A-DILIGENT INSPECTION

Website: http://www.reporthost.com/a-diligent
Email: diligentinspect@bellsouth.net
Phone: (770) 427-9291
FAX: (775) 361-9091
2774 N. Cobb Pkwy. 
Ste. 109 #195 
Kennesaw, GA 30152
Inspector: Ernie Johnson

   

A-DILIGENT HOME INSPECTION
SAMPLE REPORT
Client(s): Mr. & Mrs. Sample
Property address: 2207 Wisteria Lane
Yourtown, GA 30112
Inspection date: Friday, November 18, 2005
This report published on 8/22/2007 3:16:21 PM EDT

View summary page

ReportHost reports, meet or exceed the Standard of Practice of
ASHI, NACHI & NAHI


This report is the exclusive property of A-Diligent Inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

This report includes both a DETAIL SECTION and a SUMMARY SECTION. You may select to view and or print in either mode or both. Many areas of this diligent inspection report will contain hyperlinks which will direct you to expert informative details on a subject of concern.

Please understand that all homes, regardless of their age, have some number of defects or issues to address or monitor. Home inspection reports by nature focus on defects and thus may seem negative in tone. Many or even most features of this property may be in excellent condition and of high quality and may have been deemed "adequate or acceptable" for purposes of this report. Therefore, many of the 545 plus items from the inspectors field notes list that were inspected/viewed or considered and were deemed adequate or acceptable, may not be specifically commented on in the written report. This is not meant to downplay this property's assets, but rather to focus attention on alerting you to the potentially important issues. These are those specific areas that need attention, evaluation, maintenance, or those items which may create safety concerns or possible major or costly repair and replacement expense.

This report will also contain items to alert or advise you of common things which a homeowner may want or need to know. These may include information on specific location of meters, shut-off switches, turn-off valves and other data which will help the owner better understand the items, systems or mechanics of the home.

This inspection complies with the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors' (NACHI) "Standards of Practice" and " Codes of Ethics"and in most cases meets or exceeds most other American and National standards of practice. These standards list items to be described in this report and items to be observed or evaluated during A-Diligent Inspection. Cosmetic items such as nicked or damaged molding, trim, interior paint or carpet issues are generally not a major concern of this report and may be excluded from this report.

Our report contains valuable information that is for your analysis now, as well as, specific maintenance details and reference information that will prove important to you for years to come.

Thank you for choosing, [u]A-Diligent Inspection.
You will benefit from the diligent approach taken in inspecting your property. This should assist you in getting the maximum return from your investment with the least amount of worry.



 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyCan pose a potential hazard, with a risk of injury or even death 
Major defectCorrection may likely involve a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor defectCorrection likely involves only minor or no expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation, perhaps by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
Comment"FYI" - For your information 

Structural Pest Inspection Concerns
Items of concern relating to the structural pest inspection are shown as follows:
WDO/WDI InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
WDO/WDI DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
WDO/WDI Conducive
conditions
Conditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Attic
Garage
Electric service
Water heater
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, wood-stoves and chimneys
Heating and cooling
Kitchen
Bathrooms Guest
Bathroom 1/2 on first level
Bathrooms Master
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 618
Structures inspected: 2207 Wisteria Lane, Your town, GA 30112
Type of building: Single family
Style/Stories: 2
Age of building (est.): 12
Client's name: Mr. & Mrs. Sample
Client Type: Seller
Time started: 1:00 pm
Time finished: 3:50 pm
Inspection Fee: $ 239.00
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Client(s), Property owner(s), (Realtor)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Mid 60's
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: South
Main entrance faces: South
Foundation type: Slab on grade
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Security system, Irrigation system, Playground equipment, Low voltage outdoor lighting, Water filtration system, Built-in sound system.
Water: Public
Sewage: Public


1)   This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
2)   Some wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by furniture and/or stored items. Some areas couldn't be evaluated.
3)   Water system has a main turn off at street (special rod/wrench in garage) and turn off in water heater/furnace room near the floor on the left. The water meter is at the street connection below ground.
4)   Gas meter and shut off on left outside of house, behind the chimney chase..

