Affordable Home

Website: http://www.ahipm.com
Email: dan@affordablehomeonline.com
Inspector's email: dan@affordablehomeonline.com
Phone: (207) 478-2655
Inspector's phone: (207) 478-2655
423 Union Street 
Bangor, Maine 04401
Inspector: Daniel Smart
NACHI Certified - Member #NACHI07050707
Maine Radon ID #ME28600C : Registered to provide radon air and radon water testing.

  

Affordable Home - Inspection & Report
Client(s):  Sample Report
Property address:  123 Main Street
Any Town, Maine
Inspection date:  Thursday, July 18, 2013

This report published on Sunday, July 21, 2013 2:36:51 PM EDT

View report summary

 
This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

Thank you for choosing Affordable Home for your inspection needs. We've made every effort to provide you with a thorough, high quality inspection, and hope that the information in this report proves to be valuable in your consideration of this property. If for any reason you are unsatisfied with this report, or have questions after reviewing it, please don't hesitate to call us. If you are satisfied, please tell your friends about us.

This inspection complies with the National Association of Home Inspectors' (NAHI) Standards of Practice. This report is intended to identify major defects within a structure that significantly affect its habitability or that cost in excess of $500 to repair, although minor defects may be noted in the report. Cosmetic items such as damaged molding, trim, doors, cabinets, interior paint or carpet are generally excluded from this report.

Inspection reports by nature focus on defects and may seem negative in tone. Some features of this property may be in excellent condition and of high quality but have not been mentioned, or been deemed adequate in the report. This is not meant to downplay this property's assets, but to focus on alerting you to potentially expensive problems. Bear in mind that all homes, regardless of their age, have some number of defects.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Grounds
Exterior and Foundation
Crawl Space
Roof
Attic and Roof Structure
Garage or Carport
Electric
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Water Heater
Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC)
Kitchen
Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks
Interior, Doors and Windows
Private Well
 
 
General Information Return to table of contents
Report number: 5182013
Time started: 9:00 am
Present during inspection: Client, Realtor
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Inspector: Dan Smart
Weather conditions during inspection: Dry (no rain), Sunny
Temperature during inspection: Hot
Ground condition: Dry
Recent weather: Dry (no rain), Sunny
Overnight temperature: Warm
Inspection fee: $350 + VA Water & Air Radon
Type of building: Single family
Buildings inspected: One house, One detached garage
Number of residential units inspected: 1
Age of main building: 1994
Occupied: Furniture or stored items were present
1) Safety, Maintain - One or more hornet, bee or wasp nests were found at the building exterior. These can pose a safety hazard. A qualified person should remove nests or exterminate as necessary.

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2) Comment - Many areas and items at this property were obscured by furniture. This often includes but is not limited to walls, floors, windows, inside and under cabinets, under sinks, on counter tops, in closets, behind window coverings, under rugs or carpets, and under or behind furniture. Areas around the exterior, under the structure, in the garage and in the attic may also be obscured by stored items. The inspector in general does not move personal belongings, furnishings, carpets or appliances. When furnishings, stored items or debris are present, all areas or items that are obscured, concealed or not readily accessible are excluded from the inspection. The client should be aware that when furnishings, stored items or debris are eventually moved, damage or problems that were not noted during the inspection may be found.

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Grounds Return to table of contents
Limitations: Unless specifically included in the inspection, the following items and any related equipment, controls, electric systems and/or plumbing systems are excluded from this inspection: detached buildings or structures; fences and gates; retaining walls; underground drainage systems, catch basins or concealed sump pumps; swimming pools and related safety equipment, spas, hot tubs or saunas; whether deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight; trees, landscaping, properties of soil, soil stability, erosion and erosion control; ponds, water features, irrigation or yard sprinkler systems; sport courts, playground, recreation or leisure equipment; areas below the exterior structures with less than 3 feet of vertical clearance; invisible fencing; sea walls, docks and boathouses; retractable awnings. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only.
Site profile: Level
Condition of driveway: Appeared serviceable
Driveway material: Gravel
Condition of deck, patio and/or porch covers: Appeared serviceable
Deck, patio, porch cover material and type: Open, Covered (Refer to Roof section)
Condition of decks, porches and/or balconies: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Deck, porch and/or balcony material: Wood
Condition of stairs, handrails and guardrails: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Exterior stair material: Wood
3) Safety, Repair/Replace - Handrails at one or more flights of stairs were missing. This is a potential fall hazard. Handrails should be installed at stairs with four or more risers or where stairs are greater than 30 inches high. Recommend that a qualified contractor install handrails where missing and per standard building practices.

Guardrails at one or more locations with drop-offs higher than 30 inches were missing. This poses a fall hazard. Guardrails should be installed where walking surfaces are more than 30 inches above the surrounding grade or surfaces below. Recommend that a qualified contractor install guardrails where missing and per standard building practices. (side porch)

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4) Repair/Maintain - Soil was in contact with or close to wooden stairs at one or more locations. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Soil should be graded and/or removed so no wood-soil contact is present, if possible. Otherwise, installing products such as borate-based Impel rods may help to prevent infestation and damage. For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=impel+rods

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5) Maintain - Decking boards were spaced closer together than 3/8 inch, and organic debris (e.g. leaves, fir needles) has accumulated between the boards. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms since decking boards and joists below are more subject to fungal rot where there is accumulated debris. Recommend cleaning and removing debris from board gaps as necessary. If or when the deck boards are replaced, recommend spacing boards so they're 3/8 inch apart to allow debris to fall through the cracks rather than accumulate in them.
6) Maintain - Wooden stair, deck or porch surfaces were overdue for normal maintenance. Recommend that a qualified person clean and preserve as necessary. Where decks have been coated with a finish such as opaque stains or paint, it may be too difficult to strip the finish and apply anything but paint or opaque stain. Where transparent stain or penetrating oil has been applied in the past, recommend that a penetrating oil be used. For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=penetrating+oil+decks
http://www.google.com/search?q=deck+maintenance
 
 
Exterior and Foundation Return to table of contents
Limitations: The inspector performs a visual inspection of accessible components or systems at the exterior. Items excluded from this inspection include below-grade foundation walls and footings; foundations, exterior surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris; wall structures obscured by coverings such as siding or trim. Some items such as siding, trim, soffits, vents and windows are often high off the ground, and may be viewed using binoculars from the ground or from a ladder. This may limit a full evaluation. Regarding foundations, some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of seismic reinforcement.
Condition of wall exterior covering: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood
Condition of foundation and footings: Appeared serviceable
Apparent foundation type: Crawl space
Foundation/stem wall material: Concrete block
7) Repair/Replace - Water damage, peeling paint, missing stain with evidence of compromised wood was found at one or more sections of siding or trim. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.

