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Georgia Pro Inspection Co. LLC

Website: http://www.Georgia-Pro.com
Email: GeorgiaProHomeInspections@gmail.com
Phone: (770) 655-0536
Inspector: Ryan Roberts

  

Home Inspection Report
(Sample)

Client(s):  Your Name Here
Property address:  Your Address Here
Metro Atlanta, GA
Inspection date:  Wednesday, December 10, 2014

This report published on Friday, December 19, 2014 9:39:51 PM EST

This report is the exclusive property of Georgia Pro Inspection Company, LLC and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Concern typeSafetyPoses a risk of injury or death
Concern typeMajor DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense
Concern typeRepair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing
Concern typeRepair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance
Concern typeMinor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense
Concern typeMaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance
Concern typeEvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist
Concern typeMonitorRecommend monitoring in the future
Concern typeCommentFor your information
Concern typeDamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.)
Concern typeConducive conditionsConditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.)

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.Contact your inspector If there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Crawl space
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms


General information
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Inspector's name: Ryan Roberts
Structures inspected: Single Family Home
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 40 years/1974
Time started: 10:00am
Time finished: 2:05pm
Inspection Fee: $XXX.XX
Present during inspection: Client(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Cold
Ground condition: Dry
Front of structure faces: South
Main entrance faces: South
Foundation type: Finished basement, Crawlspace
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Security system, Irrigation system, Hot tub, Shed, Dock
1) One or more leaks were found in gas supply lines, fittings and/or valves. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of explosion. A qualified contractor and/or the gas utility company should evaluate and make repairs as soon as possible.

At gas meter before it enters structure; verified with combustible gas detector
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2) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
3) Many wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by large amounts of furniture and/or stored items. Many areas couldn't be evaluated.
Exterior
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Footing material: Not visible
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Cement-based panels, Wood shakes, Stone veneer, Stucco
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core wood
4) Guardrails are missing from one or more sections of decks or elevated surfaces with high drop-offs. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. Standard building practices require guardrails to be installed at drop-offs higher than 30 inches, but in some cases it is advised to install them at shorter drop-offs. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install guardrails as necessary and as per standard building practices.

Front porch
Left/W side of home; deck
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5) DamageConducive conditions One or more wooden deck support posts are in contact with soil, and are rotten. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require that there be at least 6" of space between any wood and the soil below, even if the wood is treated. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as replacing rotten posts, or trimming rotten post bases and installing concrete and metal post bases. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. Otherwise recommend installing borate based Impel rods to prevent rot. For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=impel+rods
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6) One or more retaining walls higher than three feet exist on this property and guardrails or barriers are missing or inadequate. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. At a minimum, the client(s) should be aware of this hazard, especially when children are present. Ideally a qualified contractor should install adequate guardrails or make modifications to existing barriers as necessary above retaining walls higher than 3 feet to eliminate fall hazards. Dense shrubbery or vegetation may be acceptable as a barrier, but only when mature enough to be effective.

Front
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7) One or more areas of the deck structure are damaged or deteriorated and in need of repair. A qualified contractor should evalaute and make repairs as necessary.

Left/W side of home
Back deck; several places
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8) Conducive conditions Perimeter pavement slopes towards structure in one or more areas. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Recommend having a qualified contractor make repairs as necessary so perimeter pavement slopes down and away from the structure.

Front; between garage and front door
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9) Damage Rot was found in one or more areas on fascia boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood. Including but not limited to:

Left/W side of home near back; main level window frame
Front left/SW corner of garage; behind gutter
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10) Conducive conditions Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion. Including but not limited to:

Front; panels below upper level window
Back deck; main level in several places
Back; under deck and on Crawlspace door
Right/E side of home near back; under deck
Front; upper level where shakes are close to roof edge
Front of garage; where shakes contact roof edge
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11) Conducive conditions Cracks, deterioration and/or damage were found in one or more areas of the stucco siding. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace stucco siding as necessary. Including but not limited to:

Left/W side of home; several places
Front above garage door; several places
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12) The driveway has significant cracks and/or deterioration in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace driveway sections as necessary.
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13) Fascia boards are damaged or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. Including but not limited to:

Front; below upper level window
Front of garage; fascia behind gutter damaged by bees
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14) Conducive conditions Wood beams, joists and/or support posts are too close to the soil in some areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require the following clearances to soil below:

Efforts should be made, such as grading and/or removing soil, to maintain these clearances. If this is not practical, then installing borate based Impel rods may help to prevent infestation and damage. For more information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=impel+rods

Left/W side of home
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15) Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.
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16) One or more exhaust duct end caps are missing. Their purpose is to prevent unconditioned air from entering the house, and keep out birds, rodents and insects. Blocked ducts can cause fan motors and/or clothes dryers to overheat and may pose a fire hazard. Vent cap(s) should be installed where necessary.

Right/E side of home; under deck
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17) Conducive conditions One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
Garage floor
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18) Conducive conditions Soil is in contact with or less than six inches from siding and/or trim. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Soil should be graded and/or removed as necessary so there are at least six inches of space between the siding and trim and the soil below.

Back
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19) Conducive conditions Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
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20) Conducive conditions Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit:
The Ins and Outs of Caulking.

many places
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21) Conducive conditions The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.