Photo 15  
Location: Gas meter and shut off, left side rear, next to chimney.

Photo 19  
Main gas emergency shutoff.

5)   Electric Meter and main disconnect breakers are located on outside left wall of house in front of the chimney chase.

Photo 5  
Location: Electric Meter & Main breaker switch left side front Corner.

Photo 39  
Main Electric Emergency Breaker Switch
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Siding: Wood composite clapboard
Door exterior: French door to master bedroom has a rot issue at bottom of access door.
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Foundation: Concrete slab
Sidewalk & Patio material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior front door material: Solid core wood
Footing material: Concrete
6)   One or more electric receptacles have reverse-polarity wiring, where the hot and neutral wires are reversed. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. These units are on the outside of the dining room doors, on the wall to the right and outside the back door to the wall to the right.

Both outdoor receptacles at the back outside wall need GFCI protection devices installed.

7)   One or more hornet, bee and/or wasp nests were found. These can pose a safety hazard. Nest(s) should be removed as necessary.

Photo 29  
In ground, yellow jacket wasp nest.
 

8)   One or more wall-mounted exterior light fixtures have wiring that's subject to water intrusion due to caulk not being installed around the light fixture's back plate. Caulk should be applied around the perimeter of back plates where missing. A gap should be left at the bottom for condensation to drain out.

Photo 43  
 

9)   Front door weather stripping is damaged

Photo 27  
Damaged front door weather seal at door handle level. Approx. 12" in length.

Photo 51  
Damaged front door weather seal

10) Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified person or tradesman should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion. Based on visible activity in the area, carpenter ants are suspected. Damage is apparent on the bottom course only. Should be evaluated.

Photo 3  
Siding board bottom center rot, insects, Right side, exterior of garage.

Photo 4  
Siding insect damage on bottom siding board. Right side, exterior of garage.

Photo 10  
Additional garage siding board damage, bottom center.
 

11) 2nd story window, above entry needs to have sill replaced and painted as does the window frame at family room . A qualified tradesman or contractor should be contacted to repair before further damage to window components.

Photo 8  
Sill moisture damage, dry rot, front 2nd level window, above entrance.

Photo 37  
Family room front window.

Photo 38  
Window trim, wood rot.
 

12)   One large tree is very close the house's foundation. Tree roots can cause significant structural damage to foundations. Recommend having a qualified person, tree service contractor or arborist remove trees as necessary to prevent damage to the structures foundation.

Photo 6  
Tree too close to House. Left side,rear. Overhang limbs have been trimmed.
 

13) One of the two wooden deck support posts are in contact with soil. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. However no damage from wood destroying insects or organisms was found.
Standard building practices require that there be at least 6" of space between any wood and the soil below, even if the wood is treated. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. Otherwise recommend installing borate based Impel rods to prevent rot.

Photo 11  
Footing of rear deck, left side of house in contact with soil. No deterioration noted.

Photo 41  
Wood in direct contact with soil.

14)   Rear kitchen entry door frame has repair that is failing at the bottom of the door frame casing, near the sill. Needs repair and painting by a qualified person, tradesman or contractor.

Photo 14  
Trim damage at bottom right of rear entry door.
 

15) Two Sofit vent screens are blocked by paint, insulation or debris. This can reduce air flow through the attic, reduce the life of the roof surface because of high temperatures, and/or increase the moisture content in the attic. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as cleaning paint from screens, replacing screens, and/or moving insulation so vents are unobstructed. Sofit at front of garage.

Photo 9  
Soffit vents garage front, partially blocked by several coats of paint.
 

16)   The front outside hose bibb, to the left of the garage, appeared to be inoperable. No water came out of the faucet(s) when turned on. This may be due to a (winterizing) shut-off valve being turned off. As per the NACHI and ASHI Standards of Practice, the inspector did not attempt to turn on or off any water supply shut-off valves. Recommend that the client(s) ask the seller about outside faucets with no water, and/or have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair faucet(s) as necessary.

