A Notch Above Home Inspections

Website: http://www.reporthost.com/anotch
Email: jenzler@cableone.net
Phone: (208) 283-1115
675 Spyglass Way,  
Eagle, ID 83616
Inspector: Jim Enzler

                               

Sample large home
Client(s): Sample Large Home
Property address: Idaho 83616
Inspection date: Any month, 2007
This report published on 9/5/2007 2:52:40 PM MDT

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.[/b]

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major defectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor defectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Crawl space
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: Sample large home
Structures inspected: One single family home
Type of building: Single family 2 story home on a crawl space.
Age of building: Less than 1 year old.
Property owner's name:
Time started: 2:00 pm
Time finished: 8:30 pm
Inspection Fee:
Payment method: Invoiced, payment due on receipt of report
Present during inspection: Property owner(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Warm, 80 degrees
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: South
Main entrance faces: South
Foundation type: Crawlspace
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Security system, Irrigation system, Swimming pool, Central vacuum system, Water softener system, Built-in sound system


1) Repair/Replace - This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
2) Comment - Some wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by furniture and/or stored items. Some areas couldn't be evaluated.
3) Comment - This is a large, less than 1 year old, single family, two story home.
This home is approx. 6450 SF. The SF was calculated using the original floor plans, which shows the main first floor at 4075 SF, with 70.25 SF added to the laundry room (taken out of the garage). The upper floor shows 2124 SF, with 195.14 SF added to the upper right side bedroom closets, and the bonus room.

This home has 6 bedrooms and 4.5 baths. There is an upper level library, bonus/rec. room with kitchen, and a theater room. The master bath features a jetted tub, walk in 2 head tiled shower, and separate vanity sinks. There is a study with a stone tile floor, gas fireplace and a wood beam ceiling, with a bar sink/ref. separation room to the master bedroom that features a triple coffer ceiling with indirect lighting, and a 3 sided gas fireplace..
There is a gourmet kitchen with granite slab tops, and upgraded appliances.
There is a formal dining area, and an eating nook. There is a sunken hearth room with a gas fireplace and beam ceiling, and a living room with 2 story ceiling and windows, and an oversized gas fireplace with stone surround to the ceiling.

This house is loaded with upgrades and amenities, including:
- Colored, stamped concrete driveway with circle, RV parking, rear patio and pool deck.
- Water feature in front circle.
- Large in ground pool with retractible cover.
- Detached gazebo at pool deck.
- Raised concrete planter beds.
- 5 car garage.
- 3 gas furnaces.
- 3 air conditioners.
- 2 - 65 gallon HWH.
- 4 gas fireplaces.
- 2 - 200 amp electrical service.
- Curved stairway with wrought iron rail pickets.
- 10 ceiling fans.
- 2 rear covered patio ceiling fans.
- Fenced yard.
- Extensive wood work, cabinets, and buit-ins throughout.
- 10' ceilings on first floor, 9' on second floor.
- Upgraded bath fixtures, vanities, stone tile tops.
- Upgraded door hardware.
- 2" x 6" exterior wall construction.

This is a well built custom home, using quality materials and workmanship.

The major deficiencies found were substandard blown insualtion in the attic areas at the right side and center, and mold on the underside of the first floor sub floor. See ATITC and CRAWL SPACE sections.
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame - 2" x 6" exterior walls
Wall covering: Stucco at sides, rear and part of the front of the house, Stone veneer at the front left side and full height at the front right side. Front wainscot stone veneer with stucco above
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core wood at garage to house door, 2 Sliding glass wood framed, and one vinyl frame at upper right rear, Wood panel-double at front door, Glass panel at front study.
4) Safety, Maintain - One or more hornet, bee and/or wasp nests were found.
- At the front garage roof peak.
- At the front entry roof peak.
- At the rear upper balcony roof ( at the right side).
These can pose a safety hazard. Nest(s) should be removed as necessary.

Photo 15  
Bees nest at front right. 1 of 3.

Photo 38  
Remove bees nest at roof peak.

5) Repair/Maintain, Evaluate - Cracks, deterioration and/or damage were found in one or more areas of the stucco siding.
- Minor cracking at the right aside and left side at the rear master bedroom patio door at the bottom.
- There is a crack at the top of the knee wall at the upper right rear balcony. Repair. The stucco is also loose at this area and needs to be pulled off and repaired.
- Repair the stucco where the railings for the rear upper balcony were moved. Repairs are needed at eight places.
A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs to stucco siding as necessary.

