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Allegiance Home Inspection LLC.

Website: http://www.allegiancehomeinspection.net
Email: Info@Allegiancehomeinspection.net
3377 Bethel Rd SE Ste. 107 
Port Orchard, WA 98366 

Inspector: Kyle Brose
WSDA Lic#88853, Struct. #1247
Office : (360) 900-9811

    

Property Inspection Report

Client(s):  Sample Report #1001
Property address:  1492 pleasant Ave N
Awesome, WA 98370
ICN# 10987BA004
Inspection date:  Wednesday, March 14, 2018

This report published on Monday, April 2, 2018 1:09:22 PM PDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a safety hazard
Concern typeCorrect/ReplaceRecommend correcting or replacing
Concern typeCorrect/MaintainRecommend correction and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeCommentFor your information

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at https://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Grounds
Exterior and Foundation
Roof
Garage
Electric
Water Heater
Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
Kitchen
Attic and Roof Structure
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
Interior, Doors and Windows
Crawl Space
Wood Destroying Organism Findings

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General Information
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For the ease of understanding this report, the front of the home faces: East
Time started: 1:40 pm
Time finished: 4:20 pm
Present during inspection: Client, Real Estate Agent, Family/Friends
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions during inspection: Dry (no rain)
Temperature during inspection: Warm
Ground condition: Dry
Recent weather: Dry (no rain)
Overnight temperature: Cold
Age of main building: 1956
Source for main building age: Municipal records or property listing
Occupied: No

1) Structures built prior to the mid 1980s may contain lead and/or asbestos. Lead is commonly found in paint and in some plumbing components. The EPA does not recognize newer coats of paint as encapsulating older coats of lead-based paint. Asbestos is commonly found in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Laws were passed in 1978 to prohibit usage of lead and asbestos, but stocks of materials containing these substances remained in use for a number of years thereafter. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is beyond the scope of this inspection. Any mention of these materials in this report is made as a courtesy only, and meant to refer the client to a specialist. Consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement specialists for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?EPA
http://www.reporthost.com/?CPSC
http://www.reporthost.com/?CDC

2) It is recommended that homeowner or qualified person spray a pest control product such as Ortho/Raid bug killer around the exterior perimeter of their home 3 times per year. The best time for application is the first warm week of Spring, Summer and Fall.

3) Wood Destroying Organisms: This report includes a structural pest inspection embedded within the report. All observations in this report that note being a conducive condition are a part of a Washington State Pest Inspection. Allegiance Home Inspection LLC, employs Kyle Brose, Licensed Structural Pest Inspector #88853. Please note that most WDO observations are related to high moisture conditions that could be conducive to mold-like substances. Allegiance Home Inspection LLC recommends conducting an indoor air quality test and possibly consulting with an industrial hygienist if concerned with mold. Pest Inspection Standards in Washington State - WAC 16-228-2045 - REQUIRES THAT A DIAGRAM / DRAWING BE PREPARED FOR WOOD DESTROYING ORGANISM (WDO) REPORTS. IF THE PHOTOS AND DESCRIPTIONS IN THIS REPORT ARE INADEQUATE, A DRAWING IS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST, for the agreed upon fee.

Grounds
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Limitations: Unless specifically included in the inspection, the following items and any related equipment, controls, electric systems and/or plumbing systems are excluded from this inspection: detached buildings or structures; fences and gates; retaining walls; underground drainage systems, catch basins or concealed sump pumps, concealed or underground drainage pipes; swimming pools and related safety equipment, spas, hot tubs or saunas; whether deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight; trees, landscaping, properties of soil, soil stability, erosion and erosion control; ponds, water features, irrigation or yard sprinkler systems; sport courts, playground, recreation or leisure equipment; areas below the exterior structures with less than 3 feet of vertical clearance; invisible fencing; sea walls, docks and boathouses; retractable awnings. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only.
Site profile: Minor slope
Driveway material: Unpaved, dirt
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior stair material: Concrete

4) The grading sloped down towards perimeters of the home. This can result in water accumulating around the foundation or underneath the home. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from buildings with a slope of at least 1 inch per horizontal foot for at least 6 feet out from buildings. Where this is not feasible consider alternative methods.

