A.T.Martin home inspections

Website: http://www.reporthost.com/atmartin
Company email: psalm1martin@hotmail.com
Inspector's email: anthonymartin.martin@gmail.com
Phone: (770) 906-7294
341 Jesse Martin Trail 
Canton GA 30115-5951

 

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Mr. Sample Report
Property address: 333 Beautiful Road Anywhere GA XXXXX
Inspection date: 7/28/2010
This report published on Wednesday, July 28, 2010 2:40:45 PM EDT

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Interior rooms
Kitchen
Master bath
Bathrooms
Basement
Attic

 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 279-7910
Inspector's name: Anthony Martin
Structures inspected: Residential
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 1983
Aprox. Sq. Ft.: 1728
Time started: 10 AM
Time finished: 1;30 PM
Inspection Fee: 275.00
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Client(s)
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Hot
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: East
Main Entrance Faces: East
Foundation type: Unfinished basement
Number of Bedrooms: 3
Number of Bathrooms: 2 1/2
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Not visible
Foundation material: Concrete block
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Vinyl
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core steel
1) One or more outdoor electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all outdoor receptacles within six feet six inches of ground level have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

Photo 3  

2) One or more light fixtures are loose or installed in a substandard way. A qualified contractor or electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so light fixtures are securely mounted and installed in accordance with the manufacturer's installation instructions.

Photo 2  

3) One or more outside faucets are missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit:
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/AE113

4) The driveway has significant cracks and the section beside the house slopes toward the house . Cement has been poured around the edge of house to attempt to divert water away from the house. The basement has been flooded, this may be the source of water entry into basement. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace driveway sections as necessary.

Photo 1  

5) One or more gutters are poorly sloped so that significant amounts of water accumulate in them rather than draining through the downspouts. This can cause gutters to overflow, especially when organic debris such as leaves or needles have accumulated in them. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as correcting the slope in gutters or installing additional downspouts and extensions if necessary.
6) One or more downspouts are loose or detached. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary so downspouts are securely anchored and functional.

Photo 4  

7) One or more gutters are damaged and pulling away from house. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should replace or repair gutters where necessary.

Photo 7  

8) Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.
9) One or more wooden deck support posts are in contact with soil. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. However no damage from wood destroying insects or organisms was found. Standard building practices require that there be at least 6" of space between any wood and the soil below, even if the wood is treated. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. Otherwise recommend installing borate based Impel rods to prevent rot. For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=impel+rods

10) One or more moderate cracks (1/8 inch to 3/4 inch) were found in the foundation. These may be a structural concern, or an indication that settlement is ongoing. The client(s) should consider hiring qualified contractors and/or engineers as necessary for further evaluation. Such contractors may include:

  • Foundation repair contractors who may prescribe repairs, and will give cost estimates for prescribed repairs
  • Masonry contractors who repair and/or replace brick veneer
  • Geotechnical engineers who attempt to determine if settlement is ongoing, and what the cause of the settlement is
  • Structural engineers who determine if repairs are necessary, and prescribe those repairs

    At a minimum, recommend sealing cracks to prevent water infiltration. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply).
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair).
    11) Vegetation such as trees, grass and weeds are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
    12) Trees are in contact with the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.

    Photo 5  

    13) Recommend cleaning deck(s) and railing(s) and treating with a preservative claiming to waterproof, block ultraviolet light, and stop mildew. Consumer Reports recommends these products:

  • Cabot Decking Stain and PTW Stain
  • Olympic Water Repellent Deck Stain
  • Thompson's House and Deck Stain
  • Wolman PTW Deck Stain
  • Akzo Sikkens Cetol DEK
  • Benjamin Moore Moorwood Clear Wood Finish
  • DAP Woodlife Premium
  • Olympic Natural Look Protector Plus
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof Vents ( Types): gable and soffit
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    Pluming Vents: two need caulking
    Flashing and Rubber Boots: satisfactory
    Dormers: 2
    Skylights: 1
    Number of Chimneys: 1
    14) One or more composition shingles are damaged, deteriorated and/or missing, and should be replaced. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 8  

    15) Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Location of main service switch: Basement
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
    16) The main service panel cover is installed so it is not flush with the surface of the panel box and disconnect devices. Gaps exist, resulting in exposed wiring. The cover is covering one breaker at the bottom . The panel is mounted with wood screws to the 2x4 studs beside service panel. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified contractor and/or electrician should evaluate and repair so the panel cover fits on the panel box as the manufacturer intended.