Photo 42  
Minor cracks in stucco at master bedroom patio door

Photo 43  
Minor cracks in stucco at master bedroom patio door both sides

Photo 92  
Remove loose stucco and repair at upper rear balcony knee wall

Photo 93  
repair knee wall stucco at upper right rear balcony

Photo 94  
Repair eight areas of stucco where rear upper balcony railing was moved

Photo 95  
Damaged stucco from moving upper balcony rail

Photo 96  
Damaged stucco from moving balcony railing.

Photo 97  
Damaged stucco from moving balcony railing.

6) Repair/Maintain - One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation.
- Two at the left side at the crawl space vent. No concern.
- One at the rear. This can be seen from the crawl space only.
These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.

    Photo 29  
    Minor crack in left side foundation at crawl space vent corner.

    Photo 150  
    Crack in footing below left side crack in foundation wall.

    7) Repair/Maintain - Three bottom attachment screws are loose at the upper right rear balcony railing.

    Photo 122  
    Bottom bolt in rear balcony railing is loose. One of three

    Photo 123  
    Bottom bolt in rear balcony railing is loose. One of three

    8) Maintain, Comment - Minor cracks were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections.
    - At the rear patio.
    - Seal the gap at the rear patio steps where it meets the patio slab.
    However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracks sealed.

    Photo 34  
    Minor crack in rear concrete patio.

    Photo 44  
    Recommend seal crack at rear patio steps

    9) Maintain - The exterior finish in some areas is failing or in need of touch-up.
    -Paint the fascia corners at two places above the front garage. There is stucco on the fascia.
    A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint areas as needed and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 39  
    Paint over stucco stains on fascia board above garage.

    Photo 40  
    Paint over stucco stains on fascia board above garage.

    10) Evaluate - The rear right upper balcony right side rail is out of plumb. The bottom right screw is installed approximately 2" out of line.

    Photo 138  
    Right side railing of upper real balcony is out of plumb. Bottom right rail is set wrong.
     

    11) Evaluate - Note: the railing at the upper right rear balcony is 12' long and should be secured properly. Recommend add a bracket with bolts at the ends or use longer bolts to make the rail more secure.

    Photo 54  
    Upper right rear balcony.
     

    12) Comment - Minor cracks were found in the driveway.
    - At the front of the garage.
    - At the RV parking at the right side at the back by the house.
    However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracks sealed.

    Photo 18  
    Crack in RV parking concrete driveway at left rear near house.

    Photo 31  
    Minor cracks in driveway at garage.

    Photo 32  
    Minor cracks in driveway at garage.
     

    13) Comment - Views of exterior drainage. The drainage systems is designed to be effective in preventing water from accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in the crawl space.

    Photo 30  
    Downspout chain empties into a yard drain. Drainage around this home has been well designed with drains, underground pipes, drain seepage holes, etc.

    Photo 33  
    Downspout chain empties into a yard drain. Drainage around this home has been well designed with drains, underground pipes, drain seepage holes, etc.

    Photo 36  
    Downspout chain empties into a yard drain. Drainage around this home has been well designed with drains, underground pipes, drain seepage holes, etc.

    Photo 41  
    Downspout drains into underground pipe.

    14) Comment -

    Photo 35  
    Gas stub at rear patio for BBQ.
     

    15) Comment -

    Photo 55  
    View of swimming pool from upper rear balcony.
     
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Cross gable, Hipped
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles - 25 to 30 year architectural shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 1 year
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum with some downspout chains
    Roof ventilation: Evaluate: 5 power fans is the only source of attic ventilation.. There is no cross ventilation, such as gable end louvers, or soffit vents. The 5 power fans appear to be effective in ventilating the attic when operating. They should be monitored frequently to ensure that they are working, and that the fan motors don't need replacing, as they can wear out.
    The question arises as to whether there is adequate ventilation in the cooler months when the thermostatically controlled fans are not operating. Also, the concern arises whether the attic fans are pulling conditioned air from the home, rather than outside air from cross ventilation soffit and/or gable end vents.

    The architect who designed this home should be consulted regarding these questions, since the original design of soffit vents every 8', roof vents every 8', and 2' gable end louvers, as indicated on the plans, was replaced with the 5 powered fans.

    16) Repair/Maintain, Evaluate - Roofing nails and/or staples in one or more areas have loosened or backed out.
    - There is a popped nail at the front of the right side chimney.
    Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as reseating nails and applying sealant. Recommend seal all exposed roof nail heads and/or staples with polyurethane roof cement caulk.