Photo 52  
 

17) Soil is in contact with or less than six inches from siding and/or trim. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Soil should be graded and/or removed as necessary so there are at least six inches of space between the siding and trim and the soil below.

Photo 2  
Soil within 6" of siding, garage rear left, level with no pitch to carry water away.
 

18) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

Photo 7  
Shrubs too close to house, at right of front entrance and on left.

Photo 48  
Bushes to close to house.

19) One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.

Photo 20  
Downspout has no extensions.
 

20)   Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

Photo 17  
Typical cracks in concrete driveway
 

21) The perimeter grading slopes toward the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.
22)   Mildew, Moss & Stains have many causes. Mildew and Moss are live fungi that lives on/in paint, mostly under shady areas. They can be destroyed with bleach cleaning. Some stains can be cleaned off of surfaces, such as sap, resin, soot, grease and insect eggs. Other such as rust may require painting but the source should be addressed to prevent recurrences.
23) Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.
24) Recommend cleaning deck(s) and railing(s) and treating with a preservative claiming to waterproof, block ultraviolet light, and stop mildew. Consumer Reports recommends these products:

  • Cabot Decking Stain and PTW Stain
  • Olympic Water Repellent Deck Stain
  • Thompson's House and Deck Stain
  • Wolman PTW Deck Stain
  • Akzo Sikkens Cetol DEK
  • Benjamin Moore Moorwood Clear Wood Finish
  • DAP Woodlife Premium
  • Olympic Natural Look Protector Plus

    Photo 13  
    Rear view of house with wood deck off of the master bedroom.

    Photo 28  
    Stain or seal railing and balasters.

    25) Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit The Ins and Outs of Caulking.
    26) The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or re-stain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.
    27)   Minor cracks were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 49  
    Minor cracks.

    Photo 50  
    Minor cracks.
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars; Telephoto images; Viewed from ladder and windows
    Roof type: Cross gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 12 years
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Very good
    28) Counter-flashing is missing at the base of one or more chimneys. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing or chimney service contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    29) One or more "rubber boot" flashings are damaged or deteriorated and may result in leaks or vermin intrusion. A qualified contractor should replace flashings where necessary.

    Photo 44  
    Tear in rubber boot.
     

    30) One or more roof surface sections slope down toward exterior walls. Debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate in this area than rest of the roof. Leaks may occur as a result. Recommend monitoring such areas for accumulated debris in the future and cleaning as necessary.
    31) Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.

    Photo 12  
    Rear gutters, with screen guard, partially blocked by pine needles and leaves.

    Photo 18  
    Accumulation of leaves and pine needles where two roof surfaces meet and gutter meets.

    32) Debris such as leaves, needles, seeds, etc. have accumulated on the roof. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since water may not flow easily off the roof, and may enter gaps in the roof surface. Leaks may occur as a result. Debris should be cleaned from the roof now and as necessary in the future.
    33) Trees are overhanging roof and are within 10 feet of roof vertically. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since organic debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate on the roof surface. Accumulated debris may cause water to enter gaps in the roof surface and leak into attic and/or interior spaces. Trees should be pruned so they are at least 10 feet above roof, or don't overhang the roof.

    Photo 6  
    Tree too close to House. Left side,rear. Overhang limbs have been trimmed.
     

    34) Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.
    35)     Several inspection close up views of the roof surface show the roof in overall excellent condition.

    Photo 30  

    Photo 31  

    Photo 32  

    Photo 33  

    Photo 34  

    Photo 45  

    Photo 46  
     
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed attic area
    Roof structure: Plywood sheathing on wood rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Blown in fiberglass and fiberglass roll or batt
    Insulation depth: 14 to 15 inches
    Insulation estimated "R" value: R-38
    Attic access: Pull down stairs
    Attic ventilation: Adequate
    36)   Some wiring is loose, unsupported, or inadequately supported. Standard building practices require non-metallic sheathed wiring to be trimmed to length, attached to runners or to solid backing with fasteners at intervals of 4-1/2 ft. or less. Fasteners should be installed within 12 inches of all enclosures. A qualified, licensed electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, trim wire to length and/or install staples as needed.

