View as PDF

View summary

Absolute Home Inspection Services

Website: http://www.absoluteinspector.com
Email: nchomeinspector@northstate.net
Phone: (336) 906-1402
PO Box 464 
Trinity, NC 27370
Inspector: Randy Beck - NC Lic#2114

  

Home Inspection Report

Client(s):  Mr. & Mrs. Mihome
Property address:  101 Perfect Place
Anytown, NC
Inspection date:  Thrusday, October 12, 2006

This report published on Friday, March 28, 2014 4:57:18 PM EDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Crawl space
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms


General information
Return to table of contents

Report number: 18314
Structures inspected: Single Family Home
Age of building: 29 yrs (1977)
Property owner's name: John & Jane Doe
Time started: 9:00 am
Time finished: 12:15pm
Inspection Fee: $500.00
Payment method: Invoiced
Present during inspection: Client(s)
Occupied: No, but furnishings and stored items are present
Weather conditions: Partly cloudy
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Wet
Front of structure faces: Southwest
Main entrance faces: Northeast
Foundation type: Crawlspace
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Security system, Low voltage outdoor lighting
Exterior
Return to table of contents

Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Concrete block
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Expanded insulation foam system (EIFS)
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: N/A
Exterior door material: Solid core wood
1) Cracks, deterioration and/or damage were found in one or more areas of the expanded foam insulation system (EIFS) siding. A qualified contractor who specializes in this material should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
Photo
Photo 1-1
Photo
Photo 1-2

2) The concrete patio on the southwest side of the house has settled approximately 1". Subsquently a gap around the perimeter exist that may allow water to deteriorate the wood structure of the home. A qualified concrete specialist should be consulted for solutions, such as adding a thin layer of concrete, installing pavers or stones to the existing surface, etc.
Photo
Photo 2-1
 

3) The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.
Photo
Photo 3-1
 

4) One or more window(s) have damage or deterioration and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.
Photo
Photo 4-1
Photo
Photo 4-2

5) One or more wood trim pieces that comes in close contact with the ground or concrete surfaces, has deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.
Photo
Photo 5-1
below french doors at patio
Photo
Photo 5-2
wood trim around garage door opening

6) The exterior finish on many of the windows and doors is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 6-1
Photo
Photo 6-2

Roof
Return to table of contents

Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground
Roof type: Cross-hipped
Roof covering: Metal
Estimated age of roof: 10 years
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Adequate
7) One or more metal roof seam covers have come loose and may result in damage to the roof sub-structure. A qualified roofing contractor should make repairs to restore the integrity of the roofing system.
Photo
Photo 7-1
Photo
Photo 7-2
Photo
Photo 7-3
 

Attic
Return to table of contents

Inspection method: Traversed
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
Insulation depth: 6"
Insulation estimated R value: R-19
Electric service
Return to table of contents

Primary service type: Underground
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 150
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: Laundry room
Location of sub panels: One sub panel in the laundry room beside main panel, and one sub panel in crawl space.
Location of main disconnect: Top bank of breakers in main service panel (split bus)
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
Main disconnect rating (amps): Not applicable, no single main disconnect
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
Smoke detectors present: Yes
8) One or more loose conductors in the main service panel have bare ends and are not connected to an overcurrent protection device (circuit breakers or fuses). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire if the bare conductors come into contact with other components in the panel. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, removing wires that aren't terminated or installing wire nuts.
Photo
Photo 8-1
 

9) One or more knockouts have been removed inside the main service panel where no wires and bushings are installed, and no breaker(s) have been installed to seal the hole(s). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. A qualified electrician should install knockout covers where missing.
Photo
Photo 9-1
 

Water heater
Return to table of contents

Estimated age: 10 to 15 years
Type: Tank
Energy source: Electricity
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Manufacturer: Rheem Two identical units installed
Model: 818V40D
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 130
10) The hot water temperature is greater than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of scalding. The thermostat should be adjusted so the water temperature doesn't exceed 120 degrees. For more information on scalding dangers, visit http://www.tap-water-burn.com/
Heating and cooling
Return to table of contents

Estimated age: 7 Yrs
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas and a 2 ton heat pump for second floor
Primary heat system type: Forced air
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Primary Air conditioning type: Package system
Distribution system: Flexible ducts
Manufacturer: Trane
Model: YCX048G1H0AA (second floor TWR024C100A5)
Filter location: Behind return air grill
11) A return air opening was found in the crawl space. This situation allows unconditioned air to be drawn into the system, thereby reducing the efficiency and comfort capacity of the system. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
Photo
Photo 11-1
 