    Photo 101  
    Set roof nail head popped up at right side. Seal with polyurethane roof cement sealant.
     

    17) Repair/Maintain - A screw is missing in the gutter hanger at the right rear by the chimney. Replace to ensure proper slope and function of gutter.
    18) Repair/Maintain - Roofing nails in one or more areas are exposed. Leaks may occur as a result. Recommend seal all exposed roof nail heads at the top rows of shingles at the upper walls, at the chimney and at the ridge caps ends.

    Photo 98  
    Seal all exposed roof nail heads with polyurethane roof cement sealant.

    Photo 100  
    Seal all exposed roof nail heads with polyurethane roof cement sealant.

    Photo 102  
    Seal all exposed roof nail heads with polyurethane roof cement sealant.

    Photo 108  
    Seal all exposed roof nail heads with polyurethane roof cement sealant.

    Photo 109  
    Seal all exposed roof nail heads with polyurethane roof cement sealant. Repair torn ridge cap shingle

    Photo 111  

    Photo 112  

    Photo 114  
    Seal all exposed roof nail heads with polyurethane roof cement sealant.

    19) Maintain - Keep the roof valley at the upper right rear balcony free of leaves and debris.

    Photo 99  
    Keep valley free of leaves and debris at right rear roof at rear balcony.
     

    20) Evaluate, Comment - Note: recommend verify with the architect that the five power fans provide adequate ventilation. There is no exterior cross ventilation, ie. soffit vents or gable end louvers.

    Evaluate: 5 power fans is the only source of attic ventilation.. There is no cross ventilation, such as gable end louvers, or soffit vents. The 5 power fans appear to be effective in ventilating the attic when operating. They should be monitored frequently to ensure that they are working, and that the fan motors don't need replacing, as they can wear out.
    The question arises as to whether there is adequate ventilation in the cooler months when the thermostatically controlled fans are not operating. Also, the concern arises whether the attic fans are pulling conditioned air from the home, rather than outside air from cross ventilation soffit and/or gable end vents.

    The architect who designed this home should be consulted regarding these questions, since the original design of soffit vents every 8', roof vents every 8', and 2' gable end louvers, as indicated on the plans, was replaced with the 5 powered fans.

    Photo 37  
    Stained tongue and groove wood soffit. There are no soffit vents.

    Photo 103  
    View of three of the five powered attic fans.

    Photo 113  
     

    21) Comment - View of roof.

    Photo 104  
    View of roof.

    Photo 105  
    View of roof.

    Photo 106  
    View of roof and attic fan.

    Photo 107  
    View of front roof.

    Photo 119  
     

    22) Comment - Some areas of the roof shingles are discolored. This is apparently from the stucco, especially at the right rear roof at the upper rear balcony. It is also at the front right under the roof eave.

    Photo 120  
    Right rear roof shingles are stained from stucco material

    Photo 121  
    Right rear roof shingles are stained from stucco material

    Photo 146  
    Discolored shingles on front right from stucco material.
     
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    23) Safety, Comment - There is a protective metal post at the front of the furnace/water heaters. This is to protect them from damage from vehicles. Warning: be aware of the gas pipes for the furnaces and water heaters at the rear garage right corner and do not bump or damage the post/barrier with a vehicle.

    Photo 143  
    Garage gas lines at appliances are protected by metal posts but need to be careful not to bump with vehicles.
     

    24) Comment - View of garages. One single car and 2 double.

    Photo 86  
    Garage.

    Photo 87  
    Single car garage.

    Photo 88  
    Garage.
     
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Partially traversed - There are three accesses to the attic: attic at left side at the master bedroom closet; at the right front bedroom closet; and at the upper right front sewing/bedroom closet. There is no access to the front right over the theater and bonus rec. room.
    Roof structure type: Trusses
    Ceiling structure: Trusses
    Insulation material: Cellulose loose fill
    Insulation depth: 3" to 8" and some 11"
    Insulation estimated R value: R - 10.5 to R-38--varies, but much of the attic areas over the right side is less than the standard.
    25) Repair/Replace - The ceiling insulation's R rating is significantly less than what's recommended for this area.
    - The depth of the insulation varies in much of the attic. The insulation over the master bedroom suite is okay. It is substandard over the upper level, over the right side lower bedrooms and over the rest of the house, accessed by the upper bedroom/sewing room closet.
    Recommend having a qualified contractor install additional insulation as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency.

