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ABR Home Inspections

 

Home Inspection Report

Client(s):  Kathleen Lewis
Property address:  1685 Tanglewood
Liberty, Ohio
Inspection date:  Friday, May 19, 2017

This report published on Friday, May 19, 2017 9:52:58 PM EDT

ABR Inspection Service
133 Como St
Struthers, Ohio 44471
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor Defect
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Basement
Well
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms

View summary


General information
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Report number: 05-19-17-(2)
Time started: 4PM
Time finished: 5:30PM
Inspection Fee: 300
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Client(s)
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Cool
Front of structure faces: North
Foundation type: Unfinished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Security system

1) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html

Exterior
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Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood clapboard
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core wood

2) One or more outside faucets are missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/BODY_AE079
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Photo 2-1
not secure and should have vacuum and freeze proof.
 

3) Conducive conditions One or more gutters are poorly sloped so that significant amounts of water accumulate in them rather than draining through the downspouts. This can cause gutters to overflow, especially when organic debris such as leaves or needles have accumulated in them. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as correcting the slope in gutters or installing additional downspouts and extensions if necessary.
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Photo 3-1
gutter sagging full of debris and water
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Photo 3-2
full of debris and water

4) Conducive conditions The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.
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Photo 4-1
very low grade rear of house
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Photo 4-2
low grade
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Photo 4-3
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Photo 4-4
hole at side of garage seal with concrete and grade.
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Photo 4-5
 

5) Conducive conditions One or more downspouts are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should install downspout(s) where missing. Also recommend installing extensions such as splashblocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines as necessary to carry rainwater away from the house.
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Photo 5-1
leaking and no downspout rear.
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Photo 5-2
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Photo 5-3
clogged all gutters.
 

6) Conducive conditions One or more gutters were leaking during the inspection. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should replace or repair gutters where necessary.

The gutter guard is contributing to excessive water seepage into the foundation and thus may be causing mold around perimeter of basement or lower room walls. the water has been noticed upon rains to go over the gutter rather than travel to the downspout. Damage to grade and window components are evident. as a result it is recommended to remove the water fall guard and install a screen type guard.
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Photo 6-1
leaking gutter
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Photo 6-2
leaking

7) One or more moderate cracks (1/8 inch to 3/4 inch) were found in the foundation. These may be a structural concern, or an indication that settlement is ongoing. The client(s) should consider hiring qualified contractors and/or engineers as necessary for further evaluation. Such contractors may include:
  • Foundation repair contractors who may prescribe repairs, and will give cost estimates for prescribed repairs
  • Masonry contractors who repair and/or replace brick veneer
  • Geotechnical engineers who attempt to determine if settlement is ongoing, and what the cause of the settlement is
  • Structural engineers who determine if repairs are necessary, and prescribe those repairs

  • At a minimum, recommend sealing cracks to prevent water infiltration. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.

8) Conducive conditions Window glazing putty at one or more windows is missing and/or deteriorated. Putty should be replaced and/or installed where necessary. For more information on replacing window putty, visit: http://www.oldhouseweb.com/stories/Detailed/12216.shtml
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Photo 8-1
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Photo 8-2
wood starting to decay interior windows
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Photo 8-3
above window needs protected from elements.
 

9) Conducive conditions The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.
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Photo 9-1
paint peeling on siding.
 

Roof
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Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars
Roof type: Gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Estimated age of roof: 5
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Adequate

10) Conducive conditions Trees are overhanging roof and are within 10 feet of roof vertically. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since organic debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate on the roof surface. Accumulated debris may cause water to enter gaps in the roof surface and leak into attic and/or interior spaces. Trees should be pruned so they are at least 10 feet above roof, or don't overhang the roof.

11)   ROOF SATISFACTORY

Garage
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12) Extension cords are being used as permanent wiring in one or more areas. They should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring poses a fire and shock hazard, and is an indication that wiring is inadequate and should be updated. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure, resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, and sparks that could start a fire. Extension cords should be removed as necessary, or a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install additional circuits and/or electric receptacles.
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Photo 12-1
extension cord being used for opener in garage should be plugged directly into outlet.
 