5) Minor deterioration (e.g. cracks, holes, settlement, heaving) was found in sidewalks or patios, but no trip hazards were found. The client may wish to have corrections made, primarily for cosmetic reasons.

Exterior and Foundation
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Limitations: The inspector performs a visual inspection of accessible components or systems at the exterior. Items excluded from this inspection include below-grade foundation walls and footings; foundations, exterior surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris; wall structures obscured by coverings such as siding or trim. Some items such as siding, trim, soffits, vents and windows are often high off the ground, and may be viewed using binoculars from the ground or from a ladder. This may limit a full evaluation. Regarding foundations, some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of seismic reinforcement.
Wall inspection method: Viewed from ground
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Vinyl, Wood trim
Apparent foundation type: Crawl space
Foundation/stem wall material: Poured in place concrete
Footing material (under foundation stem wall): Poured in place concrete

6) Some sections of siding and/or trim were melted. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install siding or trim as necessary.

Including at the northeast side of the home.
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Photo 6-1
 

7) The cantilevered section of the exterior on the north side of the home was sloping downed and appeared to have substandard support. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and make corrections as necessary.

8) One or more holes or gaps were found in siding or trim. Vermin, insects or water may enter the structure. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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9) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These didn't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitor them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including hydraulic cement, non-shrinking grout, resilient caulks and epoxy sealants.
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Photo 9-1
 

10) Caulk was missing in some areas. For example, at wall penetrations. Recommend that a qualified person renew or install caulk as necessary. Where gaps are wider than 1/4 inch, an appropriate material other than caulk should be used. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?CAULK
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Photo 10-1
 

Roof
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Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; solar roofing components. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on the roof surface material, nor guarantee that leaks have not occurred in the roof surface, skylights or roof penetrations in the past. Regarding roof leaks, only active leaks, visible evidence of possible sources of leaks, and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that leaks will not occur in the future. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. Regarding the roof drainage system, unless the inspection was conducted during and after prolonged periods of heavy rain, the inspector was unable to determine if gutters, downspouts and extensions performed adequately or were leak-free.
Roof inspection method: Traversed
Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Roof type: Gable
Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: One
Gutter and downspout material: Metal
Gutter and downspout installation: Full

11) Extensions such as splash blocks or drain pipes for one or more downspouts were missing. Water can accumulate around the building foundation or inside crawl spaces or basements as a result. Recommend that a qualified person install, replace or repair extensions as necessary so rainwater drains away from the structure.
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12) These images are general pictures of the homes roof covering.
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Photo 12-4

Garage
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Limitations: The inspector does not determine the adequacy of firewall ratings. Requirements for ventilation in garages vary between municipalities.
Type: Detached, Garage
Type of garage vehicle door: Sectional
Number of vehicle doors: 2
Apparent wall structure: Pole
Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground
Roof type: Gable
Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles

13) Fungal rot was found at one or more sections of siding or trim. Conducive conditions for rot should be corrected (e.g. wood-soil contact, reverse perimeter slope). Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.
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14) One or more garage vehicle doors were damaged or deteriorated. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair or replace door(s) as necessary.

15) Hardware such as brackets, hangers, rollers and/or fasteners on one or more garage vehicle doors was missing, loose and/or damaged. A qualified person should repair as necessary.

16) Minor cracks were found in the concrete slab floor. These are common and appeared to be only a cosmetic issue.

