A&J Home Inspection


Email: AJHOME@dishmail.net
Phone: (240) 818-8570
Inspector's phone: (301) 834-7619
1608 Hoffmaster Road 
Knoxville, Md. 21758
Inspector: John Coleman
Maryland License #30058

   

Property Inspection Report
Client(s):  CHATTAR SAINI
Property address:  11023 Outpost Dr., North Potomac, Md 20878
Inspection date:  Friday, April 12, 2013

This report published on Friday, April 12, 2013 10:32:30 PM EDT

View report summary

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
CommentFor your information 

Wood Destroying Organism Concerns
Concerns relating to wood destroying organisms are shown as follows:
InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
Conducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Partly cloudy
Temperature: Warm
Front of structure faces: South
Main entrance faces: South
Foundation type: Unfinished basement, Finished basement
1)   This townhome was built in 1988 and is in good general condition. The exterior has some flaws I was told that are to be covered under an HOA and are not mentioned further in the report.
There are some issues that should be addressed and some potential larger ticket items that should be considered.
Safety
1) Electric outlets that are loose, broken or wired incorrectly should be repaired.
2) Non-GFCI outlets within 6 feet of water source should be corrected.
3) Range missing anti-tip device should be corrected.
Plumbing
1) Loose toilet and sink should be properly secured.
2) Wall to whirlpool tub should be sealed properly to stop water leaking through to floor behind and beneath.
Potential larger priced items
1)Some appliances are older and will need replaced in the near future (they did operate properly at inspection.
2) Roof appears to be original with home (only one set of nails was observed in sheathing in attic and no nails were missing) This makes the roof about 25 years old and maybe approaching end of service life.
There are other items found within the report or at captions to pictures.

Photo 8  
Several outlets were loose in boxes.

Photo 15  
Range did not have anti-tip device.
Hood vents inside.
Outlets within 6 feet of water source should be GFCI and are not.
Garbage disposal worked but was very noisy.

Photo 18  
Outlet is broken and should be replaced.

Photo 26  
Toilet was loose in flange.

Photo 28  
Sink is loose on wall.
Tub needs caulking, has cracked tiles. Whirlpool tub threw water against wal and it leaked under tub.

Photo 31  
Area under tub where whirlpool threw water.

Photo 32  
Open ground wired.

Photo 33  
Open ground wired.
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Wall covering: Metal
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
2) One or more outside faucets are missing handles. Recommend installing handles where missing.

Photo 1  
Front water hose connection has broken handle.
 

3) One or more wooden deck support posts are in contact with soil. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. However no damage from wood destroying insects or organisms was found. Standard building practices require that there be at least 6" of space between any wood and the soil below, even if the wood is treated. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. Otherwise recommend installing borate based Impel rods to prevent rot.

Photo 3  
Note: I was told several items such as damaged siding, deck sealing, missing screens, damaged window and door trim are to fixed in an HOA and do not need to be mentioned further in my report.
 

4) Siding, door trim, window trim, deck cleaning and sealing, and some other items observed are supposed to covered by HOA and not further mentioned in this report.
 
Roof Return to table of contents
Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars
Roof type: Gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Estimated age of roof: maybe 25 years
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Adequate
5) The roof surface material appears to be near the end of its service life and will likely need replacing in the near future. The client(s) should budget for a replacement roof surface, and may want to have a qualified roofing contractor evaluate and attempt to issue a "5 year roof certificate".

Photo 42  
For report home faces south.

Photo 2  
The roof shingles were all present with no missing tabs or broken/curled corners seen. The Roof maybe be original with home as there was only one set of nails and no missing nails seen in sheathing below. This type of shingle has a normal service life of 20-30 years depending on exact manufacturer. If these are original with home they are about 25 years old.

Photo 39  
Trusses, penetrations and sheathing were good.

Photo 40  
No signs of leaks were seen.
 