    Photo 11  

    17) One or more screws are missing from the main service panel cover and should be replaced. Because energized wiring may exist behind the holes with the missing screws, recommend that a qualified, licensed electrician replace these screws, or that care be taken to ensure that the new screws do not come in contact with wiring inside the panel when they are installed. Stock screws from the panel manufacturer should be used, or their equivalent.
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 4/2010
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Electricity
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    Manufacturer: General Electric
    Model: GE 40M06AAG
    18) Water Heater expansion tank not secured properly, a qualified contractor should repair / replace

    Photo 27  

     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: Manufacture date 3-11-2009
    Primary heating system energy source: Electric
    Primary heat system type: Heat pump
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Heat pump
    Distribution system: Flexible ducts
    Manufacturer: Haier
    Model: AASYX0E0200NK93B0010
    19) The outside condensing unit is not level. Damage may occur if it is more than ten degrees off from level. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as replacing the pad that the condensing unit is installed on.
    20) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.
    21) Vegetation such as grass and weeds are too close to the outdoor condensing unit. Standard building practices require that there be at least 12 inches of clearance on all sides and at least four to six feet above. Inadequate clearances around the condensing unit can result in reduced efficiency, increased energy costs and/or damage to equipment. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain these clearances.
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): 60 psi
    Location of main water meter: could not locate
    Location of main fuel shut-off: n/a
    Visible fuel storage systems: no
    Water service: Public
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Plastic
    Drain pipe material: Plastic
    Waste pipe material: Plastic
    22) A broken toilet and tub in basement should be evaluated and repaired if necessary by a qualified plumber.

    Photo 28  

    23) Disconnected or broken sections of drain and/or waste pipes are open in basement. P traps can dry out and gasses can come into house. The client(s) may wish to have a qualified plumber evaluate now and repair if necessary.

    Photo 29  

    24) The inspector was not able to find the water meter. Recommend that the client(s) attempt to find the water meter by consulting with the property owner(s), searching for it themselves, or consulting with the local water municipality. It is especially important to find the meter if no main shut-off valve is found because the meter may be the only way to turn off the water supply in the event of an emergency, such as when a supply pipe bursts.
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Metal prefabricated
    Chimney type: Metal
    25) The screen at fireplace opening is rusty and will not close, and the damper in fireplace is stuck and cannot be opened or closed. A qualified chimney service contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    26) All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    27) One or more open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found in bedroom to right on second floor. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices. Replacement of three-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles is not an acceptable solution.

    Photo 9  

    Photo 10  

    28) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    29) Lamp holders or light fixtures with fully or partially exposed bulbs are installed in one or more closets. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Flammable stored items may come into contact with hot bulbs, and hot fragments from broken bulbs may fall on combustible materials. Standard building practices require closet lighting to use fluorescent light fixtures, or to use fully enclosed incandescent fixtures. Installing a compact fluorescent lamp in a lamp holder is not an acceptable practice. A qualified electrician should replace closet lights as necessary and as per standard building practices.
    30) Seals between double-pane glass in one or more windows appear to have failed based on condensation or stains between the panes of glass. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace glass where necessary.

    The client(s) should be aware that evidence of broken seals may be more or less visible from one day to the next depending on the temperature, humidity, sunlight, etc. Windows or glass doors other than those that the inspector identified may also have failed seals and need glass replaced too.

    31) One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors.
    32) No deadbolt mechanisms on side entry door. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    33) The doorbell button is missing wires are hanging loose beside door on north side of house. It should be repaired or replaced as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
    34) Lock mechanisms on one or more windows are missing and/or damaged so that they are inoperable. Repairs should be made by a qualified contractor or service technician so that windows lock and unlock easily.
    35) locksets are damaged front entry door and, the north side entry door Locksets should be replaced as necessary.
    36) Exterior entrance door on north side entry is damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.
    37) Master bedroom closet light fixture appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
    38) Living room ceiling fan appear to be inoperable. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this, and if necessary, having a qualified electrician evaluate and repair as necessary.
    39) There was evidence of apparent ceiling repair found in living room. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found. The stain/repair may be due to past roof and/or plumbing leaks. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this, and monitoring the stained area(s) in the future, especially after heavy or prolonged rain. If elevated moisture is found in the future, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    40) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    41) The range can tip forward, and no anti-tip bracket appears to be installed. This is a safety hazard since the range may tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it, or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free standing ranges since 1985. An anti-tip bracket should be installed to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=range+anti+tip+device

    42) The dishwasher drain line is not configured with a "high loop" or "air gap". A high loop is created by routing the drain line up to the bottom surface of the counter top above, and securely fastening it to that surface. It is meant to prevent water from siphoning out of the dishwasher, and to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. Some dishwashers have a built-in high loop where one is not required to be configured in the drain line. The clients should try to determine if a high loop is required for this brand and model of dishwasher (review installation instructions, etc.). If one is required, or it cannot be determined if one is not required, then a qualified contractor should install a high loop as per standard building practices.

    Also, no "air gap" is installed. Air gaps are another device meant to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. These are required in some municipalities for new construction and when remodeling. The client(s) should consult with a qualified contractor to determine if an air gap should be installed.

