Bryan's Best Home Inspection

Website: http://www.reporthost.com/bryansbest
Email: bryansbest@comcast.net
Phone: (707) 426-3333
FAX: (707) 426-6533

 

"Quality HOME Analysis Report" by
Bryan's BEST Home Inspection
Client(s): XXXXX
Property address: 715 Drive
Dixon, CA. 95620 U.S.A.
Inspection date: 11/12/2010
This report published on Wednesday, November 24, 2010 8:03:56 AM PST

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THANK YOU for choosing Bryan's Best Home Inspection. I know that providing my clients with a professional easy to understand report is an important part of my company success. I encourage any concerns or comments you may have.

Matthew 5:16

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Wood Destroying Organism Concerns
Concerns relating to wood destroying organisms are shown as follows:
InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
Conducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
General Information Return to table of contents
Report number: 32210%
Time started: 08:00
Time finished: 12:00
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: No
Weather conditions: Cloudy
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Damp
Inspection fee: $ 350.00
Payment method: Inspection was not paid for. This report is for use by inspector.
Age of building(s): 1971
Source for building age: Property listing
Front of building faces: East
Main entrance faces: East
Occupied: No
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Stucco covered with metal siding.
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Wood panel
1) One or more trip hazards were found in driveway sections due to cracks, settlement and/or heaving. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary to eliminate trip hazards.

Photo 4  
 

2) One or more outdoor electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all outdoor receptacles within six feet six inches of ground level have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

Photo 72  
 

3) Waterproof cover(s) over one or more electric receptacles are damaged or broken. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. Damaged covers should be replaced where necessary.

Photo 22  
 

4) One or more outside faucets are missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/BODY_AE079

Photo 20  
 

5) Rot was found in one or more areas on fascia boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.

Photo 29  

Photo 30  

6) Rot was found at one or more rafter and/or barge board ends. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing or removing rotten wood.

Photo 31  

Photo 32  

7) Cracks, deterioration and/or damage were found in one or more areas of the stucco siding. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace stucco siding as necessary.

Photo 10  
 

8) Fences and/or gates are damaged and/or deteriorated in some areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs or replace sections as necessary.

Photo 7  

Photo 11  

Photo 12  
 

9) One or more outside faucets leak. For example, from the valve stem when turned on or from the spigot when turned off. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Photo 21  
 

10) Moderate cracks and/or deterioration found in one or more sections of brick veneer. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as repointing mortar, replacing bricks and/or sections of veneer.

Photo 15  
 

11) One or more downspouts are loose or detached. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary so downspouts are securely anchored and functional.

Photo 9  
 

12) One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.

Photo 16  

Photo 14  

13) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

Photo 13  
 

14) The metal siding is detaching from wood fascia.

Photo 23  

Photo 27  

15) The plastic trim around one or more windows of the vehicle door is broken.

Photo 82  
 

16) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

Photo 2  

Photo 3  

17) Minor cracks were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

Photo 5  

Photo 8  

Photo 17  
 

18) One or more light fixtures have missing bulbs and could not be fully evaluated. Bulbs may simply need to be installed, or repairs or replacement may be necessary.

Photo 42  
 
 
Roof Return to table of contents
Roof type: Cross gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Estimated age of roof: 20+
Gutter & downspout material: Galvanized steel
Roof ventilation: Adequate
19) The roof surface material appears to be near the end of its service life and will likely need replacing in the near future, even with repairs. The client(s) should budget for a replacement roof surface, and may want to have a qualified roofing contractor evaluate and attempt to issue a "5 year roof certificate".

Photo 28  
Note granules in gutter.
 

20) This asphalt or fiberglass composition roof surface has two or more layers of roofing materials. When this roof is replaced, recommend a complete "tear off", where all existing layers of roofing are removed before installing new roofing materials. For 20-year rated composition shingles, additional layers of material reduce the new roof material's lifespan as follows:

  • 16-20 years - First roof
  • 12-16 years - Second layer on existing roof

    Removing existing roofing materials will significantly increase the cost of the next roof.

    Photo 24  
     

    21) One or more composition shingles have raised, most likely due to nails that have loosened. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as reseating nails.

    Photo 25  

    Photo 26  
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    22) One or more wall and/or ceiling surfaces between the attached garage and interior living spaces have gaps, holes, or missing or inadequate surface materials. These surfaces are intended to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces, and to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so the attached garage wall and ceiling surfaces that adjoin living spaces are tightly sealed and fire rated as per standard building practices. Typically these surfaces require a one-hour fire rating.