Electric
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, transfer switches, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low-voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific or anticipated needs, or if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, and does not install or change light bulbs. The inspector does not evaluate every wall switch or receptacle, but instead tests a representative number of them per various standards of practice. When furnishings, stored items or child-protective caps are present some receptacles are usually inaccessible and are not tested; these are excluded from this inspection. Receptacles that are not of standard 110 volt configuration, including 240-volt dryer receptacles, are not tested and are excluded. The functionality of, power source for and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms is not determined as part of this inspection. Upon taking occupancy, proper operating and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide alarms should be verified and batteries should be changed. These devices have a limited lifespan and should be replaced every 10 years. The inspector attempts to locate and evaluate all main and sub-panels. However, panels are often concealed. If panels are found after the inspection, a qualified electrician should evaluate and repair if necessary. The inspector attempts to determine the overall electrical service size, but such estimates are not guaranteed because the overall capacity may be diminished by lesser-rated components in the system. Any repairs recommended should be made by a licensed electrician.
Primary service type: Overhead
Number of service conductors: 2
Service voltage (volts): 120-240
Estimated service amperage: 200
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service entrance conductor material: Stranded aluminum
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200, Not applicable, no single main disconnect
Location of main service panel #A: Bedroom
Location of main service panel #B: Garage
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at bottom of main service panel B, Top bank of breakers in main service panel A(split bus)
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection present: Yes
Arc fault circuit interrupter (AFCI) protection present: No
Smoke alarms installed: Yes, but not tested
Carbon monoxide alarms installed: Yes, but not tested
Location of sub-panel #C: Coat closet

17) One or more clamps that secure the electric service's grounding electrode conductor(s) to a grounding rod were disconnected. Grounding may be substandard as a result and may be a safety hazard for shock. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair as necessary. For example, by tightening clamps.
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Photo 17-1
 

18) Electric receptacles (outlets) at the garage and/or exterior had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection, or the inspector was unable to determine if GFCI protection was present. If not GFCI-protected, receptacles in wet areas pose a potential safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and install GFCI protection as necessary and per standard building practices. General guidelines for GFCI-protected receptacles include the following locations:
  • Outdoors (since 1973)
  • Bathrooms (since 1975)
  • Garages (since 1978)
  • Kitchens (since 1987)
  • Crawl spaces and unfinished basements (since 1990)
  • Wet bar sinks (since 1993)
  • Laundry and utility sinks (since 2005)
For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?GFCI
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Photo 18-1
 

19) The electric service was configured so that more than six hand movements were necessary to turn off all power for the service. Six or fewer circuit breakers should be required to turn off all power to a residence. This is a potential safety concern during an emergency when the power needs to be turned off quickly. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices.
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Photo 19-1
 

20) Neutral wires were doubled or bundled together under the same lug on the neutral bus bar in panel(s). This is a potential safety hazard in the event that one of the circuits needs to be isolated during servicing. For one neutral to be disconnected, other neutrals from energized circuits sharing the same lug will be loosened. Power surges may result on the energized circuits and result in damage or fire. Also, multiple wires under the same lug may not be secure, resulting in loose wires, arcing, sparks and fire. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?DTNB
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Photo 20-1
Main panel A
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Photo 20-2
Sub panel C

21) One or more receptacles (outlets) were broken or damaged. This is a potential safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician replace such receptacles as necessary.

Including at the garage.
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Photo 21-1
 

22) One or more modern, 3-slot electric receptacles (outlets) were found with an open ground. This is a shock hazard when appliances that require a ground are used with these receptacles. Examples of such appliances include computers and related hardware, refrigerators, freezers, portable air conditioners, clothes washers, aquarium pumps, and electrically operated gardening tools. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair as necessary so all receptacles are grounded per standard building practices.


Including at the garage and southwest bedroom.
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Photo 22-1
 

23) A 3-slot receptacle (outlet) was installed for the clothes dryer. Most modern clothes dryers use both 120 and 240 volts (120 for timers and motors, and 240 for heating elements) and either require or are more safely installed with a 4-slot receptacle. With 3-conductor wiring, the ground wire rather than a neutral wire is used to carry the return current back for the 120 volt leg. The clothes dryer's metal frame can become energized if the neutral wire becomes loose at the receptacle or panel. While 3-wire clothes dryer circuits were allowed prior to 1996 and are commonly found, they are considered unsafe due to the risk of shock. Recommend that a qualified electrician convert this to a 4-wire circuit. Note that this may require installing a new circuit wire from the panel to the clothes dryer location.

24) Electric panel(s) were located in a closet. This is not a recommended location for electric panels. Recommend that a qualified electrician move the panel(s) or make corrections per standard building practices.