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8) Maintain - The paint or stain finish in some areas was failing (e.g. peeling, faded, worn, thinning). Siding and trim with a failing finish can be damaged by moisture.Recommend that a qualified contractor prep (e.g. clean, scrape, sand, prime, caulk) and repaint or restain the building exterior where necessary and per standard building practices. Any repairs needed to the siding or trim should be made prior to this.

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9) Comment - Many foundation walls below the house were obscured by insulation. The inspector was unable to evaluate these areas. They are excluded from this inspection.

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Crawl Space Return to table of contents
Limitations: Structural components such as joists and beams, and other components such as piping, wiring and/or ducting that are obscured by under-floor insulation are excluded from this inspection. The inspector does not determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.

The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that water will not accumulate in the crawl spaces in the future. Complete access to all crawl space areas during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. heavy rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so.

The inspector attempts to locate all crawl space access points and areas. Access points may be obscured or otherwise hidden by furnishings or stored items. In such cases, the client should ask the property owner where all access points are that are not described in this inspection, and have those areas inspected. Note that crawl space areas should be checked at least annually for water intrusion, plumbing leaks and pest activity.

Crawl space inspection method: Traversed
Location of crawl space access point #A: Building exterior
Condition of floor substructure above crawl space: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Pier or support post material: Concrete block, Steel
Beam material: Solid wood
Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
Condition of crawl space ventilation: Appeared serviceable
10) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Rot was found at one or more beams. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.

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11) Repair/Maintain, Evaluate - One or more support posts appear to have been added since the original construction based on the inspector's observations. Such posts may have been added to reduce bounce or sag in floors above. Consult with the property owner about this, or that a qualified contractor evaluate and make permanent repairs per standard building practices if necessary.

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12) Repair/Maintain - One or more wooden support posts were resting on a concrete footing, pier or slab below and were in direct contact with the concrete. This can result in elevated levels of moisture in the wooden support post ends and is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Impervious membranes such as composition shingle scraps should be placed between posts and the concrete, or metal brackets should support the post bases. Even if posts are made of treated wood, the cut ends may not have been field-treated, leaving little or no preservative at the post center. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing composition shingle scraps between the posts and the concrete below. Note that this may be a significant effort due to the need to lift the support posts.

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Roof Return to table of contents
Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; solar roofing components. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on the roof surface material, nor guarantee that leaks have not occurred in the roof surface, skylights or roof penetrations in the past. Regarding roof leaks, only active leaks, visible evidence of possible sources of leaks, and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. The inspector does not guarantee or warrant that leaks will not occur in the future. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. Regarding the roof drainage system, unless the inspection was conducted during and after prolonged periods of heavy rain, the inspector was unable to determine if gutters, downspouts and extensions performed adequately or were leak-free.
Age of roof surface(s): 1994
Roof inspection method: Viewed from eaves on ladder, Viewed from ground
Condition of roof surface material: Near, at or beyond service life
Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Roof type: Gambrel
Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: One
Condition of exposed flashings: Appeared serviceable
Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below), Limited evaluation due to little or no rainfall during and prior to the inspection
Gutter and downspout material: Plastic
Gutter and downspout installation: Partial
13) Major Defect, Evaluate - The roof surface appeared to be nearing the end of its service life and will likely need replacing in the near future even if repairs are made now. Recommend discussing replacement options with a qualified contractor, and budgeting for a replacement roof surface in the near future. The client may also wish to consider having a qualified contractor attempt to issue a "5 year roof certificate."

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14) Repair/Replace - One or more gutter end caps were missing. Rainwater can come in contact with the building exterior or accumulate around the foundation as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person install end caps where missing.

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15) Repair/Maintain - One or more gutters, downspouts were missing. Rainwater can come in contact with the building exterior or accumulate around the building foundation as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

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16) Maintain, Monitor - One or more roof surface sections were designed so as to be prone to accumulating debris and/or snow. For example, where two slopes converged. Accumulated debris in these areas can result in leaks. At a minimum, monitor such areas for accumulated debris in the future and clean as necessary. Consult with a qualified contractor to determine what repairs or modifications may be possible to prevent leaks.
17) Comment - Normally the inspector attempts to traverse roof surfaces during the inspection. However, due to safety concerns about the roof configuration, the inspector was unable to traverse the roof and wasn't able to fully evaluate the entire roof surface.
18) - There are a wide variety of composition shingle roofs, which are comprised of asphalt or fiberglass materials impregnated with mineral granules that are designed to deflect the deteriorating ultra-violet rays of the sun. These roofs are warranted by the manufacturer to last from twenty to twenty-five years. The actual life of the roof will vary, depending on a number of interrelated factors besides the quality of the material and the method of installation. Poor maintenance is the most common cause of roof failure, but a southern exposure can cause a roof to deteriorate prematurely, as well as the practice of layering over another roof. However, the first indication of significant wear is when the granules begin to separate and leave pock marks or dark spots. This is referred to as primary decomposition, which means that the roof is in decline, and therefore susceptible to leakage. This typically begins with the hip and ridge shingles and to the field shingles on the south facing side. This does not mean that the roof is ready to be replaced, but that it should be serviced or monitored. Regular maintenance will certainly extend the life of any roof and will usually avert most leaks that only become evident after they have caused other damage. Whereas their condition can be evaluated, it is virtually impossible for anyone to detect a leak except as it is occurring or by specific water test, which are beyond the scope of our service. Even water stains on ceilings, or on the framing within attics, will not necessarily confirm an active leak without some corroborative evidence, and such evidence can be deliberately concealed. Consequently, only the installer can credibly guarantee that a roof will not leak, and they do. We cannot and do not give any such guarantees. We will examine every roof, evaluate it, and even attempt to approximate it's age, but we will not predict it's remaining life expectancy, nor guarantee that it will not leak. Naturally, the sellers or the occupants of a residence will generally have the most intimate knowledge of the roof and it's history. Therefore, we recommend that you ask the seller about it, and that you either include comprehensive roof coverage in your home insurance policy, or that you obtain a roof certification from an established roofing company.
 
