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Website: http://www.a-teamhomeinspections.com
Email: office@a-teamhomeinspections.com
Inspector's email: dan@a-teamhomeinspections.com
Phone: (630) 851-2076
Inspector: A. Dan Leleika
IL Home Inspector License #450.002122
Exp. 11/30/2016
Mold Certification #IAC2-01-4888 @ www.iac2.org
International Association of Certified Indoor Air Consultants

  

Home Inspection Report

Client(s):  Mrs. Home Buyer
Property address:  5713 W. Main Street
Yourtown, IL 00000
Inspection date:  Thursday, December 04, 2014

This report published on Monday, January 26, 2015 12:34:55 PM CST

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Basement
Kitchen
First Floor Bathroom
Second Floor Bathroom
Interior rooms


General information
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Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 90+ Years
Time started: 3:30pm
Time finished: 6:00pm
Inspection Fee: $369.00
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Cloudy
Temperature: Cold
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: North
Main entrance faces: North
Foundation type: Unfinished basement
1) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygenists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
Exterior
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Footing material: Not visible
Apparent wall structure: Brick
Wall covering: Brick veneer
Driveway material: N/A
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core fiberglass
2) One or more flights of stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.
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3) One or more outside faucets are missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit: https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&biw=1436&bih=707&sclient=psy-ab&q=anti-siphon+hose+bib&oq=anti-siphon+hose+bib&gs_l=serp.12...0.0.0.7943.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0..0.0.msedr...0...1c..58.psy-ab..0.0.0.Quqk1fk4DoI&pbx=1&cad=cbv&sei=TJGEVMz1NNWhyATxg4DABQ
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4) Perimeter pavement slopes towards structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Recommend having a qualified contractor make repairs as necessary so perimeter pavement slopes down and away from the structure.
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5) Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.
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6) Minor cracks were found in one or more sections of brick veneer. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as repointing mortar to prevent water intrusion and further deterioration in the future.

More information on repointing mortar can be found by visiting:http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/how-to/intro/0,,20268891,00.html
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7) One or more electric receptacles at the front exterior appear to have no power. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
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8) The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas at the front of the house. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.
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9) Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.
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10) Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit The Ins and Outs of Caulking.
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11) Minor cracks were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
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Roof
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Roof inspection method: Viewed from eaves on ladder
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
Roof type: Gable
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Unable to determine (no access to attic spaces),  Dormer attics did not have any venting.
12) One or more sections of flashing at the base of the chimney and at the flashing of the vent pipe are deteriorated and/or substandard. Leaks may occur as a result.

Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in the attic around the chimney. For example, efflorescence on the the brick in attic area directly below roof are mentioned above. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms and should not be present. Recommend reviewing any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner about past water intrusion.

