Bryan's Best Home Inspection

Website: http://www.reporthost.com/bryansbest
Email: bryansbest@comcast.net
Phone: (707) 426-3333
FAX: (707) 426-6533

  

"Quality HOME Analysis Report" by
Bryan's Best Home Inspection
Client(s): Bryan and Rachel Kirchgestner
Property address: 920 Longspur Drive
Suisun City, CA. 94585-2149 U.S.A.
Inspection date: Tuesday, June 09, 2009
This report published on 6/10/2009 8:39:45 PM PDT

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THANK YOU for choosing Bryan's Best Home Inspection. I know that providing my clients with a professional easy to understand report is an important part of my company success. I encourage any concerns or comments you may have.

Matthew 5:16

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Structural Pest Inspection Concerns
Items of concern relating to the structural pest inspection are shown as follows:
WDO/WDI InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
WDO/WDI DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
WDO/WDI Conducive
conditions
Conditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Crawl space
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
Kitchen
 
General Information Return to table of contents
Report number: 16009
Time started: 10:00
Time finished: 13:30
Inspector: Bryan M. Kirchgestner
Present during inspection: Client
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions: Partly cloudy
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Damp
Occupied: Yes
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood panels, Stucco
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
1)   One or more outside faucets are missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/BODY_AE079

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2) The exterior finish over the entire structure is failing. A qualified painting contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain the entire structure as per standard building practices.

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3) Rot was found at one or more trim boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing or removing rotten wood.

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4) Rot was found in one or more areas on deck boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.

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5) Cracks, deterioration and/or damage were found in one or more areas of the stucco siding. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace stucco siding as necessary.

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6)   Fences and/or gates are damaged and/or deteriorated in some areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs or replace sections as necessary.

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7)   One or more outside water lines leak. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

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8) One or more gutters are damaged. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should replace or repair gutters where necessary.

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9) Decking boards are spaced closer together than 3/8 inch with accumulated organic debris (leaves, fir needles, etc.). This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Debris should be cleaned as necessary to prevent accumulation and resultant rot. If or when the deck boards are replaced, recommend spacing boards so they're at least 3/8 inch apart to allow debris to fall through the cracks rather than accumulate in them.

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10)   One or more deck boards have started pulling away from deck.

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11) Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.

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12)   Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

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13)   Minor cracks were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
 
Roof Return to table of contents
Roof inspection method: Viewed from eaves on ladder
Roof type: Cross gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Gutter & downspout material: Steel
Roof ventilation: Adequate
14) Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.

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15) Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.

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Garage Return to table of contents

16)   Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed in one or more areas so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.

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17)   Minor cracks were found in the garage floor. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

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Attic Return to table of contents
Inspection method: Traversed
Roof structure type: Trusses
Ceiling structure: Trusses
Insulation material:
18)   Evidence of "light to moderate" rodent infestation was found in one or more areas. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines this as less than 20 feces per square foot. Rodent infestation may be a safety hazard due to the risk of contracting Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). HPS is a rare (only 20-50 cases per year in the United states) but deadly (40% mortality rate) disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. For example, from sweeping up rodent droppings.

Recommend following guidelines in the CDC's Clean Up, Trap Up, Seal Up article for eradicating rodents, cleaning up their waste and nesting materials, and preventing future infestations. While Hantavirus is believed to survive less than one week in droppings and urine, specific precautions should be taken during clean up. The client(s) may wish to consult with a qualified, licensed pest control operator for eliminating the infestation. A qualified licensed abatement contractor or industrial hygienist could be contacted for clean up. If the infestation was minimal, clean up of rodent waste and nesting materials in non-living spaces (crawl spaces and attics) may not be necessary, or may be performed for aesthetic reasons only (odor and appearance).

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Rodent trail through insulation.

19)   Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

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20)   Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may be caused by a past leak. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about past leaks. The client(s) should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

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Electric service Return to table of contents
Primary service type: Underground
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 100
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of sub panels:
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed, Aluminum multi-strand
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: Yes
Smoke detectors present: Yes
21)   One or more wires in the sub-panel appear to be undersized for their overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

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#12 is rated for 20 amps. #8 is needed for 40 amps.
 

