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Abode Home Inspection

Website: http://www.ahinspection.com
Email: dom@ahinspection.com
Inspector's email: dom@ahinspection.com
Phone: (917) 337-7911
Medford NY 11763-2404 

Inspector: Domenic Mozzone
16000042221

  

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Todd Kearney
Property address: 115 Roy St.
Massapequa, NY 11758
Inspection date: 2/17/2012
This report published on Friday, February 17, 2012 9:39:50 PM EST

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms. Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 12-015
Inspector's name: Domenic Mozzone
Structures inspected: 115 Roy Street
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 55 ( 1956 )
Time started: 10:15
Time finished: 12:45
Present during inspection: Client(s), Property owner(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Partly cloudy
Temperature: Cool45 degrees
Ground condition: Wet
Front of structure faces: NorthNE
Main entrance faces: NorthNE
Foundation type: Finished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Security system, Irrigation system
1) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
2) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)
     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Footing material: Poured in place concrete
    Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Wall covering: Cement-asbestos shingles
    Driveway material: Porous pavers
    Sidewalk material: N/A
    Exterior door material: Solid core wood
    3) One or more deck ledger boards are nailed to the structure rather than being attached by adequate fasteners. This poses a safety hazard since the ledger board(s) may separate from the structure, causing the deck(s) to collapse. A qualified contractor should install lag screws or bolts as per standard building practices to securely attach the ledger board(s) to the structure. For more information on installing deck ledger boards visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=installing+a+ledger+board

    And for more information on building safe decks in general, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=building+a+safe+deck

    4) Handrails are missing from the front entry steps. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling, when more then two steps are present for a rise a railing should be installed. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install guardrails as necessary and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 4  
    Outside entry steps with more than two risers should have railings to prevent accidents; where space exists barriers can be placed to prevent falls in lieu of railings, e.g., planters.
     

    5) Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed in one or more areas so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, refastening the wire using the appropriate fasteners, or re-routing where necessary.
    Additionally there is a junction box that has a missing cover with exposed wiring that needs to be closed up to prevent shock while in the crawlspace.

    Photo 24  
    Insulation is beginning to detach from the floor beams in the crawl space and needs to be replaced to capture proper insulation R value. Loose hanging wiring also needs to be attached to the beams to prevent their movement upon working in this space and electrical shock.

    Photo 25  
    This junction box is in the crawlspace and requires a cover to prevent shock while working in this space.

    Photo 26  
    This cable must be fastened to the above beams and routed in a way that it will not be touched when working in the crawlspace. Continued movement of electrical wiring can lead to frayed insulation from rubbing against surfaces and/or electrical shock. This is an easy fix to avoid future problems. Additionally, a vent should be placed through the access door to reduce moisture which causes insulation deterioration.
     

    6) Flashing is missing from above one or more deck ledger boards. This can cause moisture to accumulate between the ledger board(s) and the structure. Rot may result in this area and cause the ledger board fasteners to fail. The deck may separate from the structure in this event and poses a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install flashing above ledger board(s) where necessary. For more information on installing deck ledger boards visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=installing+a+ledger+board

    And for more information on building safe decks in general, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=building+a+safe+deck

    7) There is a soffit section that should be refastened to prevent further damage.

    Photo 9  
     

    8) The rear yard electric receptacle had no power. I asked the property owner to verify the circuit breakers and he advised me that one was thrown that he reset while I was there; when checked again it still had no power. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    9) Two downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.

    Photo 8  
    These downspouts are emptying out along side the house and need to be directed away at least 3' for proper drainage.
     

    10) Wood beams, joists and/or support posts are too close to the soil in some areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require the following clearances to soil below:

  • 12 inches between beams and the soil below
  • 18 inches between joists and the soil below
  • 6 inches between support post bases and the soil below

    Efforts should be made, such as grading and/or removing soil, to maintain these clearances. If this is not practical, then installing borate based Impel rods may help to prevent infestation and damage. For more information, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=impel+rods

    Photo 12  
    These support beams are encapsulated with earth which shortens their life cycle considerably; they should be at least 6" above grade. As per the information provided regarding this issue plans should be made to remedy this to avoid premature deterioration of the deck support posts.

    Photo 13  
    Deck support post going below grade.

    11) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply).
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair).

    Photo 7  
    One minor visible crack was observed on the side of the house which is easily correctable.
     

    12) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

    Photo 5  
    The ivy growing up the side of the house should be removed to prevent insect infestation.
     

    13) Recommend cleaning deck(s) and treating with a preservative claiming to waterproof, block ultraviolet light, and stop mildew. Consumer Reports recommends these products:

  • Cabot Decking Stain and PTW Stain
  • Olympic Water Repellent Deck Stain
  • Thompson's House and Deck Stain
  • Wolman PTW Deck Stain
  • Akzo Sikkens Cetol DEK
  • Benjamin Moore Moorwood Clear Wood Finish
  • DAP Woodlife Premium
  • Olympic Natural Look Protector Plus
    14)   The rear side fencing is no longer serviceable and will need eventual replacement.