    Photo 16  
    Wiring, unsupported, or inadequately supported
     

    37)   The attic exhaust fan was inoperable during the inspection. Recommend consulting with the property owner(s) as to how it operates and/or having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair if necessary.
     
    Garage Return to table of contents
    Type: 2 car attached
    Remote control doors: Yes, two
    Attic area above access: Yes, hatch
    38)   Safety containment cables are missing for one or more vehicle door springs. This is a safety hazard. Safety containment cables prevent springs from snapping free and causing damage or injury. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs or replace components as necessary. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html or http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html

    Photo 58  
     

    39)   Extension cords are being used as permanent wiring in one or more areas. They should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring poses a fire and shock hazard, and is an indication that wiring is inadequate and should be updated. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure, resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, and sparks that could start a fire. Extension cords should be removed as necessary, or a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install additional circuits and/or electric receptacles.

    Photo 54  
     

    40)   Evidence of "light to moderate" rodent infestation was found in one or more areas. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines this as less than 20 feces per square foot. Rodent infestation may be a safety hazard due to the risk of contracting Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). HPS is a rare (only 20-50 cases per year in the United states) but deadly (40% mortality rate) disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. For example, from sweeping up rodent droppings.

    Recommend following guidelines in the CDC's Clean Up, Trap Up, Seal Up article for eradicating rodents, cleaning up their waste and nesting materials, and preventing future infestations. While Hanta virus is believed to survive less than one week in droppings and urine, specific precautions should be taken during clean up. The client(s) may wish to consult with a qualified, licensed pest control operator for eliminating the infestation. A qualified licensed abatement contractor or industrial hygienist could be contacted for clean up. If the infestation was minimal, clean up of rodent waste and nesting materials in non-living spaces (crawl spaces and attics) may not be necessary, or may be performed for aesthetic reasons only (odor and appearance).

    41)   The garage-house door isn't equipped with an automatic closing device such as sprung hinges. This door should close and latch automatically to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces and/or to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should install automatic closing device(s) as necessary, and as per standard building practices, so this door closes and latches automatically.
    42)   The control button or panel for operating the vehicle door opener is loose. Buttons or control panels should be securely attached to wall surfaces.
    43)   Much of the garage, include areas around the interior perimeter and in the center are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.

    Photo 26  
    Stored items in garge along walls and in center area.
     
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Underground
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 150
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240, 3 phase, 4 wire, 120/208
    Location of main service switch: Outside box next to meter
    Location of main disconnect: In box at meter, top pull down breaker switch
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 150
    Branch circuit wiring type: Non-metallic sheathed, Copper
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    44)   Inadequate working space exists for the main service panel. Standard building practices require the following clearances:

  • An area 30 inches wide by 3 feet deep exists in front of the panel
  • The panel is at least 5 1/2 feet above the floor
  • There is at least 6 feet 6 inches of headroom in front of the panel
  • The wall below the panel is clear to the floor

    All items stored in front of the panel need to be removed by owner.
    45)   The legend for over-current protection devices (breakers or fuses) in the main service panel is missing, unreadable or incomplete. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary however unlikely as matter is very basic.

    Photo 55  
     
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 1 year or less
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): 50
    Manufacturer: A.O. Smith
    Model #: GCU50-100
    Serial #: MO6A059765
    46)   This is a new, recently installed water heater. No drain line is installed for the temperature-pressure relief valve. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified person, tradesman or plumber should install a drain line as per standard building practices. For example, extending to 6 inches from the floor, or routed so as to drain outside. For more information, visit http://www.wattsreg.com/default.htm?/t&p/installation.htm

    Photo 56  
     
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): Satisfactory
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Left of water heater near floor
    Location of main water meter: Sub-level at street on lot line left
    Location of main fuel shut-off: At gas meter outside of the house, left side.
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Not visible
    Supply pipe material: Polyethylene installed as a replacement in the last 2-3 yrs. replacing original Polybutylene pipes.
    Vent pipe material: PVC
    Drain pipe material: Not visible
    Waste pipe material: Plastic
    47)   The clothes dryer is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified person or tradesman, if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information on dryer safety issues, see http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html
    48)   Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection as both were fully loaded when home was inspected.
     