    43) faucet leaks by handle(s) or at their base when turned on. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    44) Handles and/or drawer pulls are not installed on one or more cabinets, where the drawers and/or doors are difficult to open without them. Recommend installing handles and/or pulls as necessary.
     
    Master bath Return to table of contents
    Location: main floor
    Switches: operational
    Light fixtures:
    Doors: satisfactory
    Vanity / Cabinets: missing handle right drawer
    Sinks: stopper good/ drains good
    Toilet: would not flush
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    45) Master bath electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    46) In 1/2 bath ground fault circuit interrupter protection devices were defective. Because one GFCI device may in turn provide GFCI protection for other electric receptacles on the same circuit, the inspector was unable to determine if all electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks are protected with a GFCI device. If they are not, a safety hazard due to the risk of shock exists. After repairs are made to the defective GFCI device(s), a qualified electrician should evaluate, determine if all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks are protected by GFCI devices, and make repairs if necessary.
    47) One or more toilets appear to be clogged, and/or do not flush adequately. A qualified plumber should evaluate and make repairs or replace toilet(s) as necessary.
    48) master bathroom with a shower does not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.
    49) One or more shower heads are missing replace/repair by a qualified plumber.
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Bearing wall, Steel
    Beam material: Built up wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    50) Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed in one or more areas so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.

    Photo 12  

    51) One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.

    Photo 13  

    Photo 14  

    Photo 15  

    52) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 16  

    Photo 17  

    Photo 18  

    53) Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. For example, bottom plate, studs and bottom of stairs were still wet. Concrete block in north two corners of basement appeared to be deteriorating from water intrusion. Concrete blocks were damp, also water stains were evident on the foundation and /or floor, and at bases of support posts, etc. A qualified contractor who specializes in water damage should evaluate and repair as necessary. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.

    Photo 21  

    Photo 24  

    Photo 30  

    Photo 31  

    54) One or more basement walls have minor cracks, some are stepped cracks and some are horizontal cracks. Horizontal cracks are a major concern. The pressure of the dirt behind them has bent the wall, and the crack is the hinge point. It appears that 4x4 support post have been installed to support the east and west basement wall. A qualified structural engineer should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 19  

    Photo 20  

    Photo 22  

    Photo 23  

    Photo 25  

    55) One or more floor joists have damage/decay. This has damaged the joist(s).There was no presence of wood destroying pests at time of inspection. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 26  

    56) The basement exterior entrance door casing is damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

    Photo 6  

    57) The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. This can also allow water intrusion. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
    Light Present: yes
    58) Evidence of "light to moderate" rodent infestation was found in one or more areas. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines this as less than 20 feces per square foot. Rodent infestation may be a safety hazard due to the risk of contracting Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). HPS is a rare (only 20-50 cases per year in the United states) but deadly (40% mortality rate) disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. For example, from sweeping up rodent droppings.

    Recommend following guidelines in the CDC's Clean Up, Trap Up, Seal Up article for eradicating rodents, cleaning up their waste and nesting materials, and preventing future infestations. While Hantavirus is believed to survive less than one week in droppings and urine, specific precautions should be taken during clean up. The client(s) may wish to consult with a qualified, licensed pest control operator for eliminating the infestation. A qualified licensed abatement contractor or industrial hygienist could be contacted for clean up. If the infestation was minimal, clean up of rodent waste and nesting materials in non-living spaces (crawl spaces and attics) may not be necessary, or may be performed for aesthetic reasons only (odor and appearance).

    59) No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.
     

    Photo 32  
    Heat Pump label on outside unit.

     
    Home inspectors are not required to report on the following: Life expectancy of any component or system; The causes of the need for a repair; The methods, materials, and costs of corrections; The suitability of the property for any specialized use; Compliance or non-compliance with codes, ordinances, statutes, regulatory requirements or restrictions; The market value of the property or its marketability; The advisability or inadvisability of purchase of the property; Any component or system that was not observed; The presence or absence of pests such as wood damaging organisms, rodents, or insects; or Cosmetic items, underground items, or items not permanently installed. Horne inspectors are not required to: Offer warranties or guarantees of any kind; Calculate the strength, adequacy, or efficiency of any system or component; Enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to the home inspector or other persons; Operate any system or component that is shut down or otherwise inoperable; Operate any system or component that does not respond to normal operating controls; Disturb insulation, move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice, or debris that obstructs access or visibility; Determine the presence or absence of any suspected adverse environmental condition or hazardous substance, including but not limited to mold, toxins, carcinogens, noise, contaminants in the building or in soil, water, and air; Determine the effectiveness of any system installed to control or remove suspected hazardous substances; contaminants in the building or in soil, water, and air; Determine the effectiveness of any system installed to control or remove suspected hazardous substances; Predict future condition, including but not limited to failure of components