    Photo 6  
    The operation of this door difficult as its alignment with support posts that need to be adjusted. This is a minor repair.

    Photo 10  
    Based on the installation of this fence it appears to be with this residence and needs to be replaced; this section of fencing is not salvageable.

    Photo 11  
    Based on the installation of this fence it appears to be with this residence and needs to be replaced; this section of fencing is not salvageable.
     

    15)  

    Photo 3  
    Garage frame capping is damaged and should be repaired to prevent vermin entry and water damage. This is a minor fix with exterior aluminum capping.

    Photo 14  
    The patio bricks have settled and created trip hazards. The resetting of these bricks will remedy this situation.

    16)  

    Photo 15  
    The skylights above the deck area are old plastic domed type that are completely fogged from the weather. When changing them is desired consideration should be given to replacing with glass.

    Photo 22  
    Electric service has an appropriate drip loop attached installation.
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Cross gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    17) There is a section of the exterior wall visible on the roof only which is positioned under a soffit that has missing siding and exposed bare sheathing. This must be remedied ASAP as drifting snow and/or driving rain will penetrate the home interior causing water damage. Additionally, there is ample space for insects to penetrate this home from this missing siding section of wall.

    Photo 19  
    There are penetrable areas for insects to easily nest until this is corrected.

    Photo 20  
    Area of missing siding..

    18) The chimney requires pointing at its top section.

    Photo 16  
    Overall the chimney is in good shape, the exception being the top 4 coarse of bricks which need to be pointed. Additionally, the removal of the antenna will prevent further damage as it is rusted substantially. The antenna straps surrounding the chimney also should be removed.

    Photo 17  
    Pointing requirement evidenced at top layers of brick.

    Photo 18  
    The flashing around the chimney to the roof is serviceable and in good condition.
     

    19) The tree in the rear of the house is overhanging the rear roof to a minimal degree at this point but will grow expanding its coverage over time. Consideration to remove this tree at some point will prevent roof damage as well as correction of the concrete slab that poses a trip hazard due to its displacement by this tree.

    Photo 23  
    The tree has raised this section of rear walkway approximately 1" creating a trip hazard

    Photo 27  

    20)   On the rear roof of the extension in the corner where the roof terminates against the house there is a broken tile that needs to be appropriately caulked to prevent water intrusion inside of the home during driving rain and/or snow drifts. This can easily be corrected with a tube of roofing caulk.

    Photo 21  
     
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    21) The single garage electric receptacle has no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all garage receptacles have GFCI protection. For example, install a GFCI receptacle or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 28  
     

    22) The electrical outlet in the garage is cracked and should be replaced.
    23) The garage has been reduced in size to accommodate the basement expansion, as such there is a small area remaining for storage. The garage door was functional during this inspection manually.
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Partially traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Insulation depth: 3 1/2'
    Insulation estimated R value: 11
    24) A cover plate is missing from one electric box, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 45  
    The exposed junction box is located immediately after entering the attic entry door from the office location. It is a minor fix and should be covered to prevent shock.
     

    25) The insulation in the attic is in need of replenishment as there are sections that are torn and/or missing entirely which will hasten heat release into the cold attic. This is quite common in older homes; rolling additional insulation on top of the existing layer will enhance the R value of this home and save on heating.

    Photo 46  
    There are small sections in this attic that are absent of insulation from previous work that was done. Recommend adding insulation to those sections exposed to sheet rock below, at a minimum, to prevent rapid heat loss.
     

    26) No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation behind hatch for better energy efficiency.
    27) No weatherstrip is installed around the attic access hatch. Weatherstrip should be installed around the hatch to prevent heated interior air from entering attic.
    28) Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may have been caused by a past leak. Recommend asking the property owner about past leaks. The client should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 47  
     

    29)   There was light spider nesting in the attic, access via vents should be checked to verify that all screening is intact to prevent access.
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Underground
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: In the basement adjacent to the water main entry
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Copper
    System ground: Copper
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
    Branch circuit wiring type: Copper
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: Can't verify
    Smoke detectors present: NoIn the basement
    30) One current protection device (circuit breakers or fuses) is "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire. This is a safety hazard since the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks and fires may result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 34  
    There is a double tap on a 15 amp breaker on the right side of this panel section, see arrow. Additionally, the GFCI breaker on the left side would not trip when tested, see circle.
     

    31) One ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) breakers in the main service panel would not trip when tested. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace circuit breakers as necessary.
    32)   Behind the service panel there appears to be a frayed cable extending out of the back of this panel which should be inspected by a qualified electrician and corrected.

    Photo 30  
     
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 6 years
    Primary heating system energy source: Oil
    Primary heat system type: Hot water
    Distribution system: Metal pipe
    Manufacturer: Thermodynamics
    Model: S Series
    Last service date: None on burner depicting date, owner states its done annually by Slomins.
    33) Copper oil supply lines are exposed and subject to damage. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary so oil supply lines are not subject to damage.

