Website: http://www.reporthost.com/accurate
Email: johnv2201@yahoo.com
Phone: (518) 868-9755 · (518) 577-3954
FAX: (518) 868-9755
2201 St Hwy 162 
Esperance, NY 12066
Inspector: John Veivia

  

Your detailed home inspection report.
Client(s): Mock Inspection #1
Property address: 905 Deans Mill Rd.
Ravena, NY
Inspection date: Monday, April 10, 2006
This report published on 7/5/2006 1:40:59 PM EDT

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.


How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas. Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and shown in bold type. Items of concern follow descriptive information and are shown as follows:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major defectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor defectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 
Concern items are sorted by the types listed above.  Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Structural Pest Inspection Concerns
Items marked with the following icons relate to the structural pest inspection
InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.)
DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.)
Conducive
conditions
Conducive conditions for wood destroying insects or organisms. (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Detached Garage
Kitchen
Laundy Room
Bathroom First Floor
Bathroom Second Floor
Interior rooms
Attic
Basement
Electric service
Water heater
Plumbing
Heating and cooling
Well
Well Flow Test
Septic Dye Test


General information Return to table of contents  
Customer name: Mock Inspection
Report number: 060410
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 126 +/-
Interior Walls: Wood frame
Address of inspected property is: 905 Deans Mill Rd Ravena, NY
Road type at this location is: a rural road
Time started: 11:00 AM
Time finished: 1:30 PM
Inspection Fee: None
Present during inspection: Owner
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Cloudy
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Damp
Foundation type: Partial finished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Shed, Water filtration system, Water softener system, Generator systemDeck at garage
  1) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
  2) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygenists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)
  •  
    Exterior Return to table of contents  
    Footing material: Not visible
    Foundation material: Stone
    Exterior foundation exposure is: less than six inches.
    Grading within six feet of foundation: Slopes toward foundationAt right side of house
    Grading beyond six feet of foundation: Slopes away, Slopes towardFor most of property
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Siding material: Vinyl
    Siding condition: Cracked
    Trim Material: Same as siding
    Trim condition: Acceptable
    Exterior door material: Solid core steel
    Electrical service to house is: Overhead
    Overhead wires threatened: YesTree branches
    Meter is located: Right side of house
    Meter amperage rate is: 200 amps
    Meter seal from electric company intact: Yes
    Seervice voltage: 120-240 volt
    Drip loop present in incoming service wires: Yes
    Driveway material: Asphalt
    Trees and/or shrubs are too near the foundation or siding: At the front of the house, At the right side of the house, At the left side of the house
      3) Exterior weatherproof outlet does not have GFCI outlet. This is a safety hazard and could result in a shock. Recommend installing GFCI outet at any and all exterior locations.

    Photo 22  
     
      4) Incoming electric service is threatened by trees. Recommend calling the power company to trim the trees back so they are not in contact with the wires.

    Photo 21  
     
      5) One or more hornet, bee and/or wasp nests were found. These can pose a safety hazard. Nest(s) should be removed as necessary.
    6) One or more gutters are poorly sloped so that significant amounts of water accumulate in them rather than draining through the downspouts. This can cause gutters to overflow, especially when organic debris such as leaves or needles have accumulated in them. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as correcting the slope in gutters or installing additional downspouts and extensions if necessary.

    Photo 11  
     
    7) The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet. Some settlement of bricks at basement entrance is evident due to water pooling.

    Photo 20  
     
    8) One or more downspouts are loose or detached. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary so downspouts are securely anchored and functional.

    Photo 7  
     
    9) One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.

    Photo 19  
     
    10) One or more gutters are damaged. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should replace or repair gutters where necessary.

    Photo 7  
     
    11) Soil is in contact with or less than six inches from siding and/or trim. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Soil should be graded and/or removed as necessary so there are at least six inches of space between the siding and trim and the soil below.

    Photo 12  

    Photo 13  

    Photo 16  
     
    12) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
      13) Concrete skim coat on stone foundation wall is failing and coming of in numerous locations. Recommend this be repaired to prevent further deterioration.

    Photo 12  

    Photo 14  

    Photo 15  
     
      14) Vinyl siding has some damage at siding and corners. Also there is dirt and mildew build up from close proximity of shrubs and plants. Recommend the siding be cleaned and holes sealed.

    Photo 9  

    Photo 12  

    Photo 17  

    Photo 18  
      15) Basement entry at front of house is subjec to flooding. Recommend this be monitored during wet weather conditions.

    Photo 20  
     
      16) Electric meter and electric service lines at house are in good condition.