    Photo 43  

    Photo 49  

    23) One or more garage electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all garage receptacles, except for one for use with a refrigerator or freezer, have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 46  
     

    24) The garage-house door isn't equipped with an automatic closing device such as sprung hinges. This door should close and latch automatically to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces and/or to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should install automatic closing device(s) as necessary, and as per standard building practices, so this door closes and latches automatically.

    Photo 44  
     

    25) Cover plate(s) are not properly attached at one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be replaced where necessary.

    Photo 48  
    Cover plate is just taped on j-box.
     

    26) Trim is missing in one or more areas. Recommend having a qualified contractor install trim where missing.

    Photo 49  
     

    27) Minor cracks were found in the garage floor. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found at this time. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 47  
     
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Roof structure type: Trusses
    Ceiling structure: Trusses
    Insulation material: Cellulose loose fill
    28) Combustibles such as wood or insulation are in contact with or less than one inch from chimney or gas flue pipes in one or more areas. This is a fire hazard. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs or modifications as necessary so minimum clearances to combustibles are maintained around all chimney and flue pipes as per the manufacturer's specifications.

    Photo 75  
     

    29) Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may be caused by a past leak. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about past leaks. The client(s) should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 76  

    Photo 77  

    Photo 78  

    Photo 79  

    Photo 80  
     

    30) Stains were visible on the vent pipe in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may be caused by a past leak. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about past leaks. The client(s) should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 74  
     
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Underground
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 100
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: On the North side of the garage.
    Location of sub panels:
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed, Aluminum multi-strand
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: Yes
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    31) One or more wires in the remote service (sub) panel appear to be undersized for their overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    32) One or more breakers that share a neutral have no breaker bonding bar. When one circuit is tripped the other circuit will have a higher voltage. Possible equipment damage will result. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as needed.

    Photo 51  

    Photo 52  

    33) One or more pointed and/or too-long screws are used to fasten the cover to the main service panel. These types of screws are more likely to come into contact with wiring inside the panel than stock screws from the manufacturer, and can damage wiring insulation. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and/or fire. Long and/or pointed crews should be replaced as necessary with the correct screws, and if necessary by a qualified electrician.

    Photo 54  
     

    34) The main service panel cover is missing or not installed. Exposed, energized wiring and equipment exists as a result and is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. The panel cover should be reinstalled or replaced, and by a qualified electrician if necessary.

    Photo 6  
     

    35) One or more bushings are missing from where wires enter holes in the main service panel. This is a safety hazard since the wiring insulation can be cut or abraded on the metal edge of the hole(s). A qualified electrician should install bushings where missing.

    Photo 36  
     

    36) The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in the main service panel is missing, unreadable or incomplete. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 12/2005
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    Manufacturer: General Electric
    Model: SmartWater
    37) No drip leg is installed on the water heater gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the water heater components. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Forced air, Up draft, Standard efficiency
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
    Manufacturer: Ruud
    Filter location: At the base of the furnace
    38) The exterior disconnect switch for the outside condensing unit has unidentified white wires used as hot power leg. This could lead to electrocution during maintenance. A qualified electrical contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 35  
    At disconnect switch.

    Photo 53  
    At sub-panel.

    39) The weather tight conduit has become detached and can allow water to enter and also allow the wires to rub on metal. This could result in electrocution and/or equipment damage. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as needed.

    Photo 33  

    Photo 34  

    40) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    41) The estimated useful life for most heat pumps is 15 to 20 years. This heat pump appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    42) The drain line connections from the A/C are not glued. Joints are easily separated and leak water onto the wood surface. This could result in dry rot. Recommend that all joints be checked and glued.

    Photo 40  

    Photo 41  

    43) No drip leg is installed on the furnace or boiler gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the furnace or boiler components. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.

    Photo 37  
     

    44) Insulation for the outside condensing unit's refrigerant lines is damaged, deteriorated and/or missing in one or more areas. This may result in reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should replace insulation as necessary.

    Photo 18  
     

    45) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.
    46) Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be washed now. They should be checked monthly in the future and washed as necessary.

