Website: http://www.stronghomeinspection.com
Company email: info@stronghomeinspection.com
Inspector's email: pacu1996@yahoo.com
Phone: (914) 497-4193 · (610) 551-1350
Inspector: Neil Napolitano

 

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): John and Jane Doe
Property address: 123 Caveat Emptor Ave
Anytown,USA
Inspection date: 10/23/1996
This report published on Tuesday, January 11, 2011 10:17:12 PM EST

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Wood Destroying Organism Concerns
Concerns relating to wood destroying organisms are shown as follows:
InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
Conducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
Crawl space
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 1045
Type of building: Single family
Time started: 5pm
Time finished: 8pm
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Client(s)
Occupied: No, but furnishings and stored items are present
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Warm
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: West
Main entrance faces: West
Foundation type: Finished basement
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Security system
1) Safety, Comment - Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)

    Photo 58  
    Possible apparent lead paint

    Photo 59  
    Possible apparent asbestos pipe insulation
     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Footing material: Not visible
    Foundation material: Concrete block
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Wall covering: Cement-based clapboard, Brick veneer
    Driveway material: Asphalt
    Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
    Exterior door material: Solid core wood
    2) Safety, Repair/Replace - One or more flights of stairs with more than two risers have no handrail installed. This is a safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install graspable handrails that your hand can completely encircle at stairs where missing, and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 2  
    Left Side

    Photo 10  
    Right side

    3) Safety, Minor Defect - One or more outside faucets are missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

    Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/BODY_AE079

    Photo 8  

    Photo 13  

    4) Repair/Replace, Evaluate , Damage - Rot was found in many areas on soffit boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.

    Photo 9  
    Right rear corner
     

    5) Repair/Replace, Evaluate , Damage - Rot was found in one or more areas . A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.

    Photo 14  

    Photo 16  

    6) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Sidewalks and/or patios have significant cracks and/or deterioration in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary.
    Also (see #15)

    Photo 28  
     

    7) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles appear to have no power. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    8) Repair/Replace , Conducive conditions - The perimeter grading slopes towards the structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Wet soil may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Recommend grading soil so it slopes down and away from the structure with a slope of at least 5% (10% or better is optimal) for at least 6 feet.

    Photo 7  

    Photo 15  

    9) Repair/Replace , Conducive conditions - One or more downspouts are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should install downspout(s) where missing. Also recommend installing extensions such as splashblocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines as necessary to carry rainwater away from the house.

    Photo 11  
    Left rear patio
     

    10) Repair/Replace , Conducive conditions - One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.

    Photo 6  

    Photo 12  

    11) Repair/Maintain, Monitor - Major cracks and/or deterioration were found in one or more retaining walls. Recommend repairing cracks with mortar, elastomeric sealant, or other suitable material to prevent water intrusion and further deterioration. The client(s) should monitor such walls in the future for continued deterioration (cracking, leaning, bowing, etc.). Repairs and/or replacement by a qualified contractor may be necessary in the future.

    Photo 26  
     

    12) Repair/Maintain , Conducive conditions - One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.

    Photo 34  

    Photo 35  

    13) Repair/Maintain , Conducive conditions - Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

    Photo 4  

    Photo 5  

    14) Maintain , Conducive conditions - Trees and/or shrubs are in contact with or are close to the roof edge(s) in one or more areas. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects.

    Photo 22  

    Photo 3  

    15) Maintain , Conducive conditions - The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Inadequate
    16) Major Defect, Repair/Replace, Evaluate , Conducive conditions - The roof surface material is beyond or at the end of its service life and needs replacing now. The client(s) should consult with a qualified roofing contractor to determine replacement options and costs.

    Photo 17  

    Photo 18  

    17) Repair/Replace, Evaluate , Conducive conditions - One or more sections of roof flashing are deteriorated and/or rusted. Leaks have occurred as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and replace flashing where necessary.

    Photo 24  
    Active leaking on skylight

    Photo 27  
    Vent stack

    18) Repair/Replace, Evaluate , Conducive conditions - One or more sections of flashing at the base of the chimney are deteriorated and/or substandard. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 20  

    Photo 21  

    19) Maintain , Conducive conditions - Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.