25) One or more cover plates for switches, receptacles (outlets) or junction boxes were missing or broken. Recommend that a qualified person install or replace cover plates where necessary.

Including at the garage and crawl space.
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Photo 25-2

26) Bushings were missing from where wires enter holes in panel(s). This is a potential safety hazard because the wiring insulation can be cut or abraded on the metal edge of the hole(s). Recommend that a qualified electrician install bushings where missing.

Noticed at main panel B
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Photo 26-1
 

27) One or more electric receptacles (outlets) had no power during the inspection. Recommend asking the property owner about this. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. If necessary, recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair.
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Photo 27-1
 

28) A "split bus" panel was installed as a main service panel. On such panels there is no single main disconnect switch to turn the power off. Instead, all breakers labeled "main" or "sub-main" (usually those on the upper half of the panel) must be turned off to turn all power off. These panels are common, but are no longer the standard. Recommend the client familiarize themselves with the operation of this panel and the procedure for turning all the power off in the event of an emergency. Consult with an electrician if necessary. Please see any other comments in this report related to the panel's legend.

29) These images are general pictures of the homes electrical system.
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Photo 29-2
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Photo 29-3
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Photo 29-4

Water Heater
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Limitations: Evaluation of and determining the adequacy or completeness of the following items are not included in this inspection: water recirculation pumps; solar water heating systems; Energy Smart or energy saver controls; hybrid water heater; catch pan drains. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on water heaters, does not determine if water heaters are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit or a shut-off valve to be operated.
Type: Tank
Energy source: Propane
Estimated age: 2018
Capacity (in gallons): 50
Temperature-pressure relief valve installed: Yes
Manufacturer: Rheem
Location of water heater: Laundry room
Hot water temperature tested: Yes

30) The water heater's earthquake straps or struts were substandard. For example, they may allow significant movement or use substandard fasteners. This is a potential safety hazard in the event of an earthquake due to the risk of the water heater tipping over, gas lines breaking if it's gas-fired, or electric wiring being damaged if powered by electricity. Leaks can also occur in water-supply pipes. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace existing earthquake reinforcement per standard building practices. Straps should typically be installed with one strap at the top third and one strap at the bottom third of the tank.
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31) The hot water temperature was greater than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of scalding. The thermostat should be adjusted so the water temperature doesn't exceed 120 degrees. If the water heater is powered by electricity, a qualified person should perform the adjustment, since covers that expose energized equipment normally need to be removed. For more information on scalding dangers, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SCALD
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Photo 31-1
 

32) No thermal expansion tank was installed at the water heater, and the plumbing system may be "closed" based on the possible installation of a backflow prevention device in the water supply system. In a closed system an expansion tank should be installed to allow room for water in the system to expand. Without one, the water heater's temperature-pressure relief valve can leak or become damaged, or toilets can "run" due to excess pressure overcoming the fill valve. Recommend that a qualified plumber install an expansion tank per standard building practices.

Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; solar, coal or wood-fired heat systems; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating or cooling system components, does not determine if heating or cooling systems are appropriately sized, does not test coolant pressure, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, a shut-off valve to be operated, a circuit breaker to be turned "on" or a serviceman's or oil emergency switch to be operated. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks. Condensation pans and drain lines may clog or leak at any time and should be monitored while in operation in the future. Where buildings contain furnishings or stored items, the inspector may not be able to verify that a heat source is present in all "liveable" rooms (e.g. bedrooms, kitchens and living/dining rooms).
General heating system type(s): Electric heaters
General heating distribution type(s): None, individual heaters
Electric heater type (not forced air): Wall mounted, with fan
Manufacturer of electric heaters (not forced air): Cadet

Kitchen
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: household appliances such as stoves, ovens, cook tops, ranges, warming ovens, griddles, broilers, dishwashers, trash compactors, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers, hot water dispensers and water filters; appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self and/or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances. The inspector does not note appliance manufacturers, models or serial numbers and does not determine if appliances are subject to recalls. Areas and components behind and obscured by appliances are inaccessible and excluded from this inspection.
Permanently installed kitchen appliances present during inspection: Range, Dishwasher, Under-sink food disposal
Range, cooktop or oven type: Propane