    Photo 126  
    Attic insulation is sub standard at lower right side of attic. 8"- should be 11"

    Photo 128  
    Attic insulation is sub standard at lower right side of attic. 4"- should be 11"

    Photo 129  
    Attic insulation is sub standard at lower right side of attic. 3"- should be 11"

    Photo 130  
    Attic insulation is sub standard at lower right side of attic. 6"- should be 11"

    Photo 132  
    Attic insulation is sub standard at upper right side of attic. 8"- should be 11"

    Photo 133  
    Attic insulation is sub standard at upper right side of attic.5"- should be 11"

    Photo 134  
    Attic insulation is sub standard at upper right side of attic. 8"- should be 11"

    Photo 136  
    Attic over left side master bedroom. Insulation is OK

    26) Comment - View of attic.

    Photo 124  

    Photo 125  
    Sleeve at gas B-vent in attic to keep insulation from contact. Good!

    Photo 127  
    View of attic.

    Photo 137  
    View of attic.

    Photo 139  

    Photo 140  

    Photo 141  

    Photo 142  
    View of attic.

    27) Comment - Ventilation of the attic is provided by five fans. All fans are working and are set to 110 degrees. Note: recommend consult with architect to verify that ventilation is adequate for this home. Also, monitor and maintain the fans in working order.

    Photo 135  
    One of five attic fans. All are working and are set at 110 degrees.
     
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Underground
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200 - Two 200 amp panels
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: At the panel at the front of the garage.
    Location of sub panels: At the master bedroom suite mechanical room closet
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel. There is a disconnect next to the garage panel for the subpanel at the left side mechanical room closet panel. the garage panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 1 year
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): 65
    Manufacturer: Bradford White
    Model: There are two water heaters, both located in the garage: 1: Model # MIXR65T6BN, Serial # CF7909628. #2: Model # MIXR65T6BN, Serial # CF7909640. Both are 65 gallons
    Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): over 120 degrees
    28) Safety, Minor defect - The hot water temperature is greater than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of scalding. The thermostat should be adjusted so the water temperature doesn't exceed 120 degrees. For more information on scalding dangers, visit http://www.tap-water-burn.com/
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 1 year
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
    Distribution system: Flexible ducts
    Manufacturer: Tempstar
    Model: There are three furnaces: 1. Tempstar Model # N9MP2100J20C1, located in the garage. 2. Tempstar Model # N9MP2075812C1, located in the master bedroom. 3. Located in the upper right side closet off the bonus rec. room. Model # not visible.
    There are three air conditioners: 1: Model # TCA048AKC4, Serial # E053715440, Right side small a/c. 2. Model # E061523525, Serial # N2A360AKA200, Right side larger. 3. Model # NAC036AKC3, Serial # E053849224, Left side.

    Filter location: In return air duct above furnace for furnace in the garage and master bedroom suite left side mechanical room., In return air duct below furnace for #3 furnace at upper right furnace room.
    Last service date: N/A
    29) Safety, Maintain - Recommend that a qualified heating and cooling technician inspect the heat exchanger and perform a Carbon Monoxide test when it's serviced.
    30) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more sections of flex duct are sagging excessively.
    - The flex duct is loose and sagging from a broken strap at the front right in the crawl space.
    Most manufacturers, and the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association (SMACNA) recommend that this type of duct sag no more than 1/2" per foot between supports. A qualified heating/cooling contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 181  
    Flex duct strap has come loose at front right crawlspace. Duct sagging.
     

    31) Maintain - A qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system annually in the future. For more information visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
    32) Maintain - The filter(s) for the heating/cooling system should be checked monthly and replaced or washed as necessary.

    Filter size: # 1 and # 3: 20" x 25" x 5". # 2: 16" x 25" x 5"

    33) Comment -

    Photo 144  
    2 hot water heaters and furnace in garage.
     
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): Good
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Not found
    Location of main fuel shut-off: At gas meter at the front right side of the house
    Visible fuel storage systems: N/A
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Polyethylene, Black poly
    Supply pipe material: Polyethylene, PEX
    Vent pipe material: Plastic, White PVC
    Drain pipe material: Plastic, White PVC
    Waste pipe material: Plastic, White PVC
    34) Repair/Replace - The upper laundry room/mechanical room has no washing machine at this time. If one was installed, it would be over a finished living space and has no catch pan or drain installed.
    - At the upper right mechanical room.
    These are not commonly installed, but they are recommended to prevent water damage to finished interior spaces below if or when the washing machine leaks, overflows or is drained. Recommend having a qualified contractor install both a catch pan and drain.

