Better Inspection Service, LLC

Website: http://www.reporthost.com/betterinspsvs
Email: fredmerrill727@yahoo.com
Phone: (678) 777-4576
81 Observation Way 
Dallas, Ga. 30132
Inspector: Fred Merrill

 

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Myers, David & Christine
Property address: 171 Poplar Farms Dr.
Hiram, GA. 30141
Inspection date: 9-5-2007
This report published on 9/5/2007 8:56:51 PM EDT

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major defectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor defectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Basement
Kitchen
Interior rooms
Bathrooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: Myers001
Structures inspected: 171 Poplar Farms Dr.
Hiram, GA. 30141

Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 1 year
Property owner's name: David & Christine Myers
Time started: 9:00 a.m.
Time finished: 11:45 a.m.
Inspection Fee: 300.00
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Property owner(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Partly cloudy
Temperature: Warm 80 degrees
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: Southwest
Main entrance faces: Southwest
Foundation type: Unfinished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Security system, Irrigation system, Swimming pool, Hot tub, Private well, Shed, Playground equipment, Sauna, Low voltage outdoor lighting, Central vacuum system, Water filtration system, Water softener system, Built-in sound system, Intercom system, Generator system, Sport court, Sea wall, Outbuildings


1) Some wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by furniture and/or stored items. Some areas couldn't be evaluated.
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Not visible
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Cement-based clapboard/brick veneer
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: SC Steel
Footing material: Not visible
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Cement-based clapboard, Brick veneer
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core steel
2) One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in are loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Receptacle on North side of house is loose.

3) Flashing is missing from above one or more deck ledger boards. This can cause moisture to accumulate between the ledger board(s) and the structure. Rot may result in this area and cause the ledger board fasteners to fail. The deck may separate from the structure in this event and poses a significant safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install flashing above ledger board(s) where necessary. For more information on installing deck ledger boards visit: http://www.hometime.com/Howto/projects/decks/deck_4.htm

And for more information on building safe decks in general, visit: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow/exteriors/article/0,16417,212625,00.html

Flashing is present as seen in photos however, it is flashed improperly. Flashing also has a hole in it. we recommend re flashing so that the flashing material is at least 6" under the siding material above.

Photo 15  
flashing under rear deck.

Photo 16  
hole in flashing above deck surface.

4) Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.

Photo 5  

Photo 7  
one example of several locations

5) Siding is incomplete or missing in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should install siding where missing to prevent water and vermin intrusion.

Photo 9  
siding missing
 

6) One or more wooden deck support posts are in contact with soil. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. However no damage from wood destroying insects or organisms was found. Standard building practices require that there be at least 6" of space between any wood and the soil below, even if the wood is treated. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. Otherwise recommend installing borate based Impel rods to prevent rot.
7) Minor cracks were found in one or more sections of brick veneer. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as repointing mortar to prevent water intrusion and further deterioration in the future.
8) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

Photo 2  

Photo 8  

9) The driveway has significant cracks and/or deterioration in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace driveway sections as necessary.
10) Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.

Photo 4  
 

11) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.
    12) Recommend cleaning deck(s) and railing(s) and treating with a preservative claiming to waterproof, block ultraviolet light, and stop mildew. Consumer Reports recommends these products:

  • Cabot Decking Stain and PTW Stain
  • Olympic Water Repellent Deck Stain
  • Thompson's House and Deck Stain
  • Wolman PTW Deck Stain
  • Akzo Sikkens Cetol DEK
  • Benjamin Moore Moorwood Clear Wood Finish
  • DAP Woodlife Premium
  • Olympic Natural Look Protector Plus
    13) Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit The Ins and Outs of Caulking.

    Photo 7  
    one example of several locations
     
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars
    Roof type: Cross gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 6 years old
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars
    Roof type: Cross gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 1 year
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    14) Because of the roof covering type and/or the configuration of the roof, the inspector was unable to traverse the roof and wasn't able to fully evaluate the entire roof.
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    15) No hatch is installed over the attic access opening. A one-hour, fire-rated hatch should be installed to slow or prevent the spread of fire from the attached garage to interior living spaces. Typically these hatches are made from 5/8 inch Type X sheetrock.