    Fireplaces, wood-stoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Masonry with metal liner
    Chimney type: Metal
    49)   The gas supply for one or more gas fireplaces and/or stoves was turned off. As per the Standards of Practice for both the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI) and the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) the inspector does not operate gas shut off valves or light pilot lights during inspections. These appliances were not fully evaluated.
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 12
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
    Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
    Manufacturer: Lennox
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
    Model: HN4940S
    Filter location: In return air duct above furnace
    Model: LB58206D
    Last service date: 11/18/03
    50)   The furnace or boiler flame(s) float above the burner(s). This may be caused by inadequate combustion air, dirty or clogged burners, and/or a clogged flue. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    51)   Combustible materials were found less than two inches from the double wall flue pipe for the oil or gas-fueled furnace or boiler. This is a fire hazard. Combustible materials should be moved, or repairs made by a qualified contractor, as necessary to maintain this clearance.

    Photo 57  
     

    52)   The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
    53)   The estimated useful life for air conditioning compressors is 8 to 15 years. This unit appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

    Photo 47  
     

    54)   The outside condensing unit is not level. Damage may occur if it is more than ten degrees off from level. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as replacing the pad that the condensing unit is installed on.
    55)   Insulation is missing on one or more heating/cooling ducts in unconditioned spaces. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install insulation as necessary and as per standard building practices.
    56)   Ice was found on the air handler's evaporator coils. This is usually caused by a lack of refrigerant in the system due to a leak, or reduced air flow due to dirty filters, bad fan motors, or too many closed vents. This may result in damage to equipment, reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    57)   Supply air from the air conditioning system was not cool enough. It should be 14 to 20 degrees Fahrenheit cooler than at the return duct(s), or current room temperature. This may be caused by refrigerant loss, dirty coils, a failing compressor, an over-sized fan, or a deficient return air system. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    58)   One or more rooms' interior doors have no gap below, or have a gap less than 3/4". As a result, return air flow out of the room is restricted with closed door(s) and the heating/cooling system on. This may result in the heating and/or cooling system having a reduced efficiency and higher energy costs. To allow adequate return air flow, recommend either trimming the bases of doors as necessary to maintain a 3/4" gap below, or leaving doors open while the heating or cooling system is in operation.
    59)   One or more hangers or straps supporting heating/cooling duct work are broken. Permanent repairs should be made by a qualified contractor so ducts are adequately supported.
    60)   Insulation for the outside condensing unit's refrigerant lines is damaged, deteriorated and/or missing in one or more areas. This may result in reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should replace insulation as necessary.
    61)   One or more air supply ducts are disconnected from hangers. A qualified person, tradesman or contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary.
    62)   The air handler's filter(s) are the wrong size. As a result, unfiltered air will flow through the system, and the heating/cooling equipment life and the indoor air quality may be reduced. Correctly sized filter(s) should be installed.
    63)   Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are too close to the outdoor condensing unit. Standard building practices require that there be at least 12 inches of clearance on all sides and at least four to six feet above. Inadequate clearances around the condensing unit can result in reduced efficiency, increased energy costs and/or damage to equipment. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain these clearances.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    64)   Refrigerator shelving is broken and/or missing and should be replaced or repaired as necessary.
    65)   Kitchen floor covering damage. A cut in one location near the stove and shrinkage near the wall to the left of the door.

    Photo 21  
    Kitchen floor covering cut/split

    Photo 22  
    Kitchen floor covering shrinking from edge at wall near rear door.

    66)   The range hood fan vents into the kitchen rather than outdoors. Ventilation may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors. Recommend having a qualified person or tradesman make modifications as necessary as per standard building practices so the range hood fan vents outdoors.
    67)   Minor damage and/or deterioration was found at counter-tops in one or more areas. The client(s) should evaluate and consider having repairs made, and/or counter-tops replaced where necessary.
    68)     Water stains in ceiling over table area. This is below the upstairs bathroom and may have been caused by a previous overflow from a bath or toilet fixture.

