View as PDF

View summary

Able Inspections

Website: http://ableinspections.net
Email: gjmulrain@hotmail.com
Inspector's email: gjmulrain@hotmail.com
Phone: (716) 432-7423
Inspector: Gary Mulrain

  

Building Analysis Report

Client(s):  Lou Oshier
Property address:  5326 Willow Lake Dr.
Clarence, New York
Inspection date:  Sunday, August 02, 2015

This report published on Sunday, August 02, 2015 9:57:18 PM EDT

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms


General information
Return to table of contents

Report number: LO822015
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 1962
Time started: 9:00am
Time finished: 11:30 am
Inspection Fee: $385.00
Present during inspection: Client(s)
Buildings inspected: One house, Attached garage
Number of residential units inspected: 1
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Warm
Front of structure faces: East
Main entrance faces: East
Foundation type: Unfinished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Security system, Irrigation system, Swimming pool, Hot tub, Private well, Shed, Playground equipment, Sauna, Low voltage outdoor lighting, Central vacuum system, Water filtration system, Water softener system, Built-in sound system, Intercom system, Generator system, Sport court, Sea wall

Exterior
Return to table of contents

Footing material: Poured in place concrete, Not visible
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Brick veneer, Vinyl
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete, Paving stones
Exterior door material: Solid core wood, Glass panel

1) The deck is unstable in one or more areas due to uneven bracing. This is a safety hazard since severe movement may cause the deck to collapse. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
Photo
Photo 1-1
 

2) Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed in one or more areas so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.
Photo
Photo 2-1
Photo
Photo 2-2
Photo
Photo 2-3
Photo
Photo 2-4
Photo
Photo 2-5
 

3) Cover plate(s) are broken at one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be replaced where necessary.

4) One or more outside faucets are missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/BODY_AE079
Photo
Photo 4-1
 

5) Pool light is unsafe and should be repaired by a qualified electrician. currently electric shock may occure
Photo
Photo 5-1
Photo
Photo 5-2

6) Electric switch on deck of pool is currently not moisture proof. face plate has been bent opening moisture seal
Photo
Photo 6-1
 

7) Conducive conditions Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.
Photo
Photo 7-1
Photo
Photo 7-2

8) One or more fence gates are difficult to open, close and/or latch, or are damaged and/or deteriorated. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary, so gates operate easily.
Photo
Photo 8-1
 

9) One or more areas of pool have chips missing these should be filled and sealed to keep water and moisture from entering behind pool wall
Photo
Photo 9-1
 

10) Conducive conditions Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
Photo
Photo 10-1
 

11) Pool has minor cracks in patio area of walk way Recommend sealing and monitoring
Photo
Photo 11-1
Photo
Photo 11-2
Photo
Photo 11-3
Photo
Photo 11-4
Photo
Photo 11-5
 

12) some cement veneer has chipped away from garage exterior wall. Recommend repairing to prevent moisture penetration
Photo
Photo 12-1
 

13) Dryer vent is not properly secured to exterior wall
Photo
Photo 13-1
 

14) Conducive conditions The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 14-1
Photo
Photo 14-2
Photo
Photo 14-3
 

15) Minor cracks were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
Photo
Photo 15-1
Photo
Photo 15-2
Photo
Photo 15-3
Photo
Photo 15-4

Roof
Return to table of contents

Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars
Roof type: Gable
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Estimated age of roof: 8 to 10 years old
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum, Steel
Roof ventilation: Adequate

16) Conducive conditions Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.
Photo
Photo 16-1
 

Garage
Return to table of contents


17) Non-metallic sheathed wiring is routed in one or more areas so it is subject to damage, such as on wall or ceiling surfaces. The insulation can be damaged by objects coming in contact with it and/or it being repeatedly moved. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, rewire using conduit, or re-routing through wall cavities.
Photo
Photo 17-1
 

Attic
Return to table of contents

Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
Insulation depth: 6.5 inches
Insulation estimated R value: R19

18) Attic appears to be dry and rodent free
Photo
Photo 18-1
Photo
Photo 18-2
Photo
Photo 18-3
 