12) One or more sections of flex duct are sagging excessively. The flex duct pictured is below the laundry room area and it also has water trapped inside. Most manufacturers, and the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association (SMACNA) recommend that this type of duct sag no more than 1/2" per foot between supports. A qualified heating/cooling contractor should evaluate remove water, and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 12-1
 

Plumbing and laundry
Return to table of contents

Water pressure (psi): 120 psi
Location of main water shut-off valve: Crawl space
Location of main water meter: not located
Location of main fuel shut-off: meter
Visible fuel storage systems: none
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Not visible
Supply pipe material: Copper
Vent pipe material: Cast iron
Drain pipe material: Cast iron
Waste pipe material: Cast iron
13) The water supply pressure is greater than 80 psi. Pressures above 80 psi may void warranties for some appliances such as water heaters or washing machines. Flexible supply lines to washing machines are more likely to burst with higher pressures. Typically the pressure cannot be regulated at the water meter. Recommend having a qualified plumber evaluate and make modifications to reduce the pressure below 80 psi. Installing a pressure reducing valve on the main service pipe is a common solution to this problem. If one exists, then it should be adjusted for lower pressures.
14) The clothes dryer exhaust duct is broken or disconnected in one or more places. Clothes dryers produce large amounts of moisture which should not enter structure interiors. Damage to building components may result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html
Photo
Photo 14-1
Photo
Photo 14-2

Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Return to table of contents

Fireplace type: Masonry with gas heating appliance installed
Chimney type: Masonry
Crawl space
Return to table of contents

Inspection method: Traversed
Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
Pier or support post material: Masonry
Beam material: Built up wood
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
Vapor barrier present: Yes
15) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
Photo
Photo 15-1
 

16) The inspector was unable to test the sump pump for one or more reasons (no source of water, appeared unsafe, no power, etc.). The sump pump well or "bucket" is not set low enough for water to flow into it. A qualified plumber should evaluate and position the container to remove unwanted water as quickly as possible once it has entered the crawl space.The sump pump was not fully evaluated.
Photo
Photo 16-1
 

17) Standing water was found in one or more sections of the crawl space. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the crawl space. A qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in crawl spaces include:

Ideally, water should not enter crawl spaces, but if water must be controlled after it enters the crawl space, then typical repairs include installing trenches, drains and/or sump pump(s) in the crawl space.
Photo
Photo 17-1
Photo
Photo 17-2
Photo
Photo 17-3
 

18) Insulation under the floor in the crawlspace is damaged, deteriorated, or has fallen down. A qualified contractor should make repairs as necessary to restore the insulation to its original rating.
Photo
Photo 18-1
 

19) A 4"x4" support post in the craw space is positioned improperly and may cause the sub-floor to separate from the floor joist. A qualified contractor should evaluate the purpose for the additional support and correctly position it under the floor joist if it is necessary for support.
Photo
Photo 19-1
 

Kitchen
Return to table of contents


20) The microwave oven appears to be inoperable. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this, and if necessary, the microwave oven should be replaced, or a qualified appliance technician should evaluate and repair. (microwave in laundry room)
21) The oven bake controls appears to be inoperable or at least not fully functional. The breaker in the electrical service panel had to be tripped to shut off the baking function. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this, and if necessary, a qualified appliance technician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Bathrooms
Return to table of contents


22) One or more faucets leak by handle(s) or at their base when turned on. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary. (cold water handle at right lavatory in master bath)
23) The bath tub faucet was inoperable in the second floor bath above stairwell. A qualified plumber should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
24) Tile and/or grout in one or more showers is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, deteriorated or missing grout, cracked, missing or loose tiles, etc. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair tile and/or grout as necessary.
Photo
Photo 24-1
 

Interior rooms
Return to table of contents


25) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
Photo
Photo 25-1
 

26) One or more doors bind in their jamb and cannot be closed and latched, or are difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors. (door to equipment area in attic, second floor)
27) Ground water is seeping into the floor of the garage to house connector room. Water in contact with wood surfaces causes swelling, deterioration, discoloring, and damp musty odor. Water intrusion should be addressed first and then repairs to damaged wood should be completed.
Photo
Photo 27-1
Photo
Photo 27-2

28) One or more locksets are loose and should be tightened, repaired and or replaced as necessary.
29) One or more tile(s) are loose in the foyer area. A qualified tile installer should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
Thank you for choosing Absolute Home Inspection Services.