    Photo 131  
    Washer dryer area in upper right side closet will need a overflow pan and drain if washer is installed.
     

    35) Comment - View of lower level laundry room.

    Photo 84  
    Laundry room.

    Photo 85  
    Laundry room.

    36) Comment -

    Photo 145  
    Central vacuum motor, and water softener.
     
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Metal prefabricated - There are four gas fireplaces
    Chimney type: Metal
    37) Comment - One or more gas fireplaces and/or stoves did not respond when the controls were operated.
    - The fireplace in the master bedroom did not respond. It was turned off.
    This may be due to the pilot light being turned off, the gas supply being turned off, or any number of other reasons. As a result, these appliances were not fully evaluated. As per the Standards of Practice for both the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI) and the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) the inspector does not operate gas shut off valves or light pilot lights during inspections. Recommend consulting with the property owner(s) as to how the fireplace(s) and/or stove(s) operate, and/or having a gas appliance contractor evaluate and repair if necessary.

    38) Comment -

    Photo 73  
    Oversized living room fireplace.
     

    39) Comment -

    Photo 110  
    Chimney with metal flue pipe for study gas fireplace.
     
     
    Crawl space Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Floor structure above: Engineered wood joists first floor 10" TJI, 24 " o.c. (some are 16" o.c.) with 7/8" osb sub floor; Upper level floor is 11-7/8" TJI, 16" o.c. with 3/4" osb subfloor
    Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt, 6" , R-19 at the floor above
    Pier or support post material: Wood, Bearing wall
    Floor structure above: Engineered wood joists,
    Vapor barrier present: Yes
    40) Major defect, Evaluate, Monitor - Mold is present on the underside of most of the subfloor. It is likely from the construction phase of the house. Recommend that this be evaluated and treated by a professional company such as ServPro.

    It is likely that the professional evaluation by a reliable company specializing in mold detection, testing and remediation, will determine that the insulation on the first floor above the crawl space needs be removed and replaced, after treating the mold on the underside of the sub floor. This involves removal of the mold spores, and treating with a biocide, and a treatment that guarantees and ensures that mold will not return.. There are programs and treatments that guarantee effective removal and ensures no return for 30 years.

    The same company should be able to ensure that there is no mold present elsewhere, such as in the second floor framing and sub floor.

    Note:
    This crawl space is dry and appears to be free of water infiltration problems.
    The mold on the bottom of the sub floor apparently happened when the house was under construction, and was wet from snow/rains before the roof was on and dry papered. The mold observed appears to be inactive, as there is no source of moisture for it to grow. That being said, the mold should still be completely removed and treated, as it could rapidly multiply if any water was introduced via a leak from plumbing above, or any other source.

    The fact that there is mold present should not be a concern as long as it is removed and treated by a professional company, who will guarantee the results of the removal and treatment. The end result actually is better, because the treatment prevents future mold. Some new homes now offer this mold treatment, protection, and guarantee as part of the sales and marketing package.

    Photo 161  
    Mold on underside of sub floor.

    Photo 162  
    There is mold on the bottom side of the first floor sub floor in the majority of the crawl space. It appears that the mold is not active, and is likely from the first floor framing getting wet during construction.

    Photo 163  
    Mold on underside of subfloor.

    Photo 164  
    Mold on underside of subfloor.

    Photo 165  
    Mold on underside of subfloor.

    Photo 166  
    Mold on underside of subfloor.

    Photo 167  

    Photo 168  
    Mold on underside of subfloor.

    Photo 169  

    Photo 170  

    Photo 172  
    There is mold on the bottom side of the first floor subfloor in the majority of the crawl space. It appears that the mold is not active, and is likely from the first floor framing getting wet during construction.

    Photo 173  
    Mold on underside of subfloor.

    Photo 174  

    Photo 175  
    There is mold on the bottom side of the first floor sub floor in the majority of the crawl space. It appears that the mold is not active, and is likely from the first floor framing getting wet during construction.

    Photo 178  

    Photo 179  

    Photo 180  
    There is mold on the bottom side of the first floor subfloor in the majority of the crawl space. It appears that the mold is not active, and is likely from the first floor framing getting wet during construction.
     

    41) Repair/Replace - The vapor barrier needs repair. Exposed soil was found in some areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary so no exposed soil exists. Standard building practices require the following:

  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

    Better building practices require that:

  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.
    42) Repair/Replace - Insulation under the floor in the crawlspace has fallen down.
    - Under the master bathroom area.
    A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary to restore the insulation to its original rating.