    Photo 31  
     

    34)  

    Photo 35  
    Make and model clearly positioned on boiler

    Photo 36  
    Flame was checked during fire up and was found to be serviceable with a bright flame.
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): 65
    Location of main water shut-off valve: In rear of basement adjacent to the electrical panel
    Location of main fuel shut-off: Next to boiler
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Galvanized steel, Cast iron
    Drain pipe material: Plastic
    Waste pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
    35) Copper water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:

  • Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than six hours.
  • Install appropriate filters at points of use.
  • Use only cold water for cooking and drinking. Hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water.
  • Use bottled or distilled water.
  • Treat well water to make it less corrosive.
  • Have a qualified plumbing contractor replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components as necessary.

    For more information visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html
    http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html
    36) The main waste pipe clean out is accessible from the basement and is partially buried with earth. This should be cleaned for easy access when servicing is required and will prevent unwanted dirt from entering the sewage system when opened. Minor issue, cleaning required.
    37)   Supply to washer should be changed to braided hoses as the ones currently used are subject to failure more frequently.

    Photo 29  
     
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Metal prefabricated
    Woodstove type: Metal
    Chimney type: Metal
    38) The damper was missing the steel rod to control its movement and needs to be replaced prior to operating this unit. Improper damper operation with a lit fire will cause noxious gases to enter the house and is a severe safety concern. A qualified fireplace repair contractor should be called to evaluate the fix and correct it prior to use.
    39) The inspector was unable to determine if the wood stove and flue are installed safely, and in accordance with the manufacturers' specifications. The manufacturer's information label was missing. Recommend having a qualified stove and/or chimney service contractor evaluate to determine if the wood stove and flue are in installed in accordance with the manufacturers' specifications, and make repairs and/or modifications if necessary. The owner did state during this inspection that he recently had the fireplace checked and certified. Clarify from whom and verify the results.
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Concrete, Steel
    Beam material: Steel
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists, 2x6 tongue and groove
    40) One section of wiring that weren't terminated was found. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.

    Photo 32  
    Along the back wall behind the oil tank is an exposed electrical cable that is not terminated anywhere. This should be capped and secured in a junction box to avoid shock. Note: At the time of this inspection these wires were not hot.
     

    41) Basement entrance steps have more than two risers with no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 33  
     

    42)   A single double prong outlet was accessible in the large open area across from the washer. There is a mixture of double prong outlets throughout the house that need to be converted to grounded three prong outlets for proper appliance operation. A qualified electrician can determine the proper method to address these issues when desired.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    43) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    44) Some electric receptacles are damaged by paint preventing insertion of the electrical tester during this inspection. A qualified electrician should replace paint damaged receptacles as necessary and validate their polarities.
    45) Cover plate is missing from one electric outlet behind the microwave location. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    46) In the small bath off the den there is no outlet or fan. Additionally, the shower stem is not properly secured inside the wall and is easily moved when the water is turned on. Continued movement of water pipe can eventually cause a break. A qualified plumber should be brought in to secure this pipe properly. Access can be easily obtained from the wall side of the den to prevent tile damage during its repair.

    Photo 37  
     

    47) The cabinet door under the sink in the master bath has a broken push latch preventing the door from opening with a slight push. Replacement of this latch will correct its operation.
    48) Two handles are missing from water shut-off valves in the master bath. Handles should be replaced where missing.

    Photo 44  
     
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    49) Multiple open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles were found throughout the house. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

    Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and the presence of 2-pronged receptacles in some areas of this structure, an acceptable repair may be to simply replace the ungrounded 3-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools


    This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used. Recommend calling in a qualified electrician to go over the electric distribution service to outlets and determine the extent of work needed to correct all deficiencies.

    Photo 38  
    This outlet located next to the fireplace had an open ground the outlet next to it tested ok.

    Photo 39  
    This outlet has a hot neutral reverse.

    Photo 41  
    Kitchen counter outlet, non GFCI with an open ground.
     

    50) Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 10 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=old+smoke+alarms

    51) Glass in one of the sliding glass interior mirror doors is broken

    Photo 40  
     

    52) Evidence of a prior leak were found in the office area ceiling. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found. The stain may be due to past roof and/or plumbing leaks. Recommend asking the property owner about this, and monitoring the stained area in the future, especially after heavy or prolonged rain. If elevated moisture is found in the future, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 48  
     

    53) Minor cracks were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 42  
    Although difficult to see from this photo, caulking is needed on the crown molding for appearance purposes. This is a minor correction with some caulking.

    Photo 43  
    Although difficult to see from this photo, caulking is needed on the crown molding for appearance purposes. This is a minor correction with some caulking.

    Photo 50  
    Minor crack on master bedroom wall.

    Photo 49  
    Paper in the corner of the kids bedroom shows signs of previous shifting. This area is now dry and appears to be stable from further shifting.