 
Attic and Roof Structure Return to table of contents
Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation. Any comments made regarding these items are made as a courtesy only. The inspector does not determine the adequacy of the attic ventilation system. Complete access to all roof and attic spaces during all seasons and during prolonged periods of all types of weather conditions (e.g. high/low temperatures, high/low humidity, high wind and rain, melting snow) would be needed to do so. The inspector is not a licensed engineer and does not determine the adequacy of roof structure components such as trusses, rafters or ceiling beams, or their spacing or sizing.
19) Comment - No accessible attic spaces were found or inspected at this property. The inspector attempts to locate attic access points and evaluate attic spaces where possible. Such access points may be obscured by stored items or furnishings, but various home inspection standards of practice do not require inspectors to move stored items, furnishings or personal belongings. If such access points are found in the future and/or made accessible, a qualified person should fully evaluate those attic spaces and roof structures.
 
 
Garage or Carport Return to table of contents
Limitations: The inspector does not determine the adequacy of firewall ratings. Requirements for ventilation in garages vary between municipalities.
Type: Attached
Condition of garage: Appeared serviceable
Type of door between garage and house: Metal
Condition of exterior entry doors: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Exterior door material: Metal, Glass panel
Condition of garage vehicle door(s): Appeared serviceable
Type of garage vehicle door: Roll
Number of vehicle doors: 2
Condition of automatic opener(s): Appeared serviceable
Mechanical auto-reverse operable (reverses when meeting reasonable resistance during closing): No
Condition of garage floor: Appeared serviceable
Condition of garage interior: Required repair or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of detached garage or carport structure: Appeared serviceable
Condition of wall exterior covering: Appeared serviceable
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Condition of roof structure: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground
Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
20) Safety, Repair/Replace, Comment - Guardrails at one or more locations with drop-offs higher than 30 inches were missing. This poses a fall hazard. Guardrails should be installed where walking surfaces are more than 30 inches above the surrounding grade or surfaces below. Recommend that a qualified contractor install guardrails where missing and per standard building practices.

Handrails at one or more flights of stairs were missing. This is a potential fall hazard. Handrails should be installed at stairs with four or more risers or where stairs are greater than 30 inches high. Recommend that a qualified contractor install handrails where missing and per standard building practices.

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21) Safety, Repair/Replace - One or more gaps were found in the attached garage walls or ceilings (as a result of missing outlet and junction box covers). Current standard building practices call for wooden-framed ceilings and walls that divide the house and garage to provide limited fire-resistance rating to prevent the spread of fire from the garage to the house. Recommend that a qualified person repair per standard building practices. For example, by patching openings or holes, firestopping holes or gaps with fire-resistant caulking, and/or installing fire-resistant wall covering (e.g. Type X drywall). For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=attached+garage+fire+resistance

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22) Safety, Repair/Maintain, Evaluate - The auto-reverse mechanism on one or more automatic openers for garage vehicle doors was inoperable. This is a potential safety hazard. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html

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23) Repair/Maintain - One or more gutters, downspouts were missing. Rainwater can come in contact with the building exterior or accumulate around the building foundation as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.

Attached and detached garage*

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24) Maintain - Significant amounts of debris such as leaves, needles, seeds, etc. have accumulated on the roof surface. Water may not flow easily off the roof, and can enter gaps in the roof surface. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend cleaning debris from the roof surface now and as necessary in the future.

Vegetation such as trees, shrubs, and/or vines overhung the roof surface or were in contact with the roof edge. Organic debris such as leaves or needles are likely to accumulate in gutters and on the roof surface. Gutters can overflow and cause water to come in contact with the building exterior or water can accumulate around the foundation. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Vegetation in contact with the roof can damage the roof surface and/or the roof drainage system. Recommend pruning vegetation so as to not be in contact with the roof and to not overhang the roof surface. If vegetation is too tall then it should be pruned at least 10 feet above the roof surface.

Detached garage*

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25) Comment - Some floor areas were obscured by stored items and couldn't be fully evaluated.

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Electric Return to table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: generator systems, transfer switches, surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low-voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific or anticipated needs, or if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, and does not install or change light bulbs. The inspector does not evaluate every wall switch or receptacle, but instead tests a representative number of them per various standards of practice. When furnishings, stored items or child-protective caps are present some receptacles are usually inaccessible and are not tested; these are excluded from this inspection. Receptacles that are not of standard 110 volt configuration, including 240-volt dryer receptacles, are not tested and are excluded. The functionality of, power source for and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors is not determined as part of this inspection. Upon taking occupancy, proper operating and placement of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors should be verified and batteries should be changed. These devices have a limited lifespan and should be replaced every 10 years. The inspector attempts to locate and evaluate all main and sub-panels. However, panels are often concealed. If panels are found after the inspection, a qualified electrician should evaluate and repair if necessary. The inspector attempts to determine the overall electrical service size, but such estimates are not guaranteed because the overall capacity may be diminished by lesser-rated components in the system. Any repairs recommended should be made by a licensed electrician.
Primary service type: Overhead
Service voltage (volts): 120-240
Estimated service amperage: 200
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
Condition of main service panel: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of sub: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Location of main service panel #A: Utility room
Location of sub-panel #B: Garage
Condition of branch circuit wiring: Serviceable
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: None visible
Smoke alarms installed: Yes, but not tested
Carbon monoxide alarms installed: Yes, but not tested
Smoke alarm power source(s): Battery
26) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles (outlets) at the kitchen had no visible ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection, or the inspector was unable to determine if GFCI protection was present. If not GFCI-protected, receptacles in wet areas pose a shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and install GFCI protection if necessary and per standard building practices. General guidelines for GFCI-protected receptacles include the following locations:For more information, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/099.pdf

Electrical outlets on the left and right of the kitchen stove.