Electric service
Return to table of contents

Primary service type: Overhead
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 100
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: Electric meter is located outside
Location of sub panels: None found
Location of main disconnect: No single main disconnect, use all breakers in main service panel
Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil, Cold water supply pipes
Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
Smoke detectors present: Yes

19) The service entrance wire insulation is frayed and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs or replace wires as necessary.
Photo
Photo 19-1
Photo
Photo 19-2

20) The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in the main service panel is missing, unreadable or incomplete. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

Water heater
Return to table of contents

Estimated age: 2006
Type: Tank
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Manufacturer: Reliance
Model: 640YORS

21) Water heater was checked for CO2 and none was found
Photo
Photo 21-1
 

Heating and cooling
Return to table of contents

Estimated age: 2012
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Baseboard, Hot water
Primary A/C energy source: N/A
Primary Air conditioning type: N/A
Distribution system: Metal pipe
Manufacturer: Dunkirk
Model: PWXL4VNT2
Last service date: None found

22) Boiler was checked for CO2 and none was found
Photo
Photo 22-1
 

Plumbing and laundry
Return to table of contents

Water pressure (psi): 60 lbs
Location of main water shut-off valve: Basement
Location of main water meter: Basement
Location of main fuel shut-off: Front of house
Visible fuel storage systems: None fpund
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Galvanized steel
Supply pipe material: Copper
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron

23) Water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:
  • Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than six hours.
  • Install appropriate filters at points of use.
  • Use only cold water for cooking and drinking. Hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water.
  • Use bottled or distilled water.
  • Treat well water to make it less corrosive.
  • Have a qualified plumbing contractor replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components as necessary.

For more information visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html and http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html

24) Laundry room has a non Ground Fault Circuit Internet being used less than 6 feet from water source
Photo
Photo 24-1
 

Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Return to table of contents

Fireplace type: Masonry
Chimney type: Masonry

25) A significant amount of creosote (1/8 inch or more) is visible in the fireplace flue. A qualified chimney service contractor should inspect, clean, and repair if necessary now and annually in the future.

26) All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.

Basement
Return to table of contents

Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
Pier or support post material: Steel
Beam material: Steel
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists

27) No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection device is visible for the sump pump electric supply. A qualified electrician should determine if a GFCI protection device (receptacle or circuit breaker) exists for the sump pump and install one if missing to reduce the danger of electric shock.
Photo
Photo 27-1
 

28) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
Photo
Photo 28-1
 

29) Non grounded outlets
Photo
Photo 29-1
Photo
Photo 29-2

30) Conducive conditions Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. For example, water stains and/or efflorescence on the foundation or floor, water stains at bases of support posts, etc. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.
Photo
Photo 30-1
Photo
Photo 30-2
Photo
Photo 30-3
Photo
Photo 30-4
Photo
Photo 30-5
Photo
Photo 30-6

31) Conducive conditions Standing water and/or wet areas were found in one or more sections of the basement. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. A qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:
  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.
Photo
Photo 31-1
Photo
Photo 31-2

32) No sump tank or pit liner lid is visible for the sump pump. Standard building practices call for a sump tank to be installed, made from polyethylene, clay, tile, steel, concrete or fiberglass. Sump tanks are normally 18 inches in diameter and vary from two to three feet deep. Sediment may accumulate and shorten the life of the pump if the sump pump is installed in an unlined pit. A qualified contractor should install a sump tank as per standard building practices. For more information on sump pump installations, visit http://www.hometips.com/cs-protected/guides/sumps.html
Photo
Photo 32-1
 

Kitchen
Return to table of contents


33) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
Photo
Photo 33-1
Photo
Photo 33-2

34) The sink sprayer at the kitchen sink is inoperable or defective. It should be replaced, by a qualified plumber if necessary. Sprayer has major leak when faucet is turned on
Photo
Photo 34-1
Photo
Photo 34-2

35) Water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below one or more sinks. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
Photo
Photo 35-1
Photo
Photo 35-2

36) Minor damage and/or deterioration was found at countertops in one or more areas. The client(s) should evaluate and consider having repairs made, and/or countertops replaced where necessary.
Photo
Photo 36-1
 

37) One or more kitchen appliances appear to be near, at, or beyond their intended service life of 10 to 15 years. Recommend budgeting for replacements as necessary.