33) The range could tip forward. An anti-tip bracket may not be installed. This is a potential safety hazard since the range can tip forward when weight is applied to the open door. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free-standing ranges since 1985. Recommend installing an anti-tip bracket to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ATB

34) No high loop or air gap was visible for the dishwasher drain. A high loop is created by routing the drain line up to the bottom surface of the counter top above and securely fastening it to that surface. An air gap is a device that makes the drain line non-continuous. Both of these prevent waste-water backflow from entering the dishwasher, and possibly flooding out of the dishwasher if/when a siphon occurs. Some newer dishwashers have these devices built in. The client should try to determine if these devices are built in to this brand and model of dishwasher (e.g. review installation instructions). If not, or if this cannot be determined, then recommend that a qualified contractor install a high loop and air gap per standard building practices.

Attic and Roof Structure
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Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of the attic ventilation system. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high/low temperatures, high/low humidity, high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector is not a licensed engineer and does not determine the adequacy of roof structure components such as trusses, rafters or ceiling beams, or their spacing or sizing. Many areas near the lower sections of the attic are inaccessible and excluded.
Attic inspection method: Viewed from hatch(es)
Attic access points that were opened and viewed, traversed or partially traversed: A
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling joists
Ceiling insulation material: Not determined (inaccessible or obscured)
Roof ventilation type: Box vents (roof jacks), Enclosed soffit vents

35) One or more exhaust ducts (e.g. bathroom exhaust, clothes dryer) in an unconditioned space were not insulated. This can result in moisture forming inside the duct or "sweating" on the outside of the duct depending on the surrounding air temperature and the exhaust air temperature. Recommend that a qualified person install insulation on exhaust ducts per standard building practices (typically R-4 rating), or replace uninsulated ducts with insulated ducts.
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Photo 35-1
 

36) Attic spaces less than 30 inches in height may exist in this building, but had no visible access points. This is acceptable per standard building practices. However, these spaces were not inspected and are excluded from this inspection.

37) These images are general pictures of the homes attic space.
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Photo 37-2

38) The attic was finished with drywall. I was unable to fully evaluate the roof structure.

Plumbing / Fuel Systems
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: private/shared wells and related equipment; private sewage disposal systems; hot tubs or spas; main, side and lateral sewer lines; gray water systems; pressure boosting systems; trap primers; incinerating or composting toilets; fire suppression systems; water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems; plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks; backflow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determine the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks.
Water service: Public
Water pressure (psi): 88
Location of main water shut-off: Not determined (obscured, inaccessible or none found)
Service pipe material: Not determined (inaccessible or obscured)
Supply pipe material: Copper
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
Vent pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
Visible fuel storage systems: Above ground, propane tank
Location of main fuel shut-off valve: At propane tank

39) The water supply pressure was greater than 80 pounds per square inch (PSI). Pressures above 80 PSI may void warranties for some appliances such as water heaters or washing machines. Flexible supply lines to washing machines are likely to burst with higher pressures. 40-80 PSI is considered the normal range for water pressure in a home, and most plumbers recommend 50-60 PSI . Typically, the pressure cannot be regulated at the water meter. Recommend that a qualified plumber evaluate and make modifications to reduce the pressure to below 80 PSI . Installing a pressure reducing valve on the main service pipe is a common solution to this problem. If one exists, then it should be adjusted, repaired or replaced as necessary to maintain lower pressures. Note that installing a pressure reducing valve creates a "closed system," which may require installing an expansion tank at the water heater if one is not already installed.
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Photo 39-1
 

40) Water supply pipes in the crawl space were not insulated. Recommend insulating pipes per standard building practices to prevent them from freezing during cold weather, and for better energy efficiency with hot water supply pipes.
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41) One or more hose bibs (outside faucets) leaked when tested. When hose bibs leak while turned off, it's often caused by a worn valve seat or a loose bonnet. When hose bibs leak while turned on, it may be due to worn "packing" around the stem or a defective backflow prevention device. Recommend that a qualified plumber repair as necessary.
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Photo 41-1
 

