the buildup is more than 1/8 inch, remove it.
29. Vacuum around the gas hot water heater (especially near furnace) to remove dirt and grime.

Tips for clogged drains:

Keeping the Drains Clear:
1. By pouring a pot of hot water down the drain once a week will melt away any fat or grease that may have built up in the drain line or P-trap.
2. If you have a clogged drain, just pour a 1/2 cup of baking soda and 1/2 cup of white vinegar down the drain. Cover the drain and let the mixture sit for a few minutes, then pour a pot of hot water down the drain. This will break down fats and keep the drains smelling fresh.
3. Every six months, keep your drains clean by using a copper sulfide or sodium hydroxide-based drain cleaner, or other recommended drain cleaner available from your local store.

Other safety tips:

Ensure that you know where the following items are located:
1. Emergency contact telephone numbers.
2. Fire extinguishers and water hose pipes.
3. Heating gas/fuel main shutoff valve.
4. Main electrical disconnect circuit breaker (breaker box/service panel).
5. Main drain line clean out.
6. Main water shut off valve.
7. All window and door exits.

In addition to the above, carry out the following monthly safety checks:
Some of these items may have already be included in the home maintenance list, but these monthly safety checks are advisable for safety reasons:
1. Test ground fault circuit interrupter receptacles(GFCI's).
2. Test smoke and carbon monoxide alarms and replace batteries if necessary.
3. Inspect and lubricate (if necessary) all emergency exits, including windows and doors.
4. Inspection of heating unit and water heater for visual integrity.

Estimated life spans of most Home appliance:

1.Dishwasher water valves: 3-7 years
2.Range and oven: 18-20 years
3.Garbage disposal: 10 years
4.Microwave: 10 years
5.Refrigerator: 18-20 years
6.Laundry washer: 14 years
7.Laundry drier: 14 years
8.Refrigerator/Freezer: 18-20 years
9.Central air conditioner system: 15 years
10.Window mounted air conditioning system: 8 years
11.Bathtub/Sink: 50 years
12.Garage door opener: 10 years
13.Laundry water fill hoses: 3-5 years
14.Trash compactor: 10 years

Energy saving web-sites:

Perhaps you never thought of your home as a likely place to save you a lot of money, but it is. Most homes are far from being energy-efficient. That means if you are using more energy than you have to, you are also paying higher monthly bills than necessary. By checking out the following energy saving web sites, you will be able to gain some wise energy saving ideas that you will be able to put to use right away. You can do many of them yourself, others may require the services of a licensed contractor:

http://www1.eere.energy.gov/consumer/tips/
http://www.eere.energy.gov/buildings/building_america
http://www.aceee.org/consumerguide
http://www.efficientwindows.org
http://www.energy.gov/energysavingtips.htm
http://www.pge.com/myhome/saveenergymoney/savingstips/ http://www.fypower.org/res/tools/energy_tips.html
http://www.energyideas.org/documents/factsheets/hometips.pdf