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ABR INSPECTION SERVICE

 

Home Inspection Report

Client(s):  Randolph Ballard
Property address:  2321 Overlook
Youngstown, Ohio 44509
Inspection date:  Friday, July 08, 2016

This report published on Friday, July 08, 2016 10:32:18 PM EDT

ABR Inspection Service
133 Como St
Struthers, Ohio 44471
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor Defect
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms


General information
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Report number: 07/08/16-2
Structures inspected: house, garage
Time started: 5pm
Time finished: 6:30pm
Inspection Fee: 250
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Client(s)
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Hot, 86
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: North
Main entrance faces: North
Foundation type: Unfinished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Security system

Exterior
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Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Metal
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete

1) One or more outside faucets are missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/BODY_AE079
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Photo 1-1
freeze proof faucet needed
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Photo 1-2
freeze proof faucet needed

2) Soffit boards are damaged or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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Photo 2-1
soffit loose from roof leak
 

3) Conducive conditions The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.
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Photo 3-1
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Photo 3-2
extremely low grade rear of house
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Photo 3-3
low grade rear- this may cause foundation damage
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Photo 3-4

4) Conducive conditions One or more downspouts are loose or detached. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary so downspouts are securely anchored and functional.
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Photo 4-1
missing downspout
 

5) Conducive conditions One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.

6) Conducive conditions Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
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Photo 6-1
keep shrubs pruned back
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Photo 6-2
prune back against house
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Photo 6-3
prune back shrubs
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Photo 6-4
prune back
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Photo 6-5
prune back
 

7) Conducive conditions Window glazing putty at one or more windows is missing and/or deteriorated. Putty should be replaced and/or installed where necessary. For more information on replacing window putty, visit: http://www.oldhouseweb.com/stories/Detailed/12216.shtml
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Photo 7-1
damaged windows all glazing missing all windows need reglazed.
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Photo 7-2
glazing missing all windows - safety glass will fall out or break.
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Photo 7-3
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8) Conducive conditions Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit The Ins and Outs of Caulking.

9) Conducive conditions The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.
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Photo 9-1
refinish door jamb
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Photo 9-2
refinish or replace windows all need reglazed .

10) Stains were found in one or more areas on soffit boards, but no elevated moisture levels were found and the wood appears to be in good condition. Based on the appearance of the roof, these stains may be from past leaks. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future. If moisture is observed, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

11) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

Roof
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Roof inspection method: Traversed, Viewed from ground with binoculars
Roof type: Gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles, Rolled
Estimated age of roof: 20
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Inadequate, attic too hot

12) Conducive conditions The coating on the flat roof has deteriorated and wood damage has occurred, extensive repairs needed
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Photo 12-1
flat roof poor condition, some rafters may need replaced, roof needs stripped off and all new wood
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Photo 12-2
flat roof damage
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Photo 12-3
damage replace
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Photo 12-7
 

13) Conducive conditions The roof surface material appears to be near the end of its service life and will likely need replacing in the near future, even with repairs. The client(s) should budget for a replacement roof surface, and may want to have a qualified roofing contractor evaluate and attempt to issue a "5 year roof certificate".

14) Conducive conditions One or more sections of flashing at the base of the chimney are deteriorated and/or substandard. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 14-1
flashing in poor condition very rusty
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Photo 14-2
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Photo 14-3
 

15) Conducive conditions One or more composition shingles are damaged, deteriorated and/or missing, and should be replaced. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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Photo 15-1
missing shingle rear of house
 

16) Conducive conditions Roofing nails in one or more areas have loosened or backed out. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as reseating nails and applying sealant.

17) Conducive conditions One or more composition shingles have raised, most likely due to nails that have loosened. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as reseating nails.