42) Steel piping for the gas service located outside was significantly corroded. Gas leaks can result. Recommend evaluation by a qualified contractor to determine if piping needs replacing. If not, then a qualified person should prep and paint lines as necessary with a rust-preventative paint. Very corroded pipes should be replaced by a qualified contractor.
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Photo 42-1
 

43) Based on visible components or information provided to the inspector, this property appeared to have a private sewage disposal (septic) system. These are specialty systems and are excluded from this inspection. Comments in this report related to this system are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified specialist. Generally, septic tanks should be pumped and inspected every 3 years. Depending on the type of system and municipal regulations, inspection and maintenance may be required more frequently, often annually. Recommend the following:
  • Consult with the property owner about this system's maintenance and repair history
  • Review any documentation available for this system
  • Review inspection and maintenance requirements for this system
  • That a qualified specialist evaluate, perform maintenance and make repairs if necessary
For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?SEPTIC
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Photo 43-1
 

44) The inspector did not determine the location of the main water shut-off valve, or verify that a readily accessible shut-off valve in the building exists. Recommend consulting with the property owner to determine if a main shut-off valve exists, locating it yourself, or that a qualified plumber find it if necessary. If no readily accessible main shut-off valve is found in the building, then recommend that a qualified plumber install one so the water supply can be quickly turned off in the event of an emergency, such as when a supply pipe bursts.

45) One or more water shut-off valves were not labeled, and their function is unknown. Recommend consulting with the property owner to determine valves' functions, that you verify this yourself, or if necessary that a qualified plumber evaluate. Recommend labeling valves as necessary.

46) Based on the age of this structure, recommend that a qualified plumber inspect the waste lines using a video scope device to determine if they need repair or replacement. Property owners are usually responsible for repairs to the side sewer and publicly owned lateral lines. Such repairs can be expensive.

47) One or more hose bibs (outside faucets) were not evaluated due to their being winterized with covers. They are excluded from this inspection.

48) These images are general pictures of the homes plumbing components.
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Photo 48-3
Main fuel shut off.
 

Fireplaces, Stoves, Chimneys and Flues
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: coal stoves, gas logs, chimney flues (except where visible). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of drafting or sizing in fireplace and stove flues, and also does not determine if prefabricated or zero-clearance fireplaces are installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. The inspector does not perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, and does not light fires. The inspector provides a basic visual examination of a chimney and any associated wood burning device. The National Fire Protection Association has stated that an in-depth Level 2 chimney inspection should be part of every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Such an inspection may reveal defects that are not apparent to the home inspector who is a generalist.
Wood-burning fireplace type: Masonry
Fan or blower installed in wood-burning fireplace or stove: No
Gas fireplace or stove type: Metal pre-fab fireplace, Freestanding stove
Wood-burning chimney type: Masonry, with wood enclosure
Gas-fired flue type: Direct vent, B-vent

49) Terracotta flue tiles in one or more masonry chimney(s) were cracked or broken. This is a potential fire hazard because such cracks become wider when the chimney heats up and can allow exhaust gases to enter the building structure. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate, replace broken tiles and make other repairs as necessary.
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50) One or more wood-burning fireplaces or stoves were found at the property. When such devices are used, they should be professionally inspected and cleaned annually to prevent creosote build-up and to determine if repairs are needed. The National Fire Protection Association states that a "Level 2" chimney inspection should be performed with every sale or transfer of property with a wood-burning device. Recommend consulting with the property owner about recent and past servicing and repairs to all wood-burning devices and chimneys or flues at this property. Recommend that a qualified specialist evaluate all wood-burning devices and chimneys, and clean and repair as necessary. Note that if a wood stove insert is installed, it may need to be removed for such an evaluation. For more information, search for "chimney inspection" at:
http://www.reporthost.com/?CSIA
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51) Recommend that the client review all available documentation for gas-fired fireplaces and stoves. Depending on how they are operated (for routine heating versus ambiance), such appliances may need servicing annually or every few years. Consult with the property owner and/or a qualified specialist to determine if service is needed now.