    Photo 23  
     
     
    Bathrooms Guest Return to table of contents

    69)   One or more electric receptacles that serve counter-top surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve counter-top surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 61  
     

    70)   The "flapper valve" in one or more toilets did not re-seat after flushing. Significant amounts of water can be lost through such leaks. A qualified person or plumber should evaluate and repair or replace components as necessary.
    71)   Towel hanger rod is bent. For aesthetics reasons this should be repaired or replaced.
     
    Bathroom 1/2 on first level Return to table of contents

    72)   One sink is loose, or not securely attached to the wall behind it. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    73)   Old water stains in ceiling around exhaust fan. This is below the upstairs bathroom and may have been caused by a previous overflow from a bath or toilet fixture.

    Photo 24  
    Water stains in dowstairs bathroom, below second level bathroom.
     
     
    Bathrooms Master Return to table of contents

    74) Tile, stone and/or grout flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing broken tiles and deteriorated grout, and resealing grout. Area is around front of toilet with some small cracks in tiles..

    Photo 59  

    Photo 60  

    75)   Slow drainage from bath tub. Drain should be cleaned on a regular basis with an appropriate cleaner.
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents
    Wall Cracks: Small cracks due to settling of slight shifting of header in dining/living room doorway.
    76)   An insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
    77)   Screen(s) in one or more windows are missing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this. Screens are often removed for window cleaning and they may be stored somewhere. If not, then recommend installing screens where missing.
    78)   Squeaking or creaking noises occur when walking on one or more sections of flooring. This is usually caused by substandard construction practices where the sub-floor decking is not adequately fastened to the framing below. For example, not enough glue was used and/or nails were used rather than screws. In most cases, this is only an annoyance rather than a structural problem. Various solutions such as Squeeeeek No More and Counter Snap fasteners exist to correct this. Repairs to eliminate the squeaks or creaks may be more or less difficult depending on the floor covering, and the access to the underside of the sub-floor. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary. The area of concern was noted to be in the master bedroom at entry to master bath.
    79)   Carpeting in one or more rooms is damaged and/or significantly deteriorated. Recommend replacing carpeting where necessary.

    Photo 36  
     

    80)   French doors in master BR, exterior entrance doors, are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified person or tradesman .

    Photo 35  
     

    81)   The weatherstrip around one or more exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Noted during inspection was the front entry door and the dining room French doors to patio.
    82)   Vinyl flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. This should be reviewed for aesthetic reasons. If need be, a qualified person or tradesman should replace or repair the damaged flooring. This noted in a few spots in the kitchen walk areas and near a window.
    83)   Fixtures such as door stops, towel bars and/or toilet paper holders are damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. Recommend having a qualified person or tradesman replace or repair fixtures as necessary.
    84)   Screen(s) in one or more windows are torn or have holes in them. Screens should be replaced where necessary.
    85)   Minor cracks were found in ceilings in one area. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons. These were nail pops in bonus room that can be patched easily with a commercial Spackle type product from a hardware store.
    86)   Carpeting in one or more rooms is soiled and/or stained. Recommend having carpeting professionally cleaned as necessary.
    87)   The whole-house fan was inoperable during the inspection. The client(s) should consult with the property owner(s) as to how it operates, or have a qualified contractor evaluate and repair if necessary.
    88)   Stains were found in one or more ceiling areas. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found. The stain(s) may be due to plumbing leaks based on their location, below a 2nd level bathroom. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this, and monitoring the stained area(s) in the future. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Note: These are in kitchen and in downstairs bathroom that may have come when master bath had a toilet overflow.

    Photo 53  
     

    89)   Minor cracks were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons. Location in the dining room/living room archway.

    Photo 25  
    Small surface cracks in dining room room, above entry to livingroom.
     

     
    A-DILIGENT INSPECTION
    Kennesaw, GA