    Photo 154  
    Replace insulation under master bath

    Photo 155  
    Insulation under master bath tub has falling out.

    Photo 160  
    Replace fallen insulation under master bath
     

    43) Repair/Replace - Some studs at the stem wall have been knocked out to enable access in the crawl space. These should be replaced properly.

    Photo 177  
    Several wood studs in stem wall have been knocked out for easier access.
     

    44) Repair/Maintain - The strap is loose on the waste pipe at the front center of the crawl space. Secure properly.

    Photo 176  
    Strap for waste pipe is loose at front center of crawl space.
     

    45) Minor defect - Cellulose-based debris such as wood scraps, form wood, cardboard and/or paper were found in crawl space.
    - Remove the plywood in the crawl space.
    All cellulose-based debris should be removed to avoid attracting wood destroying insects.

    Photo 153  
    Clean wood scraps out of crawl space
     

    46) Comment - One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found.
    - There is non-energized wiring at the crawl space under the master bath..

    Photo 156  
    Electrical wire under master bath is not energized.
     

    47) Comment - View of cracks in the foundation as seen in the crawl space. Please refer to the item in the EXTERIOR SECTION of this report for comments.

    Photo 150  
    Crack in footing below left side crack in foundation wall.

    Photo 157  

    Photo 158  
    Minor crack in left side foundation

    Photo 159  

    Photo 171  
    Minor crack in left side foundation
     

    48) Comment - View of crawl space. It looks clean and dry.

    Photo 147  
    View of crawl space.

    Photo 148  
    Crawl space is dry and clean-no indication of previous water infiltration.

    Photo 149  
    Walls are clean and dry.

    Photo 151  
    Pony wall.

    Photo 152  
    View of crawl space.
     
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    49) Repair/Maintain, Evaluate - The under-sink food disposal is jammed.
    - At the upper bonus room kitchen sink. It hums.
    A qualified plumber or contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the food disposal as necessary.

    50) Comment - Kitchen views.

    Photo 48  
    Mini kitchen (no range) in upper bonus/rec. room.

    Photo 77  
    Eating area.

    Photo 78  
    Kitchen.

    Photo 79  
    Kitchen.

    Photo 89  
    Kitchen.

    Photo 90  
    Kitchen.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    51) Repair/Maintain, Evaluate - The master bathroom jetted tub left side light on the control appears to be out. It is hard to read the display.
    52) Repair/Maintain - The lower right bathroom commode room pocket door won't lock Adjust or repair.
    53) Comment - Bathroom views.

    Photo 65  
    Master bath.

    Photo 67  
    Master bath.

    Photo 68  
    Dual heads in master bath walk-in tiled shower.

    Photo 69  
    Jetted tub in master bath.

    Photo 70  
    Master bath ceiling.

    Photo 76  
    Lower level 1/2 bath.
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    54) Repair/Replace - The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated.
    - There is an air gap at the front entry door at the bottom center. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

    Photo 91  
    Air gap at bottom of front entry door
     

    55) Comment - Interior views.

    Photo 46  
    Theater room above garage.

    Photo 47  
    Bonus room/rec. room.

    Photo 49  
    Upper right bedroom/sewing room with play fort.

    Photo 50  
    Upper level library with rail overlooking living room.

    Photo 51  
    Upper level library with rail overlooking living room.

    Photo 52  
    View of oversized gas fireplace with full dry stacked stone surround.

    Photo 53  
    Upper right rear bedroom.

    Photo 56  
    Upper front bedroom is used as an exercise room.

    Photo 57  
    Full height rear windows in living room.

    Photo 58  
    View of foyer from upper floor.

    Photo 59  

    Photo 60  
    Front entry doors.

    Photo 61  
    Office/study.

    Photo 62  
    Lower hall.

    Photo 63  
    Master bedroom with 3 sided gas fireplace.

    Photo 64  
    Office/study.

    Photo 66  
    Master bedroom closet.

    Photo 71  
    Living room/dining room wall.

    Photo 72  
    Upper level railing.

    Photo 74  
    Foyer.

    Photo 75  
    Formal dining room.

    Photo 80  
    Hearth room.

    Photo 81  
    Hearth room.

    Photo 82  
    Lower right bedroom.

    Photo 83  
    Lower hallway.
     

