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A Closer Look Home Inspection

Website: http://www.reporthost.com/acloserlookhi
Email: tom_rees@yahoo.com
Phone: (801) 674-4994
4646 S Quail Park Dr. #C 
Holladay, UT 84117
Inspector: Tom Rees

 

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): John Smith
Property address: 123 Main Street, USA
Inspection date: Wednesday, June 11, 2008
This report published on 4/18/2009 9:40:02 AM MDT

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
Summary Page ItemThis concern will appear in Summary Page 
CommentFor your information 

Structural Pest Inspection Concerns
Items of concern relating to the structural pest inspection are shown as follows:
WDO/WDI InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
WDO/WDI DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
WDO/WDI Conducive
conditions
Conditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Roof
Garage
Attic
Exterior
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplace
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms (2)
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 1024
Inspector: Tom Rees
Structures inspected: House
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 1975
Time started: 9:00 A.M.
Time finished: 11:30 A.M.
Inspection Fee: $275.00
Payment method: Invoiced
Present during inspection: Clients
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Cloudy, Rain
Temperature: Cold
Ground condition: Wet
Front of structure faces: North
Main entrance faces: North
Foundation type: Finished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Irrigation system, Shed, Low voltage outdoor lighting
1)   This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
2)   Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)
    3)   Some wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by furniture and/or stored items. Some areas couldn't be evaluated.
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 20 years
    Gutter & downspout material: Plastic
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    4) The roof surface material is beyond or at the end of its service life and needs replacing now. The client(s) should consult with a qualified roofing contractor to determine replacement options and costs.
    5) One or more sections of roof flashing are deteriorated and/or rusted. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and replace flashing where necessary.
    6) One or more sections of flashing at the base of the chimney are deteriorated and/or substandard. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    7) Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    8)   One or more wall and/or ceiling surfaces between the attached garage and interior living spaces have gaps, holes, or missing or inadequate surface materials. These surfaces are intended to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces, and to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so the attached garage wall and ceiling surfaces that adjoin living spaces are tightly sealed and fire rated as per standard building practices. Typically these surfaces require a one-hour fire rating.
    9)   One or more garage electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all garage receptacles, except for one for use with a refrigerator or freezer, have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breakers as needed.
    10)   Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed in one or more areas so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.
    11)   Some wiring is loose, unsupported, or inadequately supported. Standard building practices require non-metallic sheathed wiring to be trimmed to length, attached to runners or to solid backing with fasteners at intervals of 4-1/2 ft. or less. Fasteners should be installed within 12 inches of all enclosures. A qualified, licensed electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, trim wire to length and/or install staples as needed.
    12)   The garage-house door isn't equipped with an automatic closing device such as sprung hinges. This door should close and latch automatically to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces and/or to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should install automatic closing devices as necessary, and as per standard building practices, so this door closes and latches automatically.
    13)   Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
    14)   Rear exterior entrance door hardware is damaged and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.
    15)   The interior perimeter of the garage is excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
    Roof structure type: Trusses
    Ceiling structure: Trusses
    Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill
    Insulation depth: 4 inches
    Insulation estimated R value: R-15
    16) One or more exhaust fan ducts terminate in attic because no vent cap is installed at the roof or exterior wall surfaces. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install vent caps where missing and as per standard building practices, so all exhaust air is vented outside.
    17)   The attic exhaust fan was not tested during the inspection. Recommend consulting with the property owner(s) as to how it operates and/or having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair if necessary.
    18)   The ceiling insulation's R rating is significantly less than what's recommended for this area. Recommend having a qualified contractor install additional insulation as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency.
    19)   No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.
    20)   Some attic areas were inaccessible due to lack of permanently installed walkways, the possibility of damage to insulation, low height and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Wall covering: Composition wood panels
    Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
    Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete with stone veneer
    Exterior door material: Solid core steel (front), Sliding glass (rear)
    21)   Section of wiring that wasn't terminated was found at rear of home. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.
    22)   One or more guardrails are too low. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. Standard building practices require that guardrails above drop-offs be 36 inches high. A qualified contractor should evaluate and modify or replace guardrails where necessary, and especially above drop-offs higher than 30 inches.
    23)   One or more outdoor electric receptacles appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all outdoor receptacles within six feet six inches of ground level have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breakers as needed.
    24) Flashing is missing from above one or more deck ledger boards. This can cause moisture to accumulate between the ledger board(s) and the structure. Rot may result in this area and cause the ledger board fasteners to fail. The deck may separate from the structure in this event and poses a significant safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install flashing above ledger board(s) where necessary. For more information on installing deck ledger boards visit: http://www.hometime.com/Howto/projects/decks/deck_4.htm

    And for more information on building safe decks in general, visit: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow/exteriors/article/0,16417,212625,00.html

    25)   Handrail(s) at some stairs are ungraspable and are a safety hazard. Handrails should be sized and shaped so your hand can encircle them. A qualified contractor should make repairs or modifications as necessary. For example, replacing existing handrails or installing additional handrails.
    26)   Gaps larger than four inches were found in one or more guardrails. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should make modifications as necessary so gaps in guardrails do not exceed four inches. For example, installing additional balusters or railing components.
    27)   Front outside faucet is missing backflow prevention device. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

    Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed.