A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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Garage
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Type: Detached, 2-car
Automatic Opener: Yes
Safety Reverses: Operable:
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
13) Gutters and/or downspouts are not installed on detached garage roof. Rainwater can come in contact with the building exterior or accumulate around the building foundation as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified person repair as necessary.
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14) Some shingles on detached garage roof were cracked / broken / loose and/or damaged. Leaks can occur as a result. This is a conducive condition for wood-destroying organisms. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary. For example, by replacing shingles.
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15) The interior perimeter of the garage is excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.
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Attic
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Inspection method: Traversed
Roof structure type: Rafters
Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
16) Ceiling insulation is missing in some areas. Recommend installing insulation where missing for better energy efficiency.
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Electric service
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Primary service type: Overhead
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 100
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil, Cold water supply pipes
Main disconnect rating (amps): 100
Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: Can't verify
Smoke detectors present: Yes
17) One or more screws are missing from the main service panel cover and should be replaced. Because energized wiring may exist behind the holes with the missing screws, recommend that a qualified, licensed electrician replace these screws, or that care be taken to ensure that the new screws do not come in contact with wiring inside the panel when they are installed. Stock screws from the panel manufacturer should be used, or their equivalent.
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Water heater
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Estimated age: 2+ Years
Type: Tank
Energy source: Natural gas
Capacity (in gallons): 40
Manufacturer: General Electric
Model#: GG40S06AVJ00
Serial #: GELNQ301217348
Pressure Relief Valve: Yes
Extension Proper: Yes
Vent Pipe: Satisfactory
Heating and cooling
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Estimated age: 2+ Years
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
Distribution system: Flexible ducts
Manufacturer: Ameristar
Furnace Model #: M801P120DU60AAB
Furnace Serial #: 14311PEL1G
A/C Model#: M4AC3048B1000AA
A/C Serial #: 140920385M
Filter location: At the base of the furnace
18) No exterior disconnect switch was found for the outside condensing unit. These are normally installed to prevent the condensing unit from responding to the thermostat off-season, or during maintenance. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and install one as necessary.
19) One or more holes, gaps or openings were found in the chimney inside the building. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of exhaust gases entering living spaces. Recommend that a qualified person make permanent repairs as necessary. For example, by filling holes with masonry products such as mortar, concrete and/or bricks.
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20) Insulation for the outside condensing unit's refrigerant lines is damaged, deteriorated and/or missing in one or more areas. This may result in reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should replace insulation as necessary.
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21) Permanent structures are too close to the outdoor condensing unit. Standard building practices require that there be at least 12 inches of clearance on all sides and at least four to six feet above. Inadequate clearances around the condensing unit can result in reduced efficiency, increased energy costs and/or damage to equipment. Modifications should be made to structures around and/or above the condensing unit by a qualified contractor as necessary to maintain these clearances.
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22) One or more heating or cooling ducts in an unconditioned space (e.g. crawl space, attic or basement) had insulation that was damaged or deteriorated. This can result in reduced energy efficiency, moisture inside heating ducts, and/or "sweating" on cooling ducts. Recommend that a qualified person repair per standard building practices. For example, by wrapping ducts in insulation with an R-value of R-8.

The insulation had gaps that heating air was escaping into the unconditioned attic space.
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23) The outdoor air temperature was below 60 degrees Fahrenheit during the inspection. Because of this, the inspector was unable to operate and fully evaluate the cooling system.
Plumbing and laundry
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Location of main water shut-off valve: At meter
Location of main water meter: Basement
Location of main fuel shut-off: Exterior at meter
Water service: Public
Service pipe material: Lead
Vent pipe material: Plastic
Drain pipe material: Plastic
Waste pipe material: Cast iron
Sump Pump Installed?:: None Installed
24) The water service pipe appears to be made of lead, which is a known health hazard, especially to children. Lead service pipes should be replaced to eliminate this hazard. A qualified plumber should evaluate and replace the service pipe and fittings as necessary to eliminate the lead hazard.
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25) The water supply pressure is below 40 psi, and the flow appears to be inadequate. 40-80 psi is considered to be the normal range for water pressure in a home. The inspector performed a "functional flow test" during the inspection, where multiple fixtures are run simultaneously, and found there to be low flow. For example, the shower flow decreased significantly when the toilet was flushed. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair or make modifications as necessary. Installing a pressure boosting system is one possible solution. For information on these systems, visit: http://www.low-water-pressure.com/
26) Gas dryer appears not to work
Basement
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Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
Pier or support post material: Steel
Beam material: Solid wood, Steel
Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
27) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
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28) One or more flights of stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.
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29) Insulation at one or more crawlspace walls has fallen down / was missing. Heating and cooling costs will likely be higher due to reduced energy efficiency. Recommend that a qualified person repair, replace or install insulation as necessary and per standard building practices.
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30) Sealant or water-proofing coating was found on basement walls and/or floors. This may indicate that water has infiltrated or accumulated in the basement previously. Monitor the basement for excessive moisture conditions in the future, and review any disclosure statements related to accumulated moisture in the basement. Note that the inspector does not guarantee or warrant that water will not accumulate in the basement in the future.
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Kitchen
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Walls & Ceiling Condition: Satisfactory
Floor Condition: Satisfactory
Countertops Condition: Satisfactory
Cabinets Condition: Satisfactory
Heating / Cooling Source: Yes
Plumbing Functional Flow: Adequate
Plumbing Functional Drainage: Adequate
Electrical Outlets Present: Yes
Operable: Yes
G.F.C.I.: Yes
Operable: No
Food Disposal: None
Dishwaser: Operates
Oven: Operates
Stove Top Range: Operates
Exhaust Fan: Operates
Microwave: Operates
Refrigerator: Operates
31) One or more open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices. Replacement of three-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles is not an acceptable solution.
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32) One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric receptacles did not trip when tested. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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33) The range can tip forward, and no anti-tip bracket appears to be installed. This is a safety hazard since the range may tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it, or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free standing ranges since 1985. An anti-tip bracket should be installed to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit http://www.diynetwork.com/videos/simple-anti-tip-stove-device/4588.html
34) Water damage was found in shelving or cabinet components below one or more sinks in the kitchen. Recommend that a qualified contractor repair as necessary after any plumbing leaks have been repaired. If moisture is present then concealed areas should be dried thoroughly.
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First Floor Bathroom
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Walls & Ceiling Condition: Satisfactory
Floor Condition: Satisfactory
Countertops Condition: Satisfactory
Cabinets Condition: Satisfactory
Heating / Cooling Source: Yes
Plumbing Functional Flow: Low Flow
Plumbing Functional Drainage: Substandard
Electrical Outlets Present: Yes
Operable: Yes
G.F.C.I.: Yes
Exhaust Fan: Yes
Operates: Yes
35) Tile, stone and/or grout flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more "wet" areas with a wood subfloor below. The deterioration may allow water intrusion, and may result in damage to the subfloor. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing broken tiles and deteriorated grout, and resealing grout.
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36) The water supply flow for the bathtub was low. Recommend that a qualified plumber evaluate and repair as necessary.
37) One or more sinks are clogged or drain slowly. This may be caused by the drain size under the sink is 1 1/4" pipe. 1 1/2" drain pipe might be necessary in the future to prevent frequent clogging. Drain(s) should be cleared as necessary, and by a qualified plumber if necessary.
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38)   Shower head leaks when on
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Second Floor Bathroom
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Walls & Ceiling Condition: Satisfactory
Floor Condition: Satisfactory
Countertops Condition: Satisfactory
Cabinets Condition: Satisfactory
Heating / Cooling Source: Yes
Plumbing Functional Flow: Low Flow
Plumbing Functional Drainage: Adequate
Electrical Outlets Present: Yes
Operable: Yes
G.F.C.I.: Yes
Exhaust Fan: Yes
Operates: Yes
39) The equipment for the jetted bathtub was inaccessible (e.g. no access hatch, permanently installed hatch, unusual fasteners for hatch). As a result, the inspector was unable to evaluate the jetted bathtub's electrical and mechanical equipment.