13) The garage-house door poses a fire risk because it's not fire-rated (metal or solid-core construction). A qualified contractor should replace this door with a fire-rated door.
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Photo 13-1
house to garage door not fire rated.
 

14) One or more exterior entrance doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.
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Photo 14-1
large gap at rear garage door.
 

Attic
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Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
Insulation depth: 3
Insulation estimated R value: R11

15) Some wiring is loose, unsupported, or inadequately supported. Standard building practices require non-metallic sheathed wiring to be trimmed to length, attached to runners or to solid backing with fasteners at intervals of 4-1/2 ft. or less. Fasteners should be installed within 12 inches of all enclosures. A qualified, licensed electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, trim wire to length and/or install staples as needed.
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Photo 15-1
attic low insulation needs additional 3.5 inches
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Photo 15-2
loose wire needs supported.

16) The ceiling insulation's R rating is significantly less than what's recommended for this area. Recommend having a qualified contractor install additional insulation as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency.
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Photo 16-1
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Photo 16-2
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Photo 16-3
 

17) Ceiling insulation is missing in some areas. Recommend installing insulation where missing for better energy efficiency.

Electric service
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Primary service type: Overhead
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 100
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: top of panel
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
System ground: Cold water supply pipes
Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: Can't verify
Smoke detectors present: No

18)  
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Photo 18-1
service panel satisfactory been upgraded.
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Photo 18-2
service meter

Water heater
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Estimated age: newer
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Manufacturer: Rheem
Model: 80 %
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 100

19)  
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Photo 19-1
HWT Rheem satisfactory
 

Heating and cooling
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Estimated age: 15+
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
Manufacturer: Trane
Model: 90 %
Filter location: In return air duct below furnace

20) Significant amounts of rust or corrosion were found on one or more gas supply pipes. Based on this deterioration, the wrong materials may have been used. For example, black iron pipe may have been used where galvanized iron pipe should have been used instead. Leaks may occur as a result. This is a safety hazard. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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Photo 20-1
corrosion inside furnace
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Photo 20-2
inside furnace severely rusted.

21) Significant amounts of debris, dirt and/or dust are visible in one or more sections of supply and/or return air ducts. This can be a health hazard, especially for those with allergies or respiratory problems. The Environmental Protection Association (EPA) recommends considering having ducts professionally cleaned when "ducts are clogged with excessive amounts of dust and debris and/or particles are actually released into the home from your supply registers". At a minimum, the visible debris should be thoroughly cleaned. Recommend having a qualified contractor clean the ducts. For more information on duct cleaning in relation to indoor air quality, visit: http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/airduct.html

22) The estimated useful life for forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
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Photo 22-1
Furnace brand trane needs serviced cleaned and tuned.
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Photo 22-2

23) The last service date of this system appears to be more than two years ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than two years ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed every few years in the future, or as per the contractor's recommendations.

24) The air handler's filter(s) are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be replaced.
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Photo 24-1
filter clogged and dirty
 

25)  
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Photo 25-1
HWT flue pipe needs more elevation for proper draft.
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Photo 25-2
seal around chimney

Plumbing and laundry
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Water pressure (psi): 80
Location of main water shut-off valve: basement
Location of main water meter: basement
Location of main fuel shut-off: basement
Visible fuel storage systems: none
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Copper
Supply pipe material: Copper
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Plastic

26) Conducive conditions Pin holes and/or corrosion were visible on one or more areas of copper water supply pipes. This most often occurs with acid water with a pH of less than 6.5. Leaks may result because of this. A qualified plumber should evaluate and replace water supply components as necessary. The client(s) should consult with a qualified plumber regarding the possibility of acidic water, and what solutions may be available to neutralize the pH.
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Photo 26-1
valve corroded replace in basment
 

Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
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Fireplace type: Masonry
Chimney type: Masonry

27) A significant amount of creosote (1/8 inch or more) is visible in the fireplace flue. A qualified chimney service contractor should inspect, clean, and repair if necessary now and annually in the future.
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Photo 27-1
inside lower fireplace very dirty and creosote , needs professionally cleaned both upper and lower.
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Photo 27-2
damper rusted.
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Photo 27-3
rusted.
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Photo 27-4
inside first floor fireplace very dirty- creosote
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Photo 27-5
firebrick has gaps- safety
 

28) One or more chimney flues do not have a screened cover installed. Screened covers prevent the following:
  • Fire hazard from wood fire sparks and embers exiting flues
  • Wildlife (birds, rodents, raccoons, etc.) entering flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

A qualified chimney service contractor should install screened cover(s) where missing. Screens should have holes 1/4 inch or larger.