    Photo 23  

    Photo 25  
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    20) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - The auto-reverse mechanism on the vehicle door opener is inoperable or requires too much force to activate. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html or http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html
    21) Safety, Repair/Replace - The garage-house door poses a fire risk because it's not fire-rated (metal or solid-core construction). A qualified contractor should replace this door with a fire-rated door.
    22) Safety, Repair/Replace - The garage-house door isn't equipped with an automatic closing device such as sprung hinges. This door should close and latch automatically to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces and/or to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should install automatic closing device(s) as necessary, and as per standard building practices, so this door closes and latches automatically.
    23) Repair/Replace - The garage vehicle door is damaged or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the door as necessary.

    Photo 1  
     
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
    24) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate , Conducive conditions - Paper facing on batt insulation is oriented towards open spaces, rather than against interior space surfaces. This occurs when newer, fiberglass batt insulation with paper facing on one side is installed backwards or upside down, or when older batt insulation wrapped on both sides with paper is installed. The paper facing is flammable. Newer insulation usually has a warning label indicating this on the facing.

    For newer batt insulation with paper facing on one side only, the paper facing should be oriented towards interior spaces rather than exposed, open spaces. The existing insulation should be reinstalled or replaced.

    For older batt insulation with paper facing on both sides, recommend that repairs be made as necessary to eliminate the exposed paper facing.

    A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, and as per standard building practices and the insulation manufacturer's recommendations to eliminate the fire hazard.

    Also, the paper facing also acts as a vapor barrier, and if located away from the interior surfaces, can trap moisture from condensation in the cavity between the paper facing and the interior spaces. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects. The inspector was unable to evaluate the structure obscured by the insulation. When repairs are made, the exposed structure should be evaluated for damage by wood destroying insects and/or organisms, and repairs should be made if necessary.

    Photo 29  
     

    25) Repair/Replace, Evaluate , Conducive conditions - One or more areas of the roof structure were wet or had elevated levels of moisture at the time of the inspection. There appears to be an active leak in the roof or structure exterior. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 31  

    Photo 32  
    Apparent mold growth on sheathing

    26) Repair/Replace, Evaluate , Conducive conditions - One or more exhaust fan ducts are broken and/or have fallen down, or somehow terminate in the attic. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary and as per standard building practices, so all exhaust air is vented outside.

    Photo 30  
     

    27) Repair/Replace, Evaluate , Conducive conditions - Ventilation is substandard in the attic. Inadequate attic ventilation may result in high attic and roof surface temperatures, reduce the life of the roof covering materials and increase cooling costs. High levels of moisture are also likely, and can be a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require one square foot of vent area for 150 to 200 square feet of attic space. Vents should be evenly distributed between soffits, ridges and at corners to promote air circulation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install vents as per standard building practices.
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Underground
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 150
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: Garage
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    System ground: Cold water supply pipes
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 150
    Branch circuit wiring type: Copper
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    28) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses) are "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire. This is a safety hazard since the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks and fires may result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 38  
     

    29) Minor Defect, Comment - Ground wire should be colored green to identify it as a grounding conductor,Not a concern

    Photo 39  

    Photo 46  
    Cold water ground (also:no jumper strap)
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Estimated age: 1996
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    Manufacturer: Rheem
    30) Safety, Repair/Replace - No drain line is installed for the temperature-pressure relief valve. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified plumber should install a drain line as per standard building practices. For example, extending to 6 inches from the floor, or routed so as to drain outside.

    Photo 33  
     

    31) Major Defect, Comment - The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater is above this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    Cost estimate: $ 800-1000
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Hot water, Circulating pump
    Manufacturer: Burnham
    Model: Holiday
    32) Evaluate, Comment - The inspector was unable to determine the age of the furnace. The clients should be aware that this furnace may be near, at, or beyond its useful life and may need replacing at any time. Recommend attempting to determine the furnace's age (ask property owner or service technician), and budgeting for a replacement if necessary.
    Cost estimate: $ 4500-6000

    Photo 37  
     
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Under Basement stairs
    Location of main water meter: Under Basement stairs
    Location of main fuel shut-off: Garage
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Copper
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Cast iron
    Drain pipe material: Cast iron
    Waste pipe material: Cast iron
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Woodstove type: Metal
    Chimney type: Masonry
    33) Safety, Repair/Replace - One or more chimney flues do not have a screened cover installed. Screened covers prevent the following:

  • Fire hazard from wood fire sparks and embers exiting flues
  • Wildlife (birds, rodents, raccoons, etc.) entering flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install screened cover(s) where missing. Screens should have holes 1/4 inch or larger.