The outlets on the left did not respond when tested and did not have power. The outlet to the right of the stove responded but did not have proper GFCI protection.

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27) Safety, Repair/Replace - Neutral wires were doubled or bundled together under the same lug on the neutral bus bar in panel(s) #A, B This is a potential safety hazard in the event that one of the circuits needs to be isolated during servicing. For one neutral to be disconnected, other neutrals from energized circuits sharing the same lug will be loosened. Power surges may result on the energized circuits and result in damage or fire. Also, multiple wires under the same lug may not be secure, resulting in loose wires, arcing, sparks and fire. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=double+tap+on+neutral+bus+bar

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28) Safety, Repair/Replace - One or more smoke alarms were missing, damaged, or missing components. Smoke alarms should be replaced as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

*Crawlspace

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29) Safety, Repair/Maintain - One or more cover plates for switches, receptacles (outlets) or junction boxes were missing or broken. These plates are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from occurring due to exposed wires. Recommend that a qualified person install cover plates where necessary.

Attached garage*
Detached Shed*

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30) Safety, Repair/Maintain - One or more wall-mounted exterior light fixtures had no caulk installed above the back plate. Water can enter the space behind the back plate and contact wiring. This is a potential shock hazard. Recommend that a qualified person apply caulk above and around the back plate per standard building practices. A gap should be left at the bottom of the plate so that condensation can drain out.

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31) Safety, Evaluate - Branch circuit wiring installed in buildings built prior to the mid 1980s is typically rated for a maximum temperature of only 60 degrees Celsius. This includes non-metallic sheathed (Romex) wiring, and both BX and AC metal-clad flexible wiring. Knob and tube wiring, typically installed in homes built prior to 1950, may be rated for even lower maximum temperatures. Newer electric fixtures including lighting and fans typically require wiring rated for 90 degrees Celsius. Connecting newer fixtures to older, 60-degree-rated wiring is a potential fire hazard. Repairs for such conditions may involve replacing the last few feet of wiring to newer fixtures with new 90-degree-rated wire, and installing a junction box to join the old and new wiring.

It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if such incompatible components are installed, or to determine the extent to which they're installed. Based on the age of this building, the client should be aware of this safety hazard, both for existing fixtures and when planning to upgrade with newer fixtures. Consult with a qualified electrician for repairs as necessary.

32) Safety, Comment - One or more "plug-in" or battery powered type carbon monoxide alarms were found. Because such CO alarms can be easily removed, recommend that the client verify that CO alarms haven't been removed upon taking occupancy. If removed, then recommend installing new CO alarms outside of each separate sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms on each level and in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations. Note that some states and/or municipalities require CO alarms to be installed for new construction and/or for homes being sold. For more information, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html

33) Evaluate - Bulbs in one or more light fixtures were missing, inoperable or broken. These light fixtures couldn't be fully evaluated. If replacement bulbs are inoperable, then recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate and repair or replace light fixtures as necessary.

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34) Comment - Equipment for a generator system was found. Generators, transfer switches and any associated wiring are excluded from this inspection. Recommend that the client consult with the property owner or review documentation to familiarize themselves with the operation of this system.

Maine Generator & Solar Power, Inc
339 Park Street
Milo, Me 04463
207-965-8723

Kohler Power Systems
Additional information about this company and product may be viewed here: http://kohlerpower.com/filterresults.htm?sectionNumber=13561&categoryNumber=13061&filter_0=LP&filter_1=ALL&filter_2=ALL

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35) - One or more multi-wire circuits are noted in the panel, which appear to be wired incorrectly. Multi wire branch circuits should be protected by a double-pole common-internal trip circuit breaker, including the physical "trip tie" which bonds the two circuit breaker switches together. This is a safety measure which protects people working on the building wiring and which helps assure that the circuit is wired properly at the panel. Even if local electrical inspectors do not require this measure we recommend it as a safety item and as good construction practice. Service by a licensed electrician is recommended

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Plumbing / Fuel Systems Return to table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: private/shared wells and related equipment; private sewage disposal systems; hot tubs or spas; main, side and lateral sewer lines; gray water systems; pressure boosting systems; trap primers; incinerating or composting toilets; fire suppression systems; water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems; plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks; backflow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determine the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks.
Condition of service and main line: Appeared serviceable
Location of main water shut-off: Crawl space
Water service: Private well
Service pipe material: Plastic
Condition of supply lines: Appeared serviceable
Supply pipe material: PEX plastic
Condition of drain pipes: Appeared serviceable
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Condition of waste lines: Appeared serviceable
Waste pipe material: Plastic
Location(s) of plumbing clean-outs: Crawl space
Vent pipe condition: Appeared serviceable
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Sump pump installed: No
Sewage ejector pump installed: No
36) Repair/Replace - One or more hose bib (outside faucets) handles were missing. Recommend that a qualified person replace handles or make repairs as necessary.
37) Comment - Water shutoff valves, including the "main" and any such valves at sinks, toilets, dishwashers, washing machines, water heaters are never routinely operated by a home inspector. Only normal controls are tested for functionality.