22)   Neutral and equipment ground conductors are combined at one or more sub-panels. This should only occur in the main service panel, and is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. Neutral conductors should be attached to a "floating" neutral bar not bonded to the panel, while grounding conductors should be attached to a separate grounding bar bonded to the sub panel. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Photo 9  
Blue arrow is ground mixed with neutrals. Red arrow is white wire for hot leg.
 

23)   One or more unidentified white wires used as hot leg. This is a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrical contractor evaluate and repair as needed.

Photo 9  
Blue arrow is ground mixed with neutrals. Red arrow is white wire for hot leg.

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24)   One or more breakers with a shared neutral are missing breaker tie. This is to keep neutral from becoming over loaded if one leg trips. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as needed.

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25)   One or more bushings are missing from where wires enter holes in the main service panel. This is a safety hazard since the wiring insulation can be cut or abraded on the metal edge of the hole(s). A qualified electrician should install bushings where missing.

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Water heater Return to table of contents
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): Not visible
26)   No drip leg is installed on the water heater gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the water heater components. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.
27)   A permanently installed insulated jacket is installed on the water heater. It obscures the manufacturer's information label and most of the water heater. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate the water heater.
 
Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air, High efficiency
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Distribution system: Flexible ducts
Manufacturer: Trane
Filter location: At the base of the furnace
28)   One or more flexible gas supply connectors are routed through a metal cabinet. Standard building practices require that solid iron pipe be used where gas supply lines are routed through holes in metal cabinets. Continued vibration from this equipment may cause the edge of the metal cabinet to wear through the flexible connector, resulting in gas leaks. This is a safety hazard. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or modifications as necessary.

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29)   The outside condensing unit is not level. Damage may occur if it is more than ten degrees off from level. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as replacing the pad that the condensing unit is installed on.

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30)   The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.
31)   The cooling fins on the outdoor condensing unit's evaporator coils are dirty. This may result in reduced efficiency and higher energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should clean the evaporator coils as necessary.

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32)   Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.

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Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
Water pressure (psi): 60 psi.
Location of main water shut-off valve: At the front of the home.
Location of main water meter: At the front sidewalk.
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Copper
Supply pipe material: Copper
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Plastic
33) One or more active leaks were found in drain and/or waste pipes or fittings. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

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Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
Fireplace type: Masonry
Chimney type: Metal
34)   All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
 
Crawl space Return to table of contents
Inspection method: Traversed
Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
Pier or support post material: Concrete
Beam material: Steel
Vapor barrier present: No
35)   Insulation under the floor in the crawlspace is damaged, deteriorated, or has fallen down. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary to restore the insulation to its original rating.

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Starting to fall down in one or more areas.
 

36) Cellulose-based debris such as wood scraps, form wood, cardboard and/or paper were found in crawl space. All cellulose-based debris should be removed to avoid attracting wood destroying insects.

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Bathrooms Return to table of contents

37) One or more bathrooms with a shower do not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers. *** The master bath. ***
38)   One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

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Interior rooms Return to table of contents

39)   Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.
40)   Squeaking or creaking noises occur when walking on one or more sections of flooring. This is usually caused by substandard construction practices where the subfloor decking is not adequately fastened to the framing below. For example, not enough glue was used and/or nails were used rather than screws. In most cases, this is only an annoyance rather than a structural problem. Various solutions such as Squeeeeek No More and Counter Snap fasteners exist to correct this. Repairs to eliminate the squeaks or creaks may be more or less difficult depending on the floor covering, and the access to the underside of the subfloor. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
41)   Carpeting in one or more rooms is loose. Recommend having a qualified carpeting installation contractor restretch carpet as necessary.
42)   Carpeting in one or more rooms is damaged. Recommend replacing carpeting where necessary.

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43)   Screen(s) in one or more windows are torn or have holes in them. Screens should be replaced where necessary.

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44)   Noted toe stubber were carpet meets the tile. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as needed.

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45)   One or more closet doors are off track.

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46)   Carpeting in one or more rooms is soiled and/or stained. Recommend having carpeting professionally cleaned as necessary.

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Kitchen Return to table of contents

47)   One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

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Please contact me after reading your report to discuss any questions you may have about the concerns I have noted, or comments you would like to share. THANK YOU from Bryan Mathew @ Bryan's Best Home Inspection.

Colossians 3:16