    28) This property is clad with composition wood fiber siding. Many brands of this type of siding by different manufacturers are known to deteriorate and/or fail prematurely due to moisture penetration. Failure is typically visible in the form of swelling, cracking and delamination, especially at the bottom edges. Class action lawsuits have been filed or are being filed against most manufacturers of this material.

    Some areas of siding on this structure show the symptoms described above and need replacement and/or maintenance. Some manufacturers (Louisiana Pacific) recommend a repair process for this siding where affected areas are sealed with "Permanizer Plus", a flexible primer made by Pittsburgh Paint, followed by two coats of 100% acrylic latex paint. This sealant must be applied to the bottom edges using a brush. The face of the siding can be sprayed. The "Permanizer Plus" sealer isn't required for edges that aren't swollen, cracked or deteriorated, but the acrylic latex should still be brushed on these edges.

    A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace siding as necessary, and/or seal and repaint as necessary and as described above, or by other methods specified by the siding's manufacturer.

    For more information, visit:
    http://www.siding4u.com/failing-siding-help.php

    29)   Fence boards are loose and/or deteriorated (minor) in some areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs or replace sections as necessary.
    30)   Wood trim at rear garage entry door is deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    31) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
    32) Wooden timbers in one or more retaining walls have minor amounts of rot and/or damage by wood destroying insects. The client(s) should monitor such walls in the future for continued rotting and/or damage. Repairs and/or replacement by a qualified contractor may be necessary in the future.
    33)   Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Underground
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 125
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of sub panels: Garage and rear exterior
    Location of main disconnect: Exterior rear of house
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    System ground: Not Visible
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 125
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed, Copper
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    34)   Wires to rear exterior sub-panel are spliced into the service conductor wires in the main service panel. This "splicing before the main" is a safety hazard because no overcurrent protection exists for these circuit(s). A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    35)   One or more overcurrent protection devices are "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire (garage sub-panel). This is a safety hazard since the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks and fires may result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    36)   Neutral wires are doubled or bundled together on the neutral bus bar. This is unsafe due to the need to turn off multiple circuit breakers to work on any of the circuits using these wires. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    37)   The legends for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in the main service panel and garage sub-panel are missing. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 2 years
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    Manufacturer: American MOR-FLO
    38)   The water heater does not have seismic straps or struts installed. This is a potential safety hazard since movement can cause leaks in the gas supply lines or damage wiring. Leaks may also occur in water supply pipes. A qualified contractor should install seismic straps or struts as necessary and as per standard building practices.
    39)   No drip leg is installed on the water heater gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the water heater components. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.
    40)     Recommend green sticker water heater. Call licensed HVAC contractor.
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 33 years
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
    Manufacturer: Air-Ease Johnson Corp.
    Model: HAS 130 OBD
    Filter location: At the base of the furnace
    41)   The heat exchanger in the gas furnace is damaged and/or deteriorated from rust, corrosion, cracking and/or holes. This is a safety hazard due to combustion gases entering the air supply ducts. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace components as necessary.
    42)   Because of the age and/or condition of this furnace, recommend that a qualified heating and cooling technician inspect the heat exchanger and perform a Carbon Monoxide test when it's serviced.
    43)   The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be past its economic life and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    44)   The estimated useful life for air conditioning compressors is 8 to 15 years. This unit appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    45)   The air handler's filter(s) are loose or not securely installed. As a result, unfiltered air will flow through the system. The heating/cooling equipment service life and the indoor air quality may be reduced. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary, such as repairing or installing guides or retaining devices so filter(s) are securely installed with minimal gaps at edges.
    46)   Secondary condensate drain opening at furnace plenum is not plugged. A qualified HVAC contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): 105 psi
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Not found
    Location of main water meter: Front yard
    Location of main fuel shut-off: gas meter east side
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Not visible
    Supply pipe material: Copper, Polybutylene
    Vent pipe material: Not visible
    Drain pipe material: Not visible
    Waste pipe material: Not visible
    47)   Low flow indicator was running at water meter with all water off in home, this would indicate a leak in service or supply pipes. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair/replace as necessary.
    48)   The water supply pressure is greater than 80 psi. Pressures above 80 psi may void warranties for some appliances such as water heaters or washing machines. Flexible supply lines to washing machines are more likely to burst with higher pressures. Typically the pressure cannot be regulated at the water meter. Recommend having a qualified plumber evaluate and make modifications to reduce the pressure below 80 psi. Installing a pressure reducing valve on the main service pipe is a common solution to this problem. If one exists, then it should be adjusted for lower pressures.
    49)   No expansion tank is installed on this structure's water supply system. Expansion tanks are recommended when a property is on a public water supply system and the property's water system is "closed" via a pressure reducing valve (PRV), check valve, or backflow preventer. No room for expansion of water exists in this type of system. Thermal expansion occurs when water is heated during non-use periods. In a closed system with no provision for expansion, its effects may include:

  • Backflow into the water main
  • Damage to water heater connections, gas water heater flue tubes and pumps serving washers and dishwashers
  • Leaking faucets
  • "Weeping" of water through the water heater temperature-pressure relief (TPR) valve
  • Noisy water hammer in the pipes.

    Expansion tanks can eliminate these problems by giving water a place to go when thermal expansion occurs. When a water heating cycle ends, or when any fixture is opened within the system, the impact of thermal expansion is reduced, and water drains out of the expansion tank back into the system. Recommend having a qualified plumber install an expansion tank as per standard building practices.
    50)   Copper water lines in furnace room were sweating at time of inspection,recommend insulating lines to prevent water dripping onto building components.
    51) Some supply lines appear to be made of Polybutylene. Polybutylene is a plastic material used extensively during the 1980s and 1990s that has proven to be more prone to leakage than other types of supply piping systems like copper. Recommend reviewing any disclosure statements if available for comments on leaks in the water supply system.

    A class action lawsuit has been filed regarding this material that requires the manufacturers to cover piping systems installed between Jan. 1, 1978 through July 31, 1995. For more information on the class action lawsuit, visit http://www.polybutylenelawsuit.com/ , or call the Plumbing Claims Group at (800) 356-3496 for more information.

    52)   The inspector was not able to find the main water shut-off valve. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) to determine if a shut-off valve exists, find it themselves, or hire a qualified plumber if necessary to find it. If no shut-off valve is found for the structure, then recommend having a qualified plumber install one to more easily allow the water supply to be turned off in the event of an emergency, such as when a supply pipe bursts. Inspector believes valve is in basement but could not open door.
    53)   Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
     
    Fireplace Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Metal prefabricated
    Chimney type: Metal flue in chase
    54)   One or more fireplaces equipped with a gas burner has a damper that can be closed. This is a safety hazard due to the possibility of burner or pilot light exhaust gases entering living spaces. A qualified chimney service contractor should make repairs as necessary so the damper is made permanently open. Typically a bracket or bolt is installed for this purpose.
    55)   Recommend extend gas turn on in fire box. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Not Visible
    Beam material: Not Visible
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    56)   Substandard wiring was found for the under-sink food disposal. Unprotected wiring is exposed and wire is not secured at disposal. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    57)   One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    58)   The range can tip forward, and no anti-tip bracket appears to be installed. This is a safety hazard since the range may tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it, or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free standing ranges since 1985. An anti-tip bracket should be installed to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/remodeling/article/0,1797,HGTV_3659_2017492,00.html
    59)   The range hood fan vents into the kitchen rather than outdoors. Ventilation may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors. Recommend having a qualified contractor make modifications as necessary as per standard building practices so the range hood fan vents outdoors.
    60)   Recommend cleaning and sealing grout in tile or stone flooring now and in the future as necessary to prevent staining and to improve waterproofing.
     
    Bathrooms (2) Return to table of contents

    61)   One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breakers as needed.
    62)   One or more exhaust fans are not flush with ceiling. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. (no ducts see "attic")
    63)   Common bathroom toilet "runs" after being flushed, where water leaks from the tank into the bowl. Significant amounts of water can be lost through such leaks. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair or replace components as necessary.
    64)   Common bathroom sink stopper mechanism needs adjustment or repair. Stopper mechanisms should be installed where missing and/or repairs should be made so sink stoppers open and close easily.
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    65)   Relatively few electric receptacles are installed in one or more interior basement rooms. This can result in "octopus" wiring with extension cords, which is a fire hazard. A qualified electrician should evaluate and install additional receptacles as necessary and as per standard building practices.
    66)   Gaps larger than four inches were found in one or more guardrails. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should make modifications as necessary so gaps in guardrails do not exceed four inches. For example, installing additional balusters or railing components.
    67)   Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
     
    If you do not understsnd how to read this report please contact our office before proceeding with any sales transaction.