18) Conducive conditions One or more "rubber boot" flashings are damaged or deteriorated and may result in leaks or vermin intrusion. A qualified contractor should replace flashings where necessary.
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Photo 18-1
pipes are tarred evidence of previous water leaks.
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Photo 18-2
tarred pipe
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Photo 18-3
electric mast rusty failing
 

Garage
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19) The garage-house door poses a fire risk because it's not fire-rated (metal or solid-core construction). A qualified contractor should replace this door with a fire-rated door.
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Photo 19-1
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Photo 19-2
gaps at basement door

Attic
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Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
Insulation estimated R value: R15

20) Some wiring is loose, unsupported, or inadequately supported. Standard building practices require non-metallic sheathed wiring to be trimmed to length, attached to runners or to solid backing with fasteners at intervals of 4-1/2 ft. or less. Fasteners should be installed within 12 inches of all enclosures. A qualified, licensed electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, trim wire to length and/or install staples as needed.
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Photo 20-1
loose wiring in attic should be cleaned up.
 

21) Conducive conditions One or more exhaust fan ducts are broken and/or have fallen down, or somehow terminate in the attic. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary and as per standard building practices, so all exhaust air is vented outside.
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Photo 21-1
exhaust duct terminated in attic - safety
 

22) Conducive conditions One or more exhaust fan ducts terminate in attic because no vent cap is installed at the roof or exterior wall surfaces. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install vent caps where missing and as per standard building practices, so all exhaust air is vented outside.

23) Ceiling insulation is uneven in some areas. This is likely due to someone having walked on or through the insulation. Recommend installing additional insulation where necessary to restore the original R rating.
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Photo 23-1
attic fiberglass insulation low in some areas
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Photo 23-2
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Photo 23-3
 

24) No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.

Electric service
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Primary service type: Overhead
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 100
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: top of panel
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
System ground: Cold water supply pipes
Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: Can't verify
Smoke detectors present: No

25) One or more wires in the main service panel appear to be undersized for their overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. A qualified electrian should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Photo 25-1
inside service panel undersize wire , wires loose not capped , main service cable frayed in some spots. consult with a certified electrician.
 

26) The main service panel cover is installed so it is not flush with the surface of the panel box and disconnect devices. Gaps exist, resulting in exposed wiring. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified contractor and/or electrician should evaluate and repair so the panel cover fits on the panel box as the manufacturer intended.
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Photo 26-1
damaged service panel door - replace
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Photo 26-2

27) Exposed wiring and/or bus bars exist in the main service panel due to closure covers missing (slots where circuit breakers fit through the panel cover). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. Closure covers should be installed where missing to eliminate exposed wiring, and by a qualified electrician if necessary..
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Photo 27-1
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Photo 27-2
SAFETY
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Photo 27-3
door broken no latch.
 

Water heater
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Estimated age: 2013
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): turned off

28) Temperature-pressure relief valve drain line is too short. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified plumber should extend the drain line to 6 inches from the floor, or route it so as to drain outside.
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Photo 28-1
hot water tank 2013
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Photo 28-2
drain line too short HWT

Heating and cooling
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Estimated age: 1987
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
Manufacturer: Carrier
Model: 80%
Filter location: In return air duct below furnace
Last service date: unknown

29) Because of the age and/or condition of this furnace, recommend that a qualified heating and cooling technician inspect the heat exchanger and perform a Carbon Monoxide test when it's serviced.
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Photo 29-1
inside furnace very dirty needs professionally cleaned and tuned.
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Photo 29-2
service furnace age 1987 near end of life cycle - should be also inspected by a professional heating contractor to make sure unit will work future use.
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Photo 29-3
furnace
 

30) The estimated useful life for forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

31) The last service date of this system appears to be more than two years ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than two years ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed every few years in the future, or as per the contractor's recommendations.

32) The filter(s) for the heating/cooling system should be checked monthly and replaced or washed as necessary.

Plumbing and laundry
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Water pressure (psi): 80
Location of main water shut-off valve: basement
Location of main water meter: basement
Location of main fuel shut-off: basement
Visible fuel storage systems: none
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Copper
Supply pipe material: Copper
Vent pipe material: Galvanized steel
Drain pipe material: Galvanized steel
Waste pipe material: Galvanized steel

33) The clothes dryer is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information on dryer safety issues, see http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html
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Photo 33-1
solid dryer vent needed
 