    Photo 11  
     
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Partially traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
    Insulation depth: adequate
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Roof structure type: Trusses
    Ceiling structure: Trusses
    Insulation material: Cellulose loose fill
    Insulation depth: 5" or 6"
    Insulation estimated R value: R20
    16) The ceiling insulation's R rating is significantly less than what's recommended for this area. Recommend having a qualified contractor install additional insulation as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency.
    17) Some attic areas were inaccessible due to lack of permanently installed walkways, the possibility of damage to insulation, low height and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Underground
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Primary service type: Underground
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: North wall of garage near home entrance door.
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at bottom of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    System ground: No ground system was located!
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
    Branch circuit wiring type: Copper
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    18) Bond and neutrals are terminated on the same bar. They should be separated. Also , no grounding system could be seen. This is a major safety concern. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair if necessary.

    Photo 10  
     

    19) One or more clamps that secure the electric service's grounding electrode conductor(s) to the grounding rod(s) are loose. Grounding may be inadequate as a result and may be a safety hazard for shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    The ground rod and clamp in this photo is for the cable system and it is loose.

    Photo 6  
     
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): set on high. the home owner said there was a mixing valve installed to compensate.
    Estimated age: 1 year
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Electricity
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    Manufacturer: Rheem
    20) Based on the capacity of the water heater, the number of bedrooms in this structure and the number of occupants expected to live in this structure, this water heater may be undersized. The clients should consult with a qualified plumbing contractor or water heater distributor for more information, and may wish to upgrade the size of the water heater.
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 1 year
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Heat pump
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Heat pump
    Distribution system: Flexible ducts
    Manufacturer: Carrier
    Filter location: In return air duct below furnace
    Last service date: due for annual servicing.
    21) Air handler filter(s) should be checked monthly in the future and replaced or washed as necessary.
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): 50 psi
    Location of main water shut-off valve: basement
    Location of main water meter: exterior
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Polyethelene
    Supply pipe material: CPVC
    Vent pipe material: Plastic
    Drain pipe material: Plastic
    Waste pipe material: Plastic
    22) One or more waste pipe cleanouts have no cap installed. This is a safety hazard because sewer gases may vent into the structure. A qualified plumber should install a caps where missing.

    This is a temporary cap and should be replaced.

    Photo 3  
     

    23) Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Metal prefabricated
    24) The gas supply for one or more gas fireplaces and/or stoves was turned off. As per the Standards of Practice for both the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI) and the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) the inspector does not operate gas shut off valves or light pilot lights during inspections. These appliances were not fully evaluated.
    25)   The electrical receptacle below the fireplace was not working at the time of the inspection.
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Pier or support post material: Bearing wall
    Beam material: Built up wood
    Floor structure above: Engineered wood joists
    26) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

    Photo 14  
     

    27) Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. For example, water stains and/or efflorescence on the foundation or floor, water stains at bases of support posts, etc. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.
    28) Uninsulated exterior wall. This could result in severe energy loss. Recommend adding Kraft backed insulation batts of R19 or better on all wood framed exterior walls.

    Photo 13  
     

    29)   No trim on basement side of door at top of stairs. This results in a reduction of fire rating. Recommendadding trim by a qualified contractor.

    Photo 12  
     
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    30) Homeowner stated that all appliances were working properly. No appliances were inspected at this time.
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    31) Squeaking or creaking noises occur when walking on one or more sections of flooring. This is usually caused by substandard construction practices where the subfloor decking is not adequately fastened to the framing below. For example, not enough glue was used and/or nails were used rather than screws. In most cases, this is only an annoyance rather than a structural problem. Various solutions such as Squeeeeek No More and Counter Snap fasteners exist to correct this. Repairs to eliminate the squeaks or creaks may be more or less difficult depending on the floor covering, and the access to the underside of the subfloor. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
    32) Many of the window screens fit poorly or improperly. Recommend repair or replace all improperly fitting screens.
    33) Minor cracks were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    34) Caulk is missing or deteriorated along the base of one or more showers, where flooring meets the shower. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the floor structure.
    Shower in the master bath is suspect.

     
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