38) Range top GE
Oven Frigid aire
Dishwasher Whirlpool
Ref GE
Checked appliances for manufacturer recalls and none were found

Bathrooms
Return to table of contents


39) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
Photo
Photo 39-1
Photo
Photo 39-2

40) Non grounded outlet
Photo
Photo 40-1
 

41) Toilet is not installed straight upper bath
Lower toilet is loose.
Photo
Photo 41-1
 

42) Conducive conditions One or more sink drains have an active leak. For example, at pipe fittings and/or junctions between pipe and sink. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.
Photo
Photo 42-1
 

43) One or more exhaust fans are noisy or vibrate excessively. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace the fan(s) or make repairs as necessary.

44) One or more sink drains have substandard repairs, such as tape, sealant and/or non-standard components. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Interior rooms
Return to table of contents


45) Two-pronged electric receptacles rather than three-pronged, grounded receptacles are installed in one or more interior rooms. They are considered to be unsafe by today's standards and limit the ability to use appliances that require a ground in these rooms. Examples of appliances that require grounded receptacles include:
  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

This list is not exhaustive. A qualified electrian should evaluate and install grounded receptacles as per the client(s)' needs and standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 45-1
Photo
Photo 45-2
Photo
Photo 45-3
Photo
Photo 45-4
Photo
Photo 45-5
Photo
Photo 45-6

46) Based on the age of this structure and the appearance of existing smoke alarms, the alarms may be older than 10 years old. According to National Fire Protection Association, aging smoke alarms don't operate as efficiently and often are the source for nuisance alarms. Older smoke alarms are estimated to have a 30% probability of failure within the first 10 years. Newer smoke alarms do better, but should be replaced after 10 years. Unless you know that the smoke alarms are new, replacing them when moving into a new residence is also recommended by NFPA. For more information, visit this article: NFPA urges replacing home smoke alarms after 10 years.

47) Lamp holders or light fixtures with fully or partially exposed bulbs are installed in one or more closets. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Flammable stored items may come into contact with hot bulbs, and hot fragments from broken bulbs may fall on combustible materials. Standard building practices require closet lighting to use fluorescent light fixtures, or to use fully enclosed incandescent fixtures. Installing a compact fluorescent lamp in a lamp holder is not an acceptable practice. A qualified electrician should replace closet lights as necessary and as per standard building practices.
Photo
Photo 47-1
Photo
Photo 47-2
Photo
Photo 47-3
Photo
Photo 47-4
Photo
Photo 47-5
Photo
Photo 47-6
Photo
Photo 47-7
 

48) Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

49) Minor cracks were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
Photo
Photo 49-1
 


Home Inspectors are not required to report on the following: Life expectancy of any component or system: The causes for the need for repair: The methods,materials and costs of corrections: The suitability of the property for any specialized use: Compliance or non-compliance with codes, ordinances, statutes, regulatory requirements or restrictions: The market value of the property or it's marketability: The advisability or inadvisability of purchase of the property. Any component or system that was not observed: The presence or absence of pests such as wood damaging organisms, rodents or cosmetic items, underground items or items not permanently installed.
Home inspectors are not required to: offer warranties of any kind: Calculate the strength,adequacy or efficiently of any system or component: Enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or it's components or be dangerous to the inspector or others in the area:Operate any system that is shut down or otherwise inoperable: Operate any system or component that does not respond to normal operating controls: Distribute insulation, move personal items, panels, furniture,equipment,plant life,soil, snow, ice or debris that obstructs access or visibility: Determine the presence or absence of any suspected adverse environmental conditions or hazardous substance, including but not limited to mold, toxins, carcinogens,noise contaminants in the building or in the soil,water or air; determine the effectiveness of any system installed to control or remove suspected hazardous substances; Predict future conditions, including but not limited to failure of components; since this report is provided for the specific benefit of the customer(s), secondary readers of this information should hire a certified inspector to perform an inspection to meet their specific needs and to obtain current information concerning this property