34) Conducive conditions Some, of the water supply pipes in this structure are made of galvanized steel. Based on the age of this structure, corrosion, leaks, and/or the results of a "functional flow test" performed during the inspection, some or all of these pipes appear to have exceeded their estimated useful life of 40 to 60 years. During a functional flow test, multiple fixtures are run simultaneously to determine if the flow is adequate. For example, if the shower flow decreases substantially when the toilet is flushed. Internal corrosion and rust can reduce the inside diameter of these pipes over time, resulting in reduced flow and leaks. A qualified plumber should evaluate and replace supply pipes and fittings as necessary.
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Photo 34-1
shower is corroded , galvanized pipe leaking needs replaced.
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Photo 34-2
shower little to no pressure

35) Conducive conditions Pin holes and/or corrosion were visible on one or more areas of copper water supply pipes. This most often occurs with acid water with a pH of less than 6.5. Leaks may result because of this. A qualified plumber should evaluate and replace water supply components as necessary. The client(s) should consult with a qualified plumber regarding the possibility of acidic water, and what solutions may be available to neutralize the pH.
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Photo 35-1
replace corroded valves
 

36) One or more main waste pipe cleanouts show signs of wear from having been opened, possibly multiple times. Clogging and/or damage to the waste system may have occurred in the past. The client(s) should be aware that they are responsible for repairs to the side sewer line, and usually for the publicly owned lateral line. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) regarding past repairs, and/or have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair as necessary. A video scope device may be used to inspect these lines and to determine if they have been damaged. Repairs are often expensive due to the need for excavation.
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Photo 36-1
piope and cleanout very rusty- clean recoat or replace
 

37) Conducive conditions Stains were found in one or more sections of drain and/or waste pipes. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future, and if leaks are found, have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair as necessary. Alternatively, the client(s) may wish to have a qualified plumber evaluate now and repair if necessary.

38) Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.

Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
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Fireplace type: Masonry
Chimney type: Masonry

39) A significant amount of creosote (1/8 inch or more) is visible in the fireplace flue. A qualified chimney service contractor should inspect, clean, and repair if necessary now and annually in the future.
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Photo 39-1
fireplace needs professionally cleaned.
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Photo 39-2

Basement
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Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
Pier or support post material: Steel
Beam material: Steel
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists

40) Guardrails are missing from one or more sections of decks or elevated surfaces with high drop-offs. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. Standard building practices require guardrails to be installed at drop-offs higher than 30 inches, but in some cases it is advised to install them at shorter drop-offs. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install guardrails as necessary and as per standard building practices.
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Photo 40-1
steps to basement needs guardrails open sides
 

41) Conducive conditions Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. For example, water stains and/or efflorescence on the foundation or floor, water stains at bases of support posts, etc. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.
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Photo 41-1
mildew mold back wall of basement
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Photo 41-2
mold mildew
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Photo 41-3
water staining on floor in basement
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Photo 41-4
mildew previous water seepage
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Photo 41-5
water stains
 

Kitchen
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42) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
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Photo 42-1
GFI needed kitchen
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Photo 42-2
GFI needed

43) DOne or more sinks are clogged or drain slowly. Drain(s) should be cleared as necessary, and by a qualified plumber if necessary.
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Photo 43-1
slow drain
 

Bathrooms
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44) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

45)  
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Photo 45-1
seal behind spout.
 

Interior rooms
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46) Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 10 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit this article: NFPA urges replacing home smoke alarms after 10 years.
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Photo 46-1
old smoke alarm replace and move to below bottom of steps.
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Photo 46-2
missing smoke alarm

47) An insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

48) Carpeting in one or more rooms is loose. Recommend having a qualified carpeting installation contractor restretch carpet as necessary.
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Photo 48-1
carpet needs restretched.
 


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decay wood at garage frame
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low grade
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paint peeling door
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service meter 60 amp with 100 amp main breaker , splices are not permanently connected at weather head. replace service meter and box.- safety
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roof view
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replace open and damaged outlet in basement
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corner of wall shows mildew and chalking
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spliced wires for ac - safety
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service meter
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galvanized lines used for gas
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GFI needed by laundry
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house to garage door not fire rated , gaps seen .- safety
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switch not controlling anything
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connections not permanent.
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meter undersized
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microwave use of an extension not code , outlet should be installed above unit with no extension cord.
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ABR HOME INSPECTION SERVICE