Attic Return to table of contents
Inspection method: Partially traversed
Roof structure type: Trusses
Ceiling structure: Trusses
Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
Insulation depth: 8-16
 
Electric service Return to table of contents
Primary service type: Underground
Service amperage (amps): 200
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
Smoke detectors present: Yes
6) One or more screws are missing from the main service panel cover and should be replaced. Because energized wiring may exist behind the holes with the missing screws, recommend that a qualified, licensed electrician replace these screws, or that care be taken to ensure that the new screws do not come in contact with wiring inside the panel when they are installed. Stock screws from the panel manufacturer should be used, or their equivalent.

Photo 34  
200 amp panel box is located at the basement northwest corner. Permitt stickers show built in 1988. Labeling was good condition.
 
 
Water heater Return to table of contents
Type: Tank
Energy source: Electricity
Capacity (in gallons): 50
Manufacturer: U.S. Craftmaster
Model: ee3j50rdo45v
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 119
 
Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
Estimated age: Indoor section was made in 2007, outdoor unit could not be determined as serial number did not match code for determing age.
Primary heating system energy source: Electric
Primary heat system type: Heat pump
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Primary Air conditioning type: Heat pump
Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts, Flexible ducts
Manufacturer: PayneFedders
Model: GV185053199x
Filter location: In return air duct below furnace
7) Debris, dirt and/or dust are visible in one or more sections of supply and/or return air ducts. This can be a health hazard, especially for those with allergies or respiratory problems. The Environmental Protection Association (EPA) recommends considering having ducts professionally cleaned when "ducts are clogged with excessive amounts of dust and debris and/or particles are actually released into the home from your supply registers". At a minimum, the visible debris should be thoroughly cleaned. Recommend having a qualified contractor clean the ducts. For more information on duct cleaning in relation to indoor air quality, visit: http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/airduct.html

Photo 23  
Interior duct work appeared dirty and should be cleaned.
 

8) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.

Photo 22  
Payne air handler section was made in April 2007. Service was done till 2009.
 

9) Air handler filter(s) should be checked monthly in the future and replaced or washed as necessary.

Photo 23  
Interior duct work appeared dirty and should be cleaned.
 
 
Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
Location of main water shut-off valve: basement southwest corner
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Copper
Supply pipe material: Copper
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Plastic
 
Kitchen Return to table of contents

10) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

Photo 15  
Range did not have anti-tip device.
Hood vents inside.
Outlets within 6 feet of water source should be GFCI and are not.
Garbage disposal worked but was very noisy.
 

11) The range can tip forward, and no anti-tip bracket appears to be installed. This is a safety hazard since the range may tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it, or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free standing ranges since 1985. An anti-tip bracket should be installed to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/remodeling/article/0,1797,HGTV_3659_2017492,00.html

Photo 15  
Range did not have anti-tip device.
Hood vents inside.
Outlets within 6 feet of water source should be GFCI and are not.
Garbage disposal worked but was very noisy.
 

12) The under-sink food disposal is noisy. A qualified plumber or contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the food disposal as necessary.

Photo 15  
Range did not have anti-tip device.
Hood vents inside.
Outlets within 6 feet of water source should be GFCI and are not.
Garbage disposal worked but was very noisy.
 

13) The range hood fan vents into the kitchen rather than outdoors. Ventilation may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors. Recommend having a qualified contractor make modifications as necessary as per standard building practices so the range hood fan vents outdoors.

Photo 15  
Range did not have anti-tip device.
Hood vents inside.
Outlets within 6 feet of water source should be GFCI and are not.
Garbage disposal worked but was very noisy.
 

14) One or more appliances appear to be near, at, or beyond their intended service life of 10 to 15 years. Recommend budgeting for replacements as necessary.
15) Water stains and/or minor water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below the sink. The client(s) should monitor this in the future.
 
Bathrooms Return to table of contents

16) One or more toilets are loose. A qualified contractor should remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repairs if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking.

Photo 26  
Toilet was loose in flange.
 