Recommend that client(s) verify, prior to moving in large amounts of storage or belongings, that all shutoffs are fully functional, properly located and easily accessible at standard and critical areas. It is not uncommon to find that shutoff valves are difficult to operate or they may have leaks around the valve stems when operated. This problem, when present, can often be corrected by tightening the appropriate part of the valve. Regardless, if problems are noted or plumbing work is required, consult with a plumber.

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Water Heater Return to table of contents
Limitations: Evaluation of and determining the adequacy or completeness of the following items are not included in this inspection: water recirculation pumps; solar water heating systems; Energy Smart or energy saver controls; catch pan drains. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on water heaters, does not determine if water heaters are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit or a shut-off valve to be operated.
Condition of water heater: Appeared serviceable
Type: Tankless
Energy source: Propane
Temperature-pressure relief valve installed: Yes
Model number: REU-V2520FFU-US
Serial number: 03.07-100091 (MANUFACTURED 2003)
Location of water heater: Crawl space
Hot water temperature tested: Yes
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 122
Condition of burners: Appeared serviceable
Condition of venting system: Appeared serviceable
38) Comment - One or more tankless water heaters were observed at this property. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine the adequacy of this system since demand varies significantly with water usage. For example, with simultaneous showers while washing clothes or dishes, etc. During such usage, tankless water heaters may not keep up with demand. This inspection includes a limited evaluation of the water heater to determine the following:Any concerns observed related to the above items are noted in this report.

Hot water was available and serviceable upon review.

The owners manual for this unit may be viewed here: http://www.rinnai.us/documentation/downloads/V_Series_Indoor_25xx_U245-3250x0100_revised_A.pdf

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Heating, Ventilation and Air Condition (HVAC) Return to table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; solar, coal or wood-fired heat systems; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating or cooling system components, does not determine if heating or cooling systems are appropriately sized, does not test coolant pressure, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit, a shut-off valve to be operated, a circuit breaker to be turned "on" or a serviceman's or oil emergency switch to be operated. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks. Condensation pans and drain lines may clog or leak at any time and should be monitored while in operation in the future. Where buildings contain furnishings or stored items, the inspector may not be able to verify that a heat source is present in all "liveable" rooms (e.g. bedrooms, kitchens and living/dining rooms).
General heating system type(s): Forced air, Gas fireplace or stove
General heating distribution type(s): Ducts and registers
Last service date of primary heat source: 2004
Source for last service date of primary heat source: Label
Condition of forced air heating/(cooling) system: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Forced air heating system fuel type: Oil
Estimated age of forced air furnace: 2004
Forced air heating system manufacturer: Olsen
Location of forced air furnace: Crawl space
Condition of forced air ducts and registers: Appeared serviceable
Condition of burners: Appeared serviceable
Condition of venting system: Appeared serviceable
Condition of controls: Appeared serviceable
39) Safety, Repair/Replace - One or more ceiling fans were installed so the blades were less than 7 feet from the floor. This is a safety hazard. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary so blades are at least 7 feet off the floor (8 feet is better). For optimal air flow, ceiling fans should be installed at least 8-9 feet above the floor. If unable to repair so blades are at this height, then recommend removing the fan(s).

One or more ceiling fans wobbled excessively during operation. This is a potential safety hazard and may be caused by loose fasteners, blades, rod-fan body junction, the fan itself being loose, or bent, misaligned or unbalanced blades. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=unbalanced+ceiling+fan

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40) Safety, Repair/Maintain, Evaluate - The last service date of the gas or oil-fired heating system appeared to be more than 1 year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. Ask the property owner when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than 1 year ago, recommend that a qualified HVAC contractor inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. Any needed repairs noted in this report should be brought to the attention of the HVAC contractor when it's serviced. For more information visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html

Furnaces are not dismantled by inspectors in order to check for cracks or holes in heat exchangers. That is beyond the scope of a home inspection.

This unit estimated to be 9 years of age.

Forced-air furnaces have a life expectancy of 15-20 years. But, to maintain and extend the life of the appliance and for safety, manufacturers recommend that these systems be professionally cleaned and serviced by an HVAC professional annually.

Recommend that an HVAC professional service the unit at this time and, while on-site, technician to further evaluate the performance of the system, venting and provide an estimate of the remaining life. HVAC pro to explain to the client any routine maintenance that is required of a homeowner, such as filter replacement or cleaning.

Additional information about this unit:

Key Features:

60,000 to 90,000 BTU/h Output
Up to 82% Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency
Long lasting, top quality construction
Superior Design Advantages
High Efficiency Front Breach Upflow Oil Furnace

Olsen Multiposition furnaces are constructed with 100% welded, heavy-gauge steel heat exchangers that come standard with a limited lifetime warranty. Multi-speed blowers, high quality motors and components all provide peace of mind for years of worry-free service. Strong, minimum 20-gauge panels feature a baked-on epoxy-based powder coating, resistant to scratching or peeling, which protects your investment.

Additional information about this unit: http://www.olsenhvac.com/products_oilfurnaces_wml.asp

A laser thermometer was used to test accessible heat supply registers. Those ducts that I could readily access were, properly so, supplying heat unless otherwise noted in the report.

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41) Comment - A direct vent propane fireplace was installed.

The unit responded as expected when tested and was serviceable upon review.