The inspector was unable to determine if ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection is installed for the jetted tub's electric supply due to lack of access to the equipment below the tub. If no GFCI protection is installed, then this is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified contractor and/or electrician should evaluate and install GFCI protection if none exists. If necessary, modifications should be made to allow access to the GFCI device for periodic evaluation and to reset it when it trips.
40) The jetting system for the bathtub was inoperable. Recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
41) The water supply flow for the bathtub was low. Recommend that a qualified plumber evaluate and repair as necessary.
Interior rooms
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Walls & Ceiling Condition: Satisfactory
Floor Condition: Satisfactory
Heating / Cooling Source: Yes
Representative number of windows were operated and found to be: Satisfactory
A representative number of installed lighting fixtures, switches and receptacles located inside the house, garage and exterior walls were tested and found to be: Satisfactory
42) One or more handrails are not continuous for the entire length of the flight of stairs. This is a safety hazard. Handrails should be continuous, and extend the full length of flights of stairs. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
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43) Wire splices were exposed and were not contained in a covered junction box for light fixture in the faux fireplace. This is a potential shock or fire hazard. Recommend that a qualified electrician repair per standard building practices. For example, by installing permanently mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
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44) Seals between double-pane glass in one or more windows in back porch area appear to have failed based on condensation or stains between the panes of glass. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace glass where necessary.

The client(s) should be aware that evidence of broken seals may be more or less visible from one day to the next depending on the temperature, humidity, sunlight, etc. Windows or glass doors other than those that the inspector identified may also have failed seals and need glass replaced too.
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45) Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.
INSPECTOR MAKES NO WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, AS TO THE FITNESS FOR USE, CONDITION, PERFORMANCE OR ADEQUACY OF ANY INSPECTED STRUCTURE, ITEM, COMPONENT, OR SYSTEM.