52) Firebricks lining the wood fireplace were cracked, broken or missing. Recommend that a qualified person replace firebricks as necessary.
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53) The gas fireplace or stove was not fully evaluated because the pilot light was off. The inspector only operates normal controls (e.g. on/off switch or thermostat) and does not light pilot lights or operate gas shut-off valves. Recommend that the client review all documentation for such gas appliances and familiarize themselves with the lighting procedure. If necessary, a qualified specialist should assist in lighting such appliances, and make any needed repairs.

Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.
Bathroom and laundry ventilation type: Spot exhaust fans, with individual ducts
Gas supply for laundry equipment present: No
240 volt receptacle for laundry equipment present: Yes

54) The exhaust fan(s) was noisy or vibrated excessively. Recommend that a qualified person clean, repair or replace fans as necessary.

Noticed at the west bedroom

55) The laundry room didn't have an exhaust fan installed. Recommend that a qualified contractor install an exhaust fan to assist in removing excess humidity.

56) The laundry sink was loose or not securely attached to the wall or floor. Leaks may occur if plumbing supply or drain lines are moved. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

57) Caulk around the base of the toilet was missing, substandard and/or deteriorated. Modern standards require caulk to be installed around the toilet base where it meets the floor for sanitary reasons. I recommend leaving about a one inch space at the back of the toilet un-caulked. Without it, soiled water can soak into flooring and sub-floor materials if the toilet overflows. Condensation from the toilet can also soak into the flooring. Recommend that a qualified person caulk around toilet bases per standard building practices.

Interior, Doors and Windows
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Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems; communications wiring; central vacuum systems; elevators and stair lifts; cosmetic deficiencies such as nail-pops, scuff marks, dents, dings, blemishes or issues due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment; deficiencies relating to interior decorating; low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold (unless requested), hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window, drawer, cabinet door or closet door operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Determining the cause and/or source of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.
Type(s) of windows: Metal, Multi-pane

58) Condensation or staining was visible between multi-pane glass in one or more windows. This usually indicates that the seal between the panes of glass has failed or that the desiccant material that absorbs moisture is saturated. As a result, the view through the window may be obscured and accumulated condensation may leak into the wall structure below. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair windows as necessary. Usually, this means replacing the glass in window frames.

Be aware that evidence of failed seals or desiccant may be more or less visible depending on the temperature, humidity, sunlight, etc. Windows or glass-paneled doors other than those that the inspector identified may also have failed seals and need glass replaced. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to identify every window with failed seals or desiccant.

Including at the northwest bedroom.
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59) Floors in one or more areas were not level. This can be caused by foundation settlement or movement of the foundation, posts and/or beams. Significant repairs may be needed to make floors level. Recommend that a qualified contractor and/or engineer evaluate further. Repairs should be performed by a qualified contractor.

60) Wood flooring in one or more areas was cupping. This may indicate that the floor has been exposed to water or that the flooring was not allowed to equalize in moisture content before being installed. Consult with the property owner and/or have a qualified specialist evaluate. It's likely that affected areas of the wood flooring will need to be refinished to obtain a flat surface. For more information, visit:
http://www.reporthost.com/?WDFLRPRB

Noticed at the kitchen around the refrigerator opening.

61) One or more interior doors were damaged. Recommend that a qualified person replace or repair doors as necessary.

Noticed at the master bathroom pocket door.
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62) The sash-side spring mechanisms in one or more windows were broken, loose or disconnected. The window(s) were difficult to operate as a result, and not square in their frames or tracks. Recommend that a qualified contractor or service technician repair as necessary so windows open and close easily, and stay open without support.

Including at the northwest bedroom.

63) Minor cracks, nail pops and/or blemishes were found in walls and/or ceilings in one or more areas. Cracks and nail pops are common, are often caused by lumber shrinkage or minor settlement, and can be more or less noticeable depending on changes in humidity. They did not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons. For recurring cracks, consider using an elastic crack covering product:
http://www.reporthost.com/?ECC

Crawl Space
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Limitations: Structural components such as joists and beams, and other components such as piping, wiring and/or ducting that are obscured by under-floor insulation are excluded from this inspection. The inspector does not determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.