The owners manual for this unit may be viewed here: http://www.jotul.com/FileArchive/Files/USA/Old%20products/Old%20Stoves%20and%20inserts%20manuals/Gas%20fireplaces/Jotul_GZ550_DV_Acadia_%20129787_D_1103.pdf

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Kitchen Return to table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: household appliances such as stoves, ovens, cook tops, ranges, warming ovens, griddles, broilers, dishwashers, trash compactors, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers, hot water dispensers and water filters; appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self and/or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances. The inspector does not note appliance manufacturers, models or serial numbers and does not determine if appliances are subject to recalls. Areas and components behind and obscured by appliances are inaccessible and excluded from this inspection.
Permanently installed kitchen appliances present during inspection: Range, Refrigerator, Microwave oven
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of under-sink food disposal: N/A (none installed)
Condition of dishwasher: N/A (none installed)
Condition of range, cooktop: Appeared serviceable
Range, cooktop type: Electric
Condition of refrigerator: Appeared serviceable
Condition of built: Appeared serviceable
Condition of hot water dispenser: N/A (none installed)
Condition of trash compactor: N/A (none installed)
42) Safety, Repair/Replace - The range could tip forward. An anti-tip bracket may not be installed. This is a potential safety hazard since the range can tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free-standing ranges since 1985. Recommend installing an anti-tip bracket to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=range+anti-tip+bracket

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43) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - An exhaust hood was installed over the cook top or range, but the fan recirculated the exhaust air back into the kitchen. This may be due to no duct being installed, baffles at the front of the hood not being installed, or a problem with the duct. This can be a nuisance for odor and grease accumulation. Where a gas-fired range or cook top is installed, carbon monoxide and excessive levels of moisture can accumulate in living spaces. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary so exhaust air is ducted outdoors.

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44) Comment - REFRIGERATOR MAKE: Maytag appliances
MODEL: mbf2256hes
SERIAL: 10157097ep

ELECTRIC STOVE MAKE: Kenmore
MODEL: 790.96613402
SERIAL: vf44327838

MICROWAVE MAKE: Maytag appliances
MODEL: mmv5156aas
SERIAL: 10437668cx

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Bathrooms, Laundry and Sinks Return to table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.
Location #A: 3/4 bath, first floor
Location #B: Half bath, second floor
Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of toilets: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of shower(s) and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
Condition of ventilation systems: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Bathroom ventilation type: Spot fans, with individual exhaust ducts
45) Safety, Maintain - The clothes dryer exhaust duct appeared to need cleaning. Significant amounts of lint build-up were visible and may reduce air flow. This is a fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified person clean this duct now and as necessary in the future. Some chimney sweeps or heating/cooling duct cleaners perform this service. For more information, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.pdf

46) Repair/Replace - The bathroom with a shower or bathtub at location(s) #A didn't have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture can accumulate and result in mold, bacteria or fungal growth. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it may not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when windows are closed or when wind blows air into the bathroom. Recommend that a qualified contractor install exhaust fans per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers or bathtubs.

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47) Repair/Replace - The clothes washer was installed over a finished space and had no catch pan or drain installed. Catch pans and drains prevent water damage to finished interior spaces below if or when the washing machine leaks, overflows or is drained. Recommend that a qualified contractor install both a catch pan and drain per standard building practices.

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48) Repair/Maintain - The sink drain stopper mechanism at location(s) #A was inoperable. Recommend that a qualified person repair or replace as necessary.

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49) Repair/Maintain - No caulk was installed around the base of the toilet at location(s) #A, B where fastened to the floor. Caulk should be applied approximately 3/4 of the way around the toilet base at the front for sanitary purposes and to prevent water intrusion. The back should be left uncaulked so water can escape if a leak ever occurs. Recommend that a qualified person caulk around the toilet base(s) per standard building practices.

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50) Repair/Maintain - Rubber water supply hoses were installed at the clothes washer. These hoses are prone to bursting when deteriorated, which can result in flooding and significant water damage. Recommend upgrading to braided, stainless steel hoses.

Maytag Washer/Dryer Combo
Model: LSE7806ACE
S/N: 22550582EN

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Interior, Doors and Windows Return to table of contents
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems; communications wiring; central vacuum systems; elevators and stair lifts; cosmetic deficiencies such as nail-pops, scuff marks, dents, dings, blemishes or issues due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment; deficiencies relating to interior decorating; low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window, drawer, cabinet door or closet door operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Determining the cause and/or source of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.
Condition of exterior entry doors: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Exterior door material: Metal, Glass panel
Condition of interior doors: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
Condition of windows and skylights: Appeared serviceable
Type(s) of windows: Vinyl, Multi-pane, Double-hung
Condition of walls and ceilings: Appeared serviceable
Wall type or covering: Drywall or plaster, Wallpaper, Wood
Ceiling type or covering: Acoustic spray, Wood
Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
Flooring type or covering: Carpet, Vinyl, linoleum or marmoleum, Wood or wood products
Condition of stairs, handrails and guardrails: Required repairs, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
51) Safety, Repair/Replace - Guardrails at one or more locations with drop-offs higher than 30 inches were missing. This poses a fall hazard. Guardrails should be installed where walking surfaces are more than 30 inches above the surrounding grade or surfaces below. Recommend that a qualified contractor install guardrails where missing and per standard building practices.

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52) Safety, Repair/Replace - Guardrails at one or more locations with drop-offs higher than 30 inches were too low. This poses a fall hazard. Guardrails should be at least 36 inches in height. Recommend that a qualified contractor replace or repair guardrails per standard building practices.

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53) Safety, Evaluate, Comment - Carbon monoxide alarms: A preliminary overview indicates that there are an insufficient number, or no, carbon monoxide (CO) alarms installed on premises. The home inspector is not a code enforcement official and it is possible that additional CO alarms were present but that they were not observed by the inspector. An approved carbon monoxide (CO) alarm must be installed outside each separate sleeping area and (as applicable) on each level of the home. These devices may be portable plug-in type, hardwired or built into smoke detectors. A home inspector does not test, or determine the functionality of, or the suitability of placement for, consumer alarms (carbon monoxide alarms or smoke detectors). Therefore, I recommend that clients further review the interior of the home and, as/if required, install or re-position alarms so as to comply with state guidelines and manufacturer's recommendations. Occupants should regularly test and replace batteries in alarms and replace any old or non-operational alarms (10 years is the maximum estimated design life).
54) Safety, Evaluate, Comment - Pushing the built-in test button does not ensure that the smoke sensor is functional. It only establishes that the electrical circuit and audible alarm are functional. It is recommended that all smoke detectors be replaced when new owners move in. Ionization technology responds first to fast, flaming fires while photoelectric technology responds faster to slow smoldering fires. Having both types would be ideal. When installing detectors it is recommended that they be placed at each level including the basement and in each bedroom and laundry room of the house. Placement should be in accordance with manufacturer's recommendations. Smoke detectors should be replaced at 10 year intervals or per manufacturer's suggestion. Batteries should be changed twice a year.
For more information on smoke detectors visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/smokealarms.pdf Smoke alarm safety tips

55) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more storm doors were damaged. Recommend that a qualified person evaluate and repair or replace as necessary.