    Photo 8  

    Photo 10  
     
    Roof Return to table of contents  
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars
    Roof type: Gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Number of layers of roofing material noted:: Single layer
    Estimated age of roof: In the middle of its usefull life
    Defects Observed: Lifting
    Roof Requires: Monitor Regularly
    Roof Penetrations: Chimney, Vent Pipes
    Chimney made of: Brick
    Chmney appears to be built: Within the interior of the house
    Flue Liner: In not visible at the top of the chimney
    Spark arrester or rain cap: Not noted at top of chimney
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Visible Roof Ventilation: Gable Vents, Ridge Vents, None NotedNo ventialtion at rear section of house
    17) One or more composition shingles are damaged, deteriorated and/or missing, and should be replaced. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 5  
     
    18) Roofing nails in one or more areas have loosened or backed out. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as reseating nails and applying sealant.

    Photo 3  

    Photo 5  

    Photo 6  
     
    19) One or more composition shingles have raised, most likely due to nails that have loosened. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as reseating nails.

    Photo 4  
     
    20) Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.
     
    Detached Garage Return to table of contents  
    Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
    Exterior foundation exposure is: less than six inches.
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Siding material: Vinyl
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Number of bays: Two
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars
    Roof type: Gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Number of layers of roofing material noted:: Single layer
    Estimated age of roof: In the middle of its usefull life
    Defects Observed: Lifting
    Roof Requires: Monitor Regularly
    Visibility was limited by: Stored items
    Floor made of: Concrete
    Floor condition: Has some small cracks
    Entry Door: Wood
    Condition: Good, works properly
    Number and type of automobile doors: One
    Electric Openers: One
    Electric door openers operated: Yes, operated properly
    Auto Reverse: Worked properly
    Photo electric device: Missing
    Windows: Random tested and functioned properly
    Condition: Peeling Paint
    Ceiling: Closed in
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 100
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
      21) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 29  
     
      22) Window at left side of garage is severly deteriorated. Glasing is falling off, peeling paint and wood rot are all present. Recommend this be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

    Photo 25  
     
      23) Exterior lights on front of garage are all loose and damaged. Recommend they be repaired by a qualified contractor..

    Photo 27  

    Photo 28  
      24) Aluminum clading on facial is falling coming off. Recommend this be repaired to prevent damage to wood.
      25) Numerous area of damage to vinyl siding is present. Recommend this be repaired.

    Photo 23  

    Photo 24  
      26) Wall at left side of overhead door has been pushed in. This is likely the result of being hit with a car. It is not interfearing with the operation of the door and looks to have hapend a while ago. Recommend this be repaired at some point.

    Photo 26  
     
      27) The interior perimeter of the garage is excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.
      28) Garage Electrical panel.

    Photo 30  

    Photo 31  
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents  
    Cabinets are made of: Wood
    Cabinets were opened and closed and found: They seemed to function well
    Cabinets secured to wall: Yes
    Counter tops appear to be made of: Laminated veneer material
    Caounter tops are securely fastened: Yes
    Kitchen floor material is: Vinyl tile or sheet
    Floor condition is: Good
    Kitchen sink type: Double
    Kitchen sink is made of: Stainless Steel
    Ran water and found: No leaks
    Garbage Disposal: None installed
    Dishwasher brand: No dishwasher
    Refrigerator brand: Kenmore
    Age of refrigerator is: Newer
    Refrigerator in use: Yes
    Range brand: Frigidair
    Range type: Free standing
    Age of range is: Newer
    Operated range and found: All burners working
    Anti tipping bracket installed: No
    Range hood: No
    Oven is: Part of stove
    Operated oven and found: Gave off heat
    Ventilation: Fan built into microwave, Reciculates to inside
    Number of GFCI outlets in kitchen: Five or more
    GFCI oulets work properly: No
      29) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 39  
     
      30) The range can tip forward, and no anti-tip bracket appears to be installed. This is a safety hazard since the range may tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it, or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free standing ranges since 1985. An anti-tip bracket should be installed to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/remodeling/article/0,1797,HGTV_3659_2017492,00.html
      31) One electrcial outlet that was tested in the kitchen has reversed polarity. It is the last outlet at counter hight to the right of the sink. Reversed polarity means the hot and neutral wires are reversed at thier attachement points. This should be repaired since some appliances required the correct polarity to function. Recommend this be done when all kitchen outlets are changed to GFCI outlets.
     
    Laundy Room Return to table of contents  
    Location of laundry room is: Near the kitchen
    Washing machine brand: Kenmore
    Washing machine age: Mid life
    Observed connections for: The water supply and drain, The elctrical connection
    Operated washing machine: Not operated
    Dryer brand: Kenmore
    Dryer is: Electric
    Dryer age: Mid Life
    Operated dryer: Turned on and it heated up
    Dyer is vented to: Exterior
    Vent hose is made of: Plastic
      32) The clothes dryer is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information on dryer safety issues, see http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html

    Photo 42  
     
      33) The clothes dryer exhaust duct is kinked, crushed and/or damaged. Air flow is restricted as a result. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. The exhaust duct should be replaced or repaired, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html or http://chimneykeepers.com/dryerclean.html
      34) Improperly mounted electrical outlet for dryer. This could result in damage and potential shock hazard. Recommend repair by a qualified contractor.