The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that water will not accumulate in the crawl spaces in the future. Complete access to all crawl space areas during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. heavy rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so.

The inspector attempts to locate all crawl space access points and areas. Access points may be obscured or otherwise hidden by furnishings or stored items. In such cases, the client should ask the property owner where all access points are that are not described in this inspection, and have those areas inspected. Note that crawl space areas should be checked at least annually for water intrusion, plumbing leaks and pest activity.
Crawl space inspection method: Traversed
Location of crawl space access point #A: Building exterior
Crawl space access points that were opened and viewed, traversed or partially traversed: A
Pier or support post material: Wood
Beam material: Solid wood
Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
Vapor barrier present: Yes
Ventilation type: Unconditioned space, with vents

64) Fungal rot was found at one or more sill plates and/or beams. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.

Primarily noticed at the southeast corner of the crawl space.
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65) Ventilation for the crawl space was substandard. There were too few vents. This can result in high levels of moisture in the crawl space and is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. One square foot of vent area should be installed for 150 square feet of crawl space. Vents should be evenly distributed and within a few feet of corners to promote air circulation. Recommend that a qualified contractor install or improve venting per standard building practices.

66) One or more support posts were not positively secured to the beam above. While this is common in older homes, current standards require positive connections between support posts and beams above for earthquake reinforcement. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing metal plates, plywood gussets or dimensional lumber connecting posts and beams.
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67) One or more posts were loose and not attached to the beam and/or pier pad. The pier pad may have settled or the post was not cut to the correct length. I recommend having a qualified person repair as necessary.
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68) No insulation was installed under the floor above the crawl space. Recommend that a qualified person install insulation for better energy efficiency and per standard building practices. Typically this is R-19 rated fiberglass batt with the attached facing installed against the warm (floor) side.

69) The vapor barrier in some areas of the crawl space was loose or askew. Soil was exposed as a result and will allow water from the soil to evaporate up into the structure. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. A 6 mil black plastic sheet should be placed over all exposed soil with seams overlapped to 24 inches, and not in contact with any wood structural components. The sheeting should be held in place with bricks or stones, not wood. Recommend that a qualified person replace or repair the vapor barrier where necessary and per standard building practices.

70) One or more wooden support posts were resting on a concrete footing, pier or slab below and were in direct contact with the concrete. This can result in elevated levels of moisture in the wooden support post ends and is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Impervious membranes such as composition shingle scraps should be placed between posts and the concrete, or metal brackets should support the post bases. Even if posts are made of treated wood, the cut ends may not have been field-treated, leaving little or no preservative at the post center. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing composition shingle scraps between the posts and the concrete below. Note that this may be a significant effort due to the need to lift the support posts.
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71) One or more outdoor crawl space access hatches or doors were loose. Water and/or vermin can enter the crawl space. Recommend that a qualified person replace, install or repair hatches or doors where necessary.

72) These images are general pictures of the homes crawl space.
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Wood Destroying Organism Findings
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Limitations: This report only includes findings from accessible and visible areas on the day of the inspection. In addition to the inaccessible areas documented in this report, examples of other inaccessible areas include: sub areas less than 18 inches in height; attic areas less than 5 feet in height, areas blocked by ducts, pipes or insulation; areas where locks or permanently attached covers prevent access; areas where insulation would be damaged if traversed; areas obscured by vegetation. All inaccessible areas are subject to infestation or damage from wood-destroying organisms. The inspector does not move furnishings, stored items, debris, floor or wall coverings, insulation, or other materials as part of the inspection, nor perform destructive testing. Wood-destroying organisms may infest, re-infest or become active at any time. No warranty is provided as part of this inspection.

73) Evidence of dampwood termites were found in the form of frass, fecal pellets and/or galleries or holes in wood with visible wood damage. Recommend the following:
  • Correct any conducive conditions for wood-destroying organisms mentioned in this report.
  • Consult with the property owner about any history of infestation.
  • Have a state-licensed pest control operator evaluate further and treat as necessary.

Primarily noticed at the subfloor, beams and/or sill plate along the south and west walls of the crawl space.
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