     
    The Parties Understood and Agreed as follows:

    1. INSPECTOR GUARANTEES to perform a visual inspection of the home and to provide CLIENT with a written inspection report identifying the defects that INSPECTOR both observed and deemed material. INSPECTOR may offer comments as a courtesy, but these comments will not comprise the bargained-for report. The report is only supplementary to the sellers disclosure.

    2. INSPECTOR agrees to perform the inspection in accordance to the current Standards of Practice of the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors posted at http://www.nachi.org/sop.htm.

    3. CLIENT understands that the inspection will be performed in accordance to the aforementioned Standards, which contain certain limitations, exceptions, and exclusions.

    4. The inspection and report are performed and prepared for the use of CLIENT, who gives INSPECTOR permission to discuss observations with real estate agents, owners, repair persons and other interested parties. INSPECTOR accepts no responsibility for use or misinterpretation by third parties.

    5. INSPECTOR does not perform engineering, architectural, plumbing, or any other job function requiring an occupational license in the jurisdiction where the inspection is taking place, unless the inspector holds a valid occupational license, in which case he/she may inform the CLIENT that he/she is so licensed, and is therefore qualified to go beyond this basic home inspection, and for additional fee, perform additional inspections beyond those within the scope of the basic home inspection.

    6. In the event of a claim against INSPECTOR, CLIENT agrees to supply INSPECTOR with the following: (1) Written notification of adverse conditions within 14 days of discovery, and (2) Access to the premises. Failure to comply with the above conditions will release INSPECTOR and its agents from any and all obligations.

    7. HOLD HARMLESS AGREEMENT: CLIENT agrees to hold any and all real estate agents involved in the purchase of the property to be inspected harmless and keep them exonerated from all loss, damage, liability or expense occasioned or claimed by reasons of acts or neglects of the INSPECTOR or his employees or visitors or of independent contractors engaged or paid by INSPECTOR for the purpose of inspecting the subject home.

    8. In the event that CLIENT fails to prove any adverse claims against INSPECTOR in a court of law, then the CLIENT will pay all legal costs, expenses and fees of INSPECTOR in defending said claims.

    9. If any provision of this Agreement is declared invalid or unenforceable by any court, the remaining provisions will remain in effect. This agreement represents the entire agreement between the parties. No change or modification shall be enforceable against any party unless such change or modification is in writing and signed by the parties. This Agreement shall be binding upon and enforceable by the parties and their heirs, executors, administrators, successors and assigns. CLIENT shall have no cause of action against INSPECTOR after one year after from the date of the inspection.

    10. Payment, by CLIENT or CLIENTs representative, is due in full at the inspection site, upon completion of the on-site inspection. The CLIENT will pay all legal and time expenses incurred in collecting due payments.




    "A Home Inspection is a Non-Invasive Visual Examination of a Residential Dwelling. Components may include any combination of mechanical, structural, electrical, plumbing, or other essential systems or portions of the home, as identified and agreed to by the Client and Inspector, such as: Roof ~ Exterior ~ Basement / Foundation ~ Heating Cooling ~ Plumbing ~ Electrical ~ Fireplace ~ Attic & Insulation ~ Doors, Windows & Interior."
    From NACHI Standards of Practice


    "There are conditions that require the removal of some part of the building to observe, measure, or test otherwise concealed construction. Such intrusive inspections require some demolition and should be performed only with the permission of the owner and by experienced, qualified mechanics."
    -From the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's
    Residential Rehabilitation Inspection Guide, 2000


    - HOMES BEING INSPECTED DO NOT "PASS" OR "FAIL" -
    A home inspector merely discloses his or her findings and reports those findings to the client. Everyone involved graduates to a state of higher learning, and the client can now make better informed decisions about the purchase of a home and its future needs of upkeep and repair.

    Four key areas of most home/building inspections cover the exterior, the basement or crawlspace areas, the attic or crawlspace areas and the living areas. Inspectors typically will spend sufficient time in all of these areas to visually look for a host of red flags, tell-tale clues and signs or defects and deficiencies.

    The inspected areas of a home/building will consist of all of the major visible and accessible electro-mechanical systems as well as the major visible and accessible structural systems and components of a building as they appeared and functioned at the time and date of the inspection.

    Inspectors typically do not provide warranties or guaranties with their inspections and reports. Buyers should therefore not rely on the inspection as any form of insurance policy against any latent, hidden, concealed or future defects and deficiencies.