    Photo 39  
     

    47) The outdoor air temperature was below 60 degrees Fahrenheit during the inspection. Because of this, the inspector was unable to operate and fully evaluate the cooling system.
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): 40 lbs.
    Location of main water shut-off valve: At the front of the home.
    Location of main fuel shut-off: On the North side of the garage.
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Plastic
    Drain pipe material: Plastic
    Waste pipe material: Not visible
    48) The electric receptacle for the laundry has reverse-polarity wiring, where the hot and neutral wires are reversed. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 45  
     

    49) The clothes dryer exhaust duct appears to need cleaning. Significant amounts of lint build up was found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire from decreased air flow. This duct should be cleaned now and annually, or more often if necessary in the future. Some chimney sweeps or heating/cooling duct cleaners perform this service. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html or http://chimneykeepers.com/dryerclean.html

    Photo 50  
     

    50) Copper water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:

  • Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than six hours.
  • Install appropriate filters at points of use.
  • Use only cold water for cooking and drinking. Hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water.
  • Use bottled or distilled water.
  • Treat well water to make it less corrosive.
  • Have a qualified plumbing contractor replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components as necessary.

    For more information visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html
    http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html
    51) Water pressure is below 40 psi, but the flow appeared to be adequate. 40-80 psi is considered to be the normal range for water pressure in a home. The inspector performed a "functional flow test" during the inspection, where multiple fixtures are run simultaneously, and found there to be adequate flow. For example, the shower flow did not decrease significantly when the toilet was flushed.

    If the client finds the flow to be inadequate, recommend having a qualified plumber evaluate and repair as necessary. Installing a pressure boosting system is one possible solution. For information on these systems, visit: http://www.low-water-pressure.com/

    Photo 19  
     
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    52) One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric receptacles did not trip when tested with the inspector's test instrument. These devices should trip when tested with a test instrument in addition to tripping via the test buttons on the receptacles. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    *** NO POWER ***

    Photo 55  

    Photo 56  

    53) The range can tip forward, and no anti-tip bracket appears to be installed. This is a safety hazard since the range may tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it, or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free standing ranges since 1985. An anti-tip bracket should be installed to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/remodeling/article/0,1797,HGTV_3659_2017492,00.html

    Photo 59  
     

    54) The oven bake function appears to be inoperable. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this, and if necessary, a qualified appliance technician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    *** NO GAS CONNECTED ***

    Photo 57  
     

    55) The oven broil function appears to be inoperable. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this, and if necessary, a qualified appliance technician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    *** NO GAS CONNECTED ***

    56) One or more stove top burners are inoperable. A qualified appliance technician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    *** NO GAS CONNECTED ***

    Photo 57  
     

    57) One or more electric receptacles appear to have no power. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 55  

    Photo 56  

    Photo 58  
     
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    58) One or more sink drains have an active leak. For example, at pipe fittings and/or junctions between pipe and sink. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 73  
     

    59) Drawers are difficult to open and close in one or more cabinets. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 66  
    Note the chipped corner.
     

    60) Recommend cleaning and sealing grout in tile or stone flooring now and in the future as necessary to prevent staining and to improve waterproofing.

    Photo 67  
     
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    61) The light fixture in one or more long hallways is controlled by a single switch at one end. This is a safety hazard due to inadequate lighting. The light should be controlled by three-way switches near each end of the hallway so it can be easily operated at both ends. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 64  
     

    62) Cover plate(s) are broken at one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be replaced where necessary.

    Photo 61  
     

    63) Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    Photo 81  
     

    64) One or more electric receptacles appear to have no power. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 63  
     

    65) Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.

    Photo 65  

    Photo 71  

    66) One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.

    Photo 62  
     

    67) Screen(s) in one or more windows are torn or have holes in them. Screens should be replaced where necessary.

    Photo 69  
     

    68) The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

    Photo 38  
     

    69) One or more bedroom doors has no gap between it and the floor below, or has a gap substantially less than one inch. This structure has a forced air heating system with centrally located return air ducts. When bedroom doors are closed, the only effective path for return air out of the bedrooms is under the doors. A minimum gap of one inch below bedroom doors is recommended to allow an adequate air flow for return air. Recommend trimming the bottoms of bedroom doors as necessary so each door has a minimum one inch gap at its base.

    Photo 68  
     

    70) Minor cracks were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 60  
     

    71) Minor evidence of wall repair was noted in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 70  
     

     
    Please contact me after reading your report to discuss any questions you may have about the concerns I have noted, or comments you would like to share. THANK YOU from Bryan Mathew @ Bryan's Best Home Inspection.

    Colossians 3:16