    Photo 42  
     
      35) Non GFCI outlet at laundry. Due to location close to water supply I recommend this outlet be changed to a GFCI outet. Recommend repair by a qualified contractor.

    Photo 41  
     
     
    Bathroom First Floor Return to table of contents  
    Location: Off hallway
    Type: Full bathroom
    Shower / Tub: Shower only
    Surround type: Plastic or fiberglass
    Surround condition: Acceptabe
    Sink type: Vanity
    Number of sinks: One
    Toilet: Flushed good
    Toilet condition: Good
    Floor covering: Vinyl tile or sheet
    Floor condition: Good
    Leaks: None noted
    Ventilation type: Fan and window
    Number of outlets: One
      36) Photo

    Photo 43  
     
     
    Bathroom Second Floor Return to table of contents  
    Location: Off master bedroom
    Type: Full bathroom
    Shower / Tub: Shower with tub
    Tub is: Built in
    Surround type: Plastic or fiberglass
    Surround condition: Acceptabe
    Sink type: Vanity
    Number of sinks: One
    Toilet: Flushed good
    Toilet condition: Loose
    Floor covering: Vinyl tile or sheet
    Floor condition: Good
    Leaks: None noted
    Ventilation type: Window only
    Number of outlets: None
    Ground Fault Cercuit Interupter Outlets: No
      37) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 32  

    Photo 33  
    38) One or more toilets are loose. A qualified contractor should remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repairs if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking.
      39) One or more sinks is loose, or not securely attached to the wall behind it. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    40) One or more bathrooms with a shower do not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.
      41) The finnish coating on one or more sinks is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, chipped or worn, and/or rust on some exposed steel. However, no leaks were found due to the deterioration. The client(s) should evaluate to determine if the sinks should be replaced.

    Photo 34  
     
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents  
    Ceilings appear to be made of: Sheet rock and drop tiles
    Ceiling style: Flat
    Ceiling condition: Small cracksUpstairs
    Walls moslty appear to be made of: Sheet rock and plaster
    Wall condition: Small cracks
    Floor coverings are mostly: Wall to wall carpet
    Floor condition: Feel level
    Mostly the doors are the following types: Solid wood
    General door condition: Generally doors are in good condition
    Windows were mostly observed to be: Double hung, Single hung
    Insulated glass was noted: Most windows
    Windows appear to be made of: Vinyl
    A representative numbers of windows were tested for function: Yes
    Skylights appear to be: Operable, Were not tested
    Skylight leaks: None noted
    Overall stairs apprear in: Good condition
    Smoke detectors: No
    Carbon Monoxide detectors: No
      42) Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed in one or more areas so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.

    Photo 36  
     
      43) Guardrails are missing from stairs to basement. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. Recommend repair by a qualified contractor.
      44) Guardrails are loose and/or wobbly at top of stairs to second floor. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as installing new fasteners or hardware, installing additional fasteners and/or installing additional railing components as necessary so they are securely attached.
      45) Cover plate(s) are missing from numerous electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 40  
     
      46) Minor cracks were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 37  

    Photo 38  
      47) Some drop ceiling tiles are not properly set. Recommend these be seated properly for asthetic reasons and dust control.

    Photo 35  
     
     
    Attic Return to table of contents  
    Attic access is by: Scuttle holePartial attic over addition only
    Attic access is located: Front bedroom closet
    Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
    Roof structure type: Trusses
    Roof framing is spaced at: 24 inches
    Roof decing is constructed of: Plywood
    Moisture penetration: None noted
    Attic floor structure is: Trusses
    Attic floor decking: None
    Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Attic ventilation: None
      48) Evidence of "light to moderate" rodent infestation was found in one or more areas. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines this as less than 20 feces per square foot. Rodent infestation may be a safety hazard due to the risk of contracting Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). HPS is a rare (only 20-50 cases per year in the United states) but deadly (40% mortality rate) disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. For example, from sweeping up rodent droppings.

    Recommend following guidelines in the CDC's Clean Up, Trap Up, Seal Up article for eradicating rodents, cleaning up their waste and nesting materials, and preventing future infestations. While Hanta virus is believed to survive less than one week in droppings and urine, specific precautions should be taken during clean up. The client(s) may wish to consult with a qualified, licensed pest control operator for eliminating the infestation. A qualified licensed abatement contractor or industrial hygenist could be contacted for clean up. If the infestation was minimal, clean up of rodent waste and nesting materials in non-living spaces (crawl spaces and attics) may not be necessary, or may be performed for aesthetic reasons only (odor and appearance).