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56) Repair/Replace - Trim or jambs around one or more exterior doors (including the attached garage doors) was damaged. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install as necessary.

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57) Repair/Replace - One or more window screens were damaged or deteriorated. These window(s) may not provide ventilation during months when insects are active. Recommend replacing window screens as necessary.
58) Repair/Maintain - One or more interior doors were sticking in the door jamb and were difficult to operate. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary. For example, by trimming doors.

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59) Minor Defect - Minor cracks, nail pops and/or blemishes were found in walls and/or ceilings in one or more areas. Cracks and nail pops are common, are often caused by lumber shrinkage or minor settlement, and can be more or less noticeable depending on changes in humidity. They did not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons. For recurring cracks, consider using an elastic crack covering product:
http://www.google.com/search?q=elastic+crack+cover

60) Maintain - Carpeting in one or more areas was significantly stained or soiled. Recommend having carpeting professionally cleaned as necessary.

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61) Evaluate, Comment - Home appliance estimated design life:
1. Gas furnace: 15-20 years
2. Gas boiler: 17-24 years
3. Oil furnace: 18-25 years
4. Electric furnace: 18-25 years
5. Heat pump: 15 years
6. Central air conditioning: 15 years
7. Water heater (tank): 8-12 years
8. Water heater (tankless): 20+ years
9. Range and oven: 18-20 years
10. Refrigerator/Freezer: 18-20 years
11. Dishwasher: 9-11 years
12. Microwave oven: 10 years
13. Range hood and fan: 14 years
14. Food disposal: 10-12 years
15. Garage door opener: 10 years
16. Laundry washing machine: 14 years
17. Laundry dryer: 14 years
18. Bathtub/Sink: 10-30 years
19. Smoke or CO detector: 8-10 years
20. Exhaust fans: 10 years

Home Maintenance Check List

Monthly:
1. Clean any removable dishwasher filters.
2. Purge food disposal by filling the kitchen sink with clean water, then turn on the device until the water drains through.
4. Wash refrigerator/freezer interior walls and door gaskets with a solution of one quart of warm water to two tablespoons of baking soda and wipe dry.
5. Vacuum and clean "return" air ducts/grills.
6. Inspect lighting fixtures and replace any burned-out bulbs.
7. Clean clothes dryer lint trap and/or duct for better energy efficiency and to decrease the risk of fire.

Quarterly:
1. Inspect and service doors by cleaning and lubricating latches, hinges or replacing weatherstrippings as might be required.
2. Inspect and repair, if necessary, exterior caulking and finish around windows, doors, and siding.
3. Replace/clean, at least quarterly, furnace, heating and cooling system filters.
4. Re-tighten knobs and pulls on cabinets. Clean and lubricate drawer tracks and guides.

Semi-annually:
1. Inspect and test smoke and carbon monoxide alarms. Replace backup batteries as might be required.
2. Test (GFCI) ground fault circuit interrupters and (AFCI) arc fault breakers.
3. Inspect and maintain/clean gutters and downspouts. Runoff water must be directed away from the home.
4. Inspect attics and substructure areas for rodent droppings or other signs of pests or leaks/standing water, etc.
5. Prior to the beginning of the rainy season, test sump pumps for adequacy and function.
6. Look for moisture or decay, outside and inside the house, where flat surface decks and landings attach to the home. This is especially important if the landings do not have proper flashings.
7. Clean range hood fan grills and housings.
8. Use a vacuum cleaner to remove dust on coils behind the refrigerator/freezer.

Annually:
1. Licensed contractor to inspect and service heating and air conditioning systems.
2. Professional contractor to inspect and service wood burning appliances and chimneys.
3. Seal any foundation cracks.
4. Inspect, clean and lubricate garage vehicle door tracks and test auto-reverse functions.
5. Clean and lubricate sliding glass door and window tracks.
6. Inspect exterior paint for cracking and wear. Repaint, caulk and seal as needed.
7. Reseal, as required, wood decks and landings.
8. Inspect, for water damage, pests or rot, any substructure and attic areas.
9. Inspect roof flashings, chimney caps, shingles.
10. Inspect outside electrical service lines for damage, exposed wires or proximity to tree limbs.
11. Inspect all supply hoses at sinks, toilets and washing machines.
12. Clean and repair caulking or grout in bathrooms or kitchens.
13. Clean bathroom exhaust fan blades and grills.
14. Inspect all electric cords and replace as needed.
15. Change water filters and have fresh water systems professionally serviced.

Tips for keeping drains clear:
1. Pour a pot of hot water down the drain once a week to help clear away fat or grease that may have built-up in the drain line or the P-trap.
2. If a drain is clogged, try pouring 1/2 cup of baking soda and 1/2 cup of white vinegar down the drain. Cover the drain and let the mixture sit for a few minutes. Then pour a pot of water down the drain.

General safety tips:
Ensure that you know where the following items are located:
1. Emergency contact telephone numbers.
2. Fire extinguishers and water hose pipes.
3. Heating gas/fuel main shutoff valve.
4. Main electrical disconnect circuit breaker(breaker box/service panel).
5. Main drain line clean-out.
6. Main water shut-off valve.
7. All window and door exits.

62) Comment - I have viewed walls, ceilings, doors, carpets, floors, cupboards, countertops, cabinets, closets, sinks, tubs, etc. Normally a home will show signs of past use so, unless specifically noted, the features appear to be typical. Some areas may be obscured by belongings, furniture, drapes, wall hangings or other storage. A home inspector is looking for significant issues and it is not the focus of the report to comment extensively on cosmetic matters (nail-pops, scuffs, blemishes, sliding drawers, etc), normal wear, minor mechanical wear or damage. Since the design and appearance of interior decor is important to a buyer and largely a matter of personal taste, recommend that buyer ascertain prior to closing that the interior -- floor coverings, cabinets, cupboards, etc -- meets personal expectations.