    Photo 19  
     

    34) Evaluate, Comment - Keep in mind.....Most states require permits for wood burning stoves.

    Photo 40  
    Basement stove

    Photo 55  
    Main level stove

    35) Comment - All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    36) Safety, Minor Defect - Cover plate(s) are broken at one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be replaced where necessary.

    Photo 41  
     

    37) Repair/Replace, Evaluate, Monitor , Conducive conditions - Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement ceiling.This was caused by a plumbing leak from the floor above. Water is a conducive condition for wood destroying organisms as well as mold and should not be present in the home.

    Photo 42  

    Photo 43  

    38) Repair/Replace, Evaluate , Conducive conditions - Standing water and/or wet areas were found in one or more sections of the basement. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. A qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.

    Photo 36  
    Apparent mold growth on walls

    Photo 45  
    Carpeting was wet at the time of the inspection
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    39) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 62  
     

    40) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more stove top burners are inoperable. A qualified appliance technician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 63  
    Left front burner not functioning
     

    41) Comment - All of the kitchen appliances appear to be near, at, or beyond their intended service life of 10 to 15 years. Recommend budgeting for replacements as necessary.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    42) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more wall-mounted electric switches are within reach of shower stalls. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. At a minimum, the client(s) should be aware of the shock hazard this represents and never operate such switches while showering. Ideally, a qualified electrician should evaluate and move switches as necessary, or a qualified contractor should make modifications as necessary so wall switches are unreachable from shower stalls.

    Photo 49  
     

    43) Safety, Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 44  

    Photo 51  

    44) Repair/Replace, Evaluate , Conducive conditions - Tile and/or grout in one or more showers is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, deteriorated or missing grout, cracked, missing or loose tiles, etc. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair tile and/or grout as necessary.
    45) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - One or more cabinets and/or drawers are damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace cabinets and/or components as necessary.
    46) Repair/Replace - One or more toilet tank lids are missing. Lid(s) should be replaced as necessary.
    47) Evaluate - One or more toilets could not be fully evaluated. The shut-off valve(s) may be turned off, or repairs may be necessary. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this, and have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair if necessary.

    Photo 50  
    Hall bath
     
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    48) Repair/Replace, Evaluate , Conducive conditions - Damage,stains and elevated levels of moisture were found in one or more ceiling areas. The stain(s) appear to be due to roof leaks. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 47  
    Master bedroom
     

    49) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Floors in rear addition are not level. Significant repairs may be needed to make floors level, such as repairs to the foundation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 56  
    Sunken subfloor

    Photo 57  
    Significant slope

    50) Repair/Replace, Evaluate - Wood flooring in one or more areas is worn, damaged and/or cupping. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and refinish wood flooring as necessary.

    Photo 48  
    Major water damage master bedroom
     

    51) Repair/Replace - One or more windows are deteriorated in some way. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary so windows open fully, and open and close easily.
    52) Repair/Maintain , Infestation, Damage, Conducive conditions - Rear addition has an infestation of ants that has also caused substantial damage to some of the wood in the structure.Recommend having an exterminator treat the area with the proper insecticide and having a qualified contractor make repairs including fixing any water intrusion issues.

    Photo 53  
    Frass

    Photo 54  
    Live ants

    53) Comment - Minor cracks were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 52  
     
     
    Crawl space Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Wood
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    Vapor barrier present: No
    54) Safety, Major Defect , Damage - Major termite damage was discoverd to the main support beam in the crawlspace.

    Photo 60  
     

    55) Repair/Replace , Conducive conditions - No vapor barrier is installed. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should install a vapor barrier. Standard building practices require the following:

  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

    Better building practices require that:

  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.
     
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