    Photo 44  
     
      49) No weatherstrip is installed around the attic access hatch. Weatherstrip should be installed around the hatch to prevent heated interior air from entering attic.
     
    Basement Return to table of contents  
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Wood, Steel
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
      50) One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.

    Photo 52  
     
      51) Ceiling light fixture is not properly attached. This could result in damage to the wiring and could be a shock hazard. Recommend repaired.

    Photo 53  
     
      52) The base of the chimney shows significant deterioration of the mortar. At present there are no missing bricks but this coule be an issue in the future.Recommend evaluation and or repair by a qualified mason.
      53) Interior foundation walls show some indications of water penetration in the past. The concrete skim coat is deteriorating and coming off. Recommend the basement area be monitored in wet weather conditions.

    Photo 45  

    Photo 46  

    Photo 54  
     
      54) Crawl space area was not entered due to insufficient room.

    Photo 48  
     
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents  
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: Top of main panel
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    System ground: Not observed.
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: No
      55) Main electric panel appears to be safely wired.

    Photo 49  
     
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents  
    Estimated age: 12 years +/-
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Electricity
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    Manufacturer: Peerless
    Model: Super Star
    Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 120 +/-
      56) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

    Photo 51  
     
     
    Plumbing Return to table of contents  
    Water pressure (psi): 30 to 50
    Location of main water shut-off valve: At pump
    Location of main fuel shut-off: At fule tank
    Visible fuel storage systems: 275 gallon tank in basement
    Water service: Private
    Service pipe material: Polyethelene
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Plastic
    Drain pipe material: Plastic
    Waste pipe material: Plastic
      57) This property has both a septic system and a water softener system, and the water softener's discharge line appears to be routed into the septic waste line. There is some debate as to whether this configuration is advisable because of the following:

  • Salt in the discharge water may kill the needed bacteria, causing sludge to build up, and possibly plugging the lines.
  • Salt may interact with clay in the leach field soil and cause the water to not disperse.
  • The discharge cycle may disturb the septic tank when it cycles (usually at night), and prevent sludge from settling, resulting in sludge escaping from the tank.
  • Marginally sized septic tanks can be overwhelmed by the volume of water during the discharge cycle and may cause sludge to escape.

    Recommend that the client(s) consult with one or more contractors who specialize in septic systems and water softeners for more information.
  •  
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents  
    Estimated age: 11 years +?-
    Primary heating system energy source: Oil
    Primary heat system type: Hot water
    Distribution system: Metal pipe
    Manufacturer: Peerless
    Last service date: Unknown
      58) Copper oil supply lines are exposed and subject to damage. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so oil supply lines are not subject to damage.
      59) Rust and/or corrosion was found in one or more areas on the oil tank. The tank may need replacing now or in the near future. Recommend having a qualified heating contractor and/or full-service oil provider evaluate and replace the oil tank if necessary.

    Photo 47  
     
      60) The last service date of this system appears to be more than two years ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than two years ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed every few years in the future, or as per the contractor's recommendations.
      61) Recommend buying oil tank replacement insurance, available from many full-service oil providers. This can cover up to 100% of the replacement costs of an oil tank and usually costs less than a few dollars per month.
      62) Picture of boiler.

    Photo 50  
     
      63) Emergency shut off for boiler is at the top of the basement stairs. There is a secondard shut off located on the left side of the boiler itself.

    Photo 56  
     
     
    Well Return to table of contents  
    Location of well equipment: Basement
    Location of tank shut off valve: At pump
      64) Rust or corrosion was found on one or more sections of pipe and/or fittings. This may cause leaks. A qualified well or plumbing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 55  
     
      65) Significant amounts of rust or corrosion were found on the pressure tank. It may be nearing the end of its useful life. A qualified plumber or well contractor should evaluate and replace the tank if necessary.
     
    Well Flow Test Return to table of contents  
    Test was started at: 11:55 AM
    Test was ended at: 1:00 PM
    Gallons per minute at start of test: 4 gallons per minute
    Pressure at start of test was: Good
    Gallons per minute at end of test: 4 gallons per minute
    Pressure at end of test was: Good
      66) A well flow test was performed. The well produced 4 gallons of water per minute for one hour. The well was functioning at the time of the inspection.
     
    Septic Dye Test Return to table of contents  
    Test was started at: 11:55 AM
    Test was ended at: 1:00 PM
    Approximate leach field location is: On the left side of the house
      67) A septic dye test was performed. Dye was introduced into the system followed by the recommended amount of water. The area believed to be the leach field was inspected. No trace of dye was found. Septic system leach field was functioning at the time of the inspection.
    NOTE: Septic dye tests do not determine the condition of the septic tank. Dye tests only determine the effectiveness of the leach field at the time of the inspection.
     
    Thank you for this opportunity to serve you and please consider me again in the future.