    The following are also some key items that buyers should remember and consider when reviewing their inspection reports:
    * Inspections are not code compliance evaluations.
    * Inspection reports are not structural engineering reports.
    * Systems and components that are off during the inspection are not tested or reactivated.
    * Buyers should consult with and ask questions of owners and their representatives.
    * Roof inspections and their components are typically done from eaves or street level with binoculars.
    * Reports are confidential and are meant exclusively for buyers, and not brokers or owners.
    * Inspectors typically will not find each and every defect in a building, hence buyers should anticipate future typical defects and deficiencies.
    * Further evaluation by specialists is recommended for any areas showing defects/deficiencies.
    * A final walk-through inspection should be carried out the day before closing by the new owners to double check the condition of the building.



    Limitations:
    I. An inspection is not technically exhaustive.
    II. An inspection will not identify concealed or latent defects.
    III. An inspection will not deal with aesthetic concerns or what could be deemed matters of taste, cosmetic, etc.
    IV. An inspection will not determine the suitability of the property for any use.
    V. An inspection does not determine the market value of the property or its marketability.
    VI. An inspection does not determine the advisability or inadvisability of the purchase of the inspected property.
    VII. An inspection does not determine the life expectancy of the property or any components or systems therein.
    VIII. An inspection does not include items not permanently installed.
    IX. These Standards of Practice apply only to homes with four or fewer dwelling units.

    Exclusions:
    I. The inspectors are not required to determine:
    A. Property boundary lines or encroachments.
    B. The condition of any component or system that is not readily accessible.
    C. The service life expectancy of any component or system.
    D. The size, capacity, BTU, performance, or efficiency of any component or system.
    E. The cause or reason of any condition.
    F. The cause for the need of repair or replacement of any system or component.
    G. Future conditions.
    H. The compliance with codes or regulations.
    I. The presence of evidence of rodents, animals or insects.
    J. The presence of mold, mildew or fungus.
    K. The presence of air-borne hazards.
    L. The presence of birds.
    M. The presence of other flora or fauna.
    N. The air quality.
    O. The existence of asbestos.
    P. The existence of environmental hazards.
    Q. The existence of electro-magnetic fields.
    R. The presence of hazardous materials including, but not limited to, the presence of lead in paint.
    S. Any hazardous waste conditions.
    T. Any manufacturer recalls or conformance with manufacturer installation or any information included in the consumer protection bulletin.
    U. Operating costs of systems.
    V. Replacement or repair cost estimates.
    W. The acoustical properties of any systems.
    X. Estimates of how much it will cost to run any given system.

    II. The inspectors are not required to operate:
    A. Any system that is shut down.
    B. Any system that does not function properly.
    C. Or evaluate low voltage electrical systems such as, but not limited to:
    1. Phone lines.
    2. Cable lines.
    3. Antennae.
    4. Lights.
    5. Remote controls.
    D. Any system that does not turn on with the use of normal operating controls.
    E. Any shut off valve.
    F. Any electrical disconnect or over current protection devices.
    G. Any alarm systems.
    H. Moisture meters, gas detectors or similar equipment.



    III. The inspectors are not required to:

    A. Move any personal items or other obstructions,
    such as, but not limited to:

    1. Throw rugs.
    2. Furniture.
    3. Floor or wall coverings.
    4. Ceiling tiles
    5. Window coverings.
    6. Equipment.
    7. Plants.
    8. Ice.
    9. Debris.
    10. Snow.
    11. Water.
    12. Dirt.
    13. Foliage.
    14. Pets

    B. Dismantle, open, or uncover any system or component.
    C. Enter or access any area which may, in the opinion of the inspector, to be unsafe or risk personal safety.
    D. Enter crawlspaces or other areas that are unsafe or not readily accessible.
    E. Inspect underground items such as, but not limited to, underground storage tanks or other indications of their presence, whether abandoned or actively used.
    F. Do anything which, in the inspector's opinion, is likely to be unsafe or dangerous to the inspector or others or damage property, such as, but not limited to, walking on roof surfaces, climbing ladders, entering attic spaces or negotiating with dogs.
    G. Inspect decorative items.
    H. Inspect common elements or areas in multi-unit housing.
    I. Inspect intercoms, speaker systems, radio-controlled, security devices or lawn irrigation systems.
    J. Offer guarantees or warranties.
    K. Offer or perform any engineering services.
    L. Offer or perform any trade or professional service other than home inspection.
    M. Research the history of the property, report on its potential for alteration, modification, extendibility, or its suitability for a specific or proposed use for occupancy.
    N. Determine the age of construction or installation of any system structure, or component of a building, or differentiate between original construction or subsequent additions, improvements, renovations or replacements thereto.
    O. Determine the insurability of a property.