29) All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.

30)  
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Photo 30-1
chimney should have caps
 

Basement
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Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
Pier or support post material: Steel
Beam material: Steel
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists

31) One or more flights of stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.

32) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
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Photo 32-1
open cover and non grounded plug.
 

33) Conducive conditions Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. For example, water stains and/or efflorescence on the foundation or floor, water stains at bases of support posts, etc. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.
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Photo 33-1
mold and water staining
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Photo 33-2
water stains on basement floor in several areas.
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Photo 33-3
mold
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Photo 33-4
open hole in basmenet should be sealed .
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Photo 33-5
stress cracks in block.
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Photo 33-6
staining at wall
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Photo 33-7
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Photo 33-8
water staining at corner and should be filled with concrete exposure to exterior.
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Photo 33-9
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Photo 33-10
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Photo 33-11
damp conditions in basement caused include missing downspout and very low grade.
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Photo 33-12
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Photo 33-13
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Photo 33-14
paint peeling on basment floor.
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Photo 33-15
inside garage mold and water staining cause may be grade and hole in foundation shown on exterior side.
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Photo 33-16

34)  
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Photo 34-1
GFI needed in basement , non- grounded plug
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Photo 34-2
open joint fill with concrete.

Well
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35) Recommend having the well water tested for coliform bacteria, nitrates, and anything else of local concern, by a qualified lab. For more information, visit http://www.wellowner.org

36) Rust, corrosion and leaks were found in pipes and/or fittings. A qualified well or plumbing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 36-1
well pump
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Photo 36-2
corrosion on well pump
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Photo 36-3
Leaking at time of inspection , pump is very corroded replacement may be needed.
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Photo 36-4
tank ok

Kitchen
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37)   satisfactory

Bathrooms
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38) Conducive conditions Tile and/or grout around one or more sink is damaged or deteriorated. For example, deteriorated or missing grout, cracked, missing or loose tiles, etc. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair tile and/or grout as necessary.
Photo
Photo 38-1
seal around sink caulking is cracking
 

39) Conducive conditions One or more bathrooms with a shower do not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathrooms with showers.
Photo
Photo 39-1
no exhaust fan installed both bathrooms.
 

Interior rooms
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40) No smoke alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. A qualified electrician should install smoke alarms as per standard building practices (functioning one exists in hallways leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom, etc.). For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

41) Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.

42) One or more deadbolt mechanisms are inoperable or difficult to operate. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

43) One or more sliding glass doors are difficult to open or close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace door(s) as necessary.

44) One or more windows that were built to open, will not open, or open only minimally due to their being painted shut, damaged and/or deteriorated in some way. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary so windows open fully, and open and close easily.

45) Minor cracks were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
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Photo 45-1
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Photo 45-2
bathroom ceiling cracking use quality sealantat and refinish.
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Photo 45-3
 

46) Minor cracks were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
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Photo 46-1
below window stress crack- monitor.
 

47)  
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Photo 47-1
mold in small bath in shower area. cause may be no exhaust fan.
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Photo 47-2
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Photo 47-3
vent should be exhaust fan
 


Photo
Photo X-1
close cleanout
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Photo X-2
Junction box corroded.
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Photo X-3
insulation needed perimeter of basement
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Photo X-4
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Photo X-5
replace.
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Photo X-6
paint peeling most windows.
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Photo X-7
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Photo X-8
replace door with more secure and efficient door.
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Photo X-9
100 amp
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Photo X-10
non grounded plug
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Photo X-11
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Photo X-12
damage in closet drywall
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Photo X-13
stored wood - infestation possible.
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Photo X-14
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Photo X-15
keep trees pruned back from house
 

ABR HOME INSPECTION SERVICE