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63) Comment - Professional qualifications of workers: In most reports, I recommend that upgrades or repair work be performed by a "qualified person" or "qualified parties". I consider qualified parties, in the licensed trades and professions, to be those individuals who hold the necessary state or local licenses or permits to legally work in their field -- licensed electricians, licensed pest control applicators, licensed plumbers, licensed HVAC technicians, licensed engineers, licensed general contractors, licensed building architects, licensed landscape architects, etc. In instances where repair work may be legally done by an unlicensed party, it is my recommendation that the repair person be, based on past training, experience or expertise, "qualified" to complete the job at hand and to, at that time, also be capable of further evaluating the situation and making further recommendations and completing any related repairs or upgrades. Any work performed by licensed and/or qualified parties should include, as is required, obtaining permits from the state, the county or the city.

Below are the professionals I use at my properties.

Jon Jones (electrician, radon) is amazing and has great rates, great customer service.

Tim Lattig (heating) is a true professional, stands behind his work and maintains flexibility as the owner of the company.

Tim’s plumbing is a little more expensive than “discount” plumbers but it is because he stands behind his product and only uses the best.

Daniel Lane (roofing & general contractor with insurance) is a long time professional that is budget conscious and works to order.

I do not receive any financial incentive for directing you these professionals – I do so as a genuine desire to partner excellent service providers with valued clients.

Electrician, Radon Testing & Mitigation:
Jon Jones (207.852.7020)
http://www.alltradesme.com/alltrades-inc-electrical-services

Plumbing:
Tim's Plumbing (207.735.4969)
http://www.timsplumbingmaine.com/

Handy Man:
Daniel Lane (207.217.2185, Cell – 207.942.7321 home number which is a good place to leave a message if not reached)
Licensed and Insured general contractor
Plowing
Roofing
Landscaping
General Carpentry
General Repairs

Heating/Air Conditioning
Tim Lattig (207.290.1083)
http://www.midmainemechanicalllc.com/default.html
 
 
Private Well Return to table of contents
Limitations: Private well water supplies are specialty systems and are beyond the scope of the standards of practice for home inspections. Comments in this report related to a private well are made as a courtesy only and are not meant to be a substitute for a full evaluation by a qualified well specialist. The inspector does not test private well water for contamination or pollutants, determine if the supply and/or flow are adequate, or provide an estimate for remaining life of well pumps, pressure tanks or equipment. Only visible components are evaluated.
Type of well: Drilled
Location of well: Front of house
Condition of pump: Appeared serviceable
Type of pump: Submersible
Condition of pressure tank: Appeared serviceable
64) Evaluate - A sample of the water was collected and express shipped to A & L Lab, Auburn Maine for analysis. We will follow up the moment the results are available.
65) - Drilled Wells


Drilled wells penetrate about 100 to 400 feet into the bedrock. Where you find bedrock at the surface, it is commonly called ledge. To serve as a water supply, a drilled well must intersect bedrock fractures containing ground water.

Drilled Well Construction Features

The casing is usually metal or plastic pipe, 6 inches in diameter, that extends into the bedrock to prevent shallow ground water from entering the well. By law, the casing has to extend at least 18 feet into the ground, with at least 5 feet extending into the bedrock. The casing should also extend a foot or two above the ground’s surface. A sealant, such as cement grout or bentonite clay, should be poured along the outside of the casing to the top of the well. The well should be capped to prevent surface water from entering the well.

Submersible pumps, located near the bottom of the well, are most commonly used in drilled wells. Wells with a shallow water table may feature a jet pump located inside the home. Pumps require special wiring and electrical service. Well pumps should be installed and serviced by a qualified professional registered with your state.

Most modern drilled wells incorporate a pitless adapter designed to provide a sanitary seal at the point where the discharge water line leaves the well to enter your home. The device attaches directly to the casing below the frost line, and provides a watertight sub-surface connection, protecting the well from frost and contamination.

Older drilled wells may lack some of these sanitary features. The well pipe used was often 8, 10 or 12 inches in diameter, and covered with a concrete well cap either at or below the ground’s surface. This outmoded type of construction does not provide the same degree of protection from surface contamination. Also, older wells may not have a pitless adapter to provide a seal at the point of discharge from the well.
 

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The interior of the detached garage was not available to be reviewed and is excluded from this inspection.

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Report written by: Daniel Smart

Virtually all real estate has problems, regardless of age or usage. It is not my purpose to compile a complete, definitive, or exhaustive list of items that need repair, but to document the general condition of the residence and to note any visible major defects. This is not a comprehensive document about the structure and should not be relied upon as such. Cosmetic considerations (paint, wall covering, carpeting, window coverings, etc.) and minor flaws are not within the scope of the inspection. Although some minor and cosmetic flaws might be noted in this report as a courtesy to you, a list of the minor and cosmetic flaws noted here should not be considered a complete, definitive, or exhaustive list and should not be relied upon as such. Routine maintenance and safety items are not within the scope of this inspection unless they otherwise constitute visible major defects as defined in the Home Inspection Agreement. This report does not include all maintenance items and should not be relied upon for such items.

All conditions are reported as they existed at the time of the inspection. The information contained in this report may be unreliable beyond the date of the inspection due to changing conditions.

Home Inspectors, Licensed Specialists, and Experts;

Inspectors are generalists, are not acting as experts in any craft or trade, and are conducting what is essentially a visual inspection. Some state and local laws, therefore, require that inspectors defer to qualified and licensed experts (e.g., plumber, electrician, et al.) in certain instances. When we recommend consulting specialists or experts, it is possible that they will discover additional problems that a home inspector generalist cannot.