17) One or more sinks is loose, or not securely attached to the wall behind it. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Photo 28  
Sink is loose on wall.
Tub needs caulking, has cracked tiles. Whirlpool tub threw water against wal and it leaked under tub.
 

18) Caulk is missing or deteriorated along the base of one or more bathtubs, where flooring meets the tub. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the floor structure.

Photo 9  
Caulking at spout and around base should be repaired.

Photo 28  
Sink is loose on wall.
Tub needs caulking, has cracked tiles. Whirlpool tub threw water against wal and it leaked under tub.

19) Caulk is missing or deteriorated around the base of one or more bathtub spouts. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to wall structures.

Photo 28  
Sink is loose on wall.
Tub needs caulking, has cracked tiles. Whirlpool tub threw water against wal and it leaked under tub.
 

20) Recommend cleaning and sealing grout in tile or stone flooring now and in the future as necessary to prevent staining and to improve waterproofing.

Photo 9  
Caulking at spout and around base should be repaired.

Photo 28  
Sink is loose on wall.
Tub needs caulking, has cracked tiles. Whirlpool tub threw water against wal and it leaked under tub.
 
Interior rooms Return to table of contents

21) One or more open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices. Replacement of three-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles is not an acceptable solution.

Photo 32  
Open ground wired.

Photo 33  
Open ground wired.

22) One or more electric receptacles and/or the boxes they are installed in are loose and/or not securely anchored. Wire conductors may be damaged due to repeated movement and/or tension on wires, or insulation may be damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Photo 8  
Several outlets were loose in boxes.

Photo 10  
Several outlets were loose in boxes.

23) Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 10 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit this article: NFPA urges replacing home smoke alarms after 10 years.

Photo 41  
Smoke detectors operated but appear older than 10 years.
 

24) One or more electric receptacles are broken or damaged. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. A qualified electrician should replace them as necessary.

Photo 18  
Outlet is broken and should be replaced.
 

25) Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.

Photo 16  
Window missing screen.
 

26) One or more doors will not latch when closed. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. For example, aligning strike plates with latch bolts and/or replacing locksets.

Photo 7  
Door did not latch and missing stop.

Photo 12  
Did not latch.

27) Door stops are missing in one or more areas. Recommend having a qualified contractor install trim where missing.

Photo 7  
Door did not latch and missing stop.

Photo 12  
Did not latch.
 

Photo 4  
The Fedders heat pump compressor unit is model CH24ACD1V (a 2 ton btu unit) and serial number GV185053199X. The information I have for age of this unit is not clear as I am told to "use the last two letters at the end of serial number to determine age". Unit only has one letter at end. My judgement says unit is older as it uses R-22 refridgerant.

Photo 5  
Heat pump unit operated properly.

Photo 6  
Next door unit had flashing at roof. No signs of leaking were seen in attic.

Photo 11  
Several areas of hardwood floor needs refinished.

Photo 13  
Fridge operated properly at inspection.

Photo 14  
Serial number HM229062 indicates fridge made either May 2007 or May 1995.

Photo 17  
Water temp was a good 119 degrees.

Photo 19  
Water meter and shut off valve are in basement southwest corner.

Photo 20  
Several valves have handles extending from drywall. This one is for hose connection at front of home.

Photo 21  
Dishwasher operated properly but is at or beyond normal service life.

Photo 24  

Photo 25  
Per serial number o510105643 the water heater was made in February 2010.

Photo 27  
Return air was 74 derees.

Photo 29  
Supply air for cooling was 55, a 19 degree temp change on AC.

Photo 30  
Emergency heat supply air was 110 degrees for a 36 degree temp change.

Photo 35  
Permit sticker

Photo 36  
Wiring was good.

Photo 37  
Moisture meter in rug did not detect moisture in basement flooring.

Photo 38  
Attic has good ventilation. Insulation is blown in and is between 8-16 inches deep.
 

 
Your default report footer here...