Fascia/trim in several places
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22) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

Front porch
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23) Conducive conditions One or more downspouts terminate above roof surfaces rather than being routed to gutters below or to the ground level. This is very common, but it can reduce the life of roof surface materials below due to large amounts of water frequently flowing over the roof surface. Granules typically are washed off of composition shingles as a result, and leaks may occur. Recommend considering having a qualified contractor install extensions as necessary so downspouts don't terminate above roof surfaces.
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24) One or more sections of foundation and/or exterior walls are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from vegetation, debris and/or stored items.
25) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
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26) The substructure of the deck is excluded from the inspection due to limited access because of the low height.
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27) One or more light fixtures have missing bulbs and could not be fully evaluated. Bulbs may simply need to be installed, or repairs or replacement may be necessary.

Right/E side of home near back; floodlight
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Roof
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Roof inspection method: Viewed from ground with binoculars; partially traversed (where possible)
Roof type: Cross-hipped
Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles, Metal
Estimated age of roof: 5 years/2009
Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
Roof ventilation: Adequate
28) Conducive conditions One or more composition shingles are damaged, deteriorated and/or missing, and should be replaced. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

Front at ridge above garage
Back, main level in several places; cracks/split
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29) Conducive conditions One or more composition shingles have raised, most likely due to nails that have loosened. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as reseating nails.

Many; minor
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30) Conducive conditions The siding on one or more exterior walls above lower roof sections is in contact with or has less than a one inch gap between it and the roof surface below. A gap of at least one inch is recommended so water isn't wicked up into the siding from the shingles below, and also to provide room for additional layers of roofing materials when the current roof surface fails. Recommend having a qualified contractor make repairs as necessary, such as trimming siding, so at least a one inch gap exists between the siding and the roofing below where necessary.

Front
Back; upper level
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31) Conducive conditions Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.
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32) Conducive conditions Debris such as leaves, needles, seeds, etc. have accumulated on the roof. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since water may not flow easily off the roof, and may enter gaps in the roof surface. Leaks may occur as a result. Debris should be cleaned from the roof now and as necessary in the future.
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Garage
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33) The garage-house door isn't equipped with an automatic closing device such as sprung hinges. This door should close and latch automatically to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces and/or to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should install automatic closing device(s) as necessary, and as per standard building practices, so this door closes and latches automatically.
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34) Standing water and/or wet areas were found in one or more sections of the garage. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the garage. A qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Garage; front of home and both sides of garage door
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35) Conducive conditions Water stains are visible on the vehicle door. This is a sign of water intrusion. No significant repairs appear to be needed, but gaps should be sealed with caulk to prevent water damage. Exterior surfaces should be maintained with paint, stain or finish as necessary.
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36) Much of the garage, including areas around the interior perimeter and in the center are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.
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Attic
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Inspection method: Partially traversed
Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
37) Ceiling insulation is uneven in some areas. This is likely due to someone having walked on or through the insulation. Recommend installing additional insulation where necessary to restore the original R rating.

Upper level back left corner bedroom near back wall; verified with IR camera
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38) No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.
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39) No weatherstrip is installed around the attic access hatch. Weatherstrip should be installed around the hatch to prevent heated interior air from entering attic.
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40) Some attic areas were inaccessible due to lack of permanently installed walkways, the possibility of damage to insulation, low height and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
Electric service
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Primary service type: Overhead
Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
Service amperage (amps): 200
Service voltage (volts): 120/240
Location of main service switch: Right/E side of home
Location of sub panels: Basement closet
Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
Smoke detectors present: Yes
41) The service drop wires are less than 3 feet from one or more doors, balconies, decks and/or windows that open. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician and/or the utility company should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Right/E side of home
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42) One or more knockouts have been removed inside the main service panel where no wires and bushings are installed, and no cover(s) have been installed to seal the hole(s). This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. A qualified electrician should install knockout covers where missing.
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Water heater
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Estimated age: Unknown
Type: Instantaneous
Energy source: Natural gas
Manufacturer: AquaStar
Model: Not accessible
Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 113 degrees
Heating and cooling
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Estimated age: 5-8 years (estimated)
Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
Primary heat system type: Forced air
Primary A/C energy source: Electric
Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
Manufacturer: Heil
Filter location: In return air duct below furnace
43) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.

Upper level unit
44) The estimated useful life for air conditioning compressors is 8 to 15 years. This unit appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
45) No filter is visible for the heating/cooling system. As a result, unfiltered air will flow through the system, and the heating/cooling equipment life and the indoor air quality may be reduced. Correctly sized filter(s) should be installed. If necessary, guides or retaining devices should be installed or repaired so filter(s) are securely anchored and gaps around edges are minimized.

Basement unit
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46) The cooling fins on the outdoor condensing unit's evaporator coils are dirty. This may result in reduced efficiency and higher energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should clean the evaporator coils as necessary.
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47) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are too close to the outdoor condensing unit. Standard building practices require that there be at least 12 inches of clearance on all sides and at least four to six feet above. Inadequate clearances around the condensing unit can result in reduced efficiency, increased energy costs and/or damage to equipment. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain these clearances.
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48) Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.

Upper level unit
49) The outdoor air temperature was below 60 degrees Fahrenheit during the inspection. Because of this, the inspector was unable to operate and fully evaluate the cooling system.
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Plumbing and laundry
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Water service: Public
50) The clothes dryer is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html
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51) Copper water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:

For more information visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html
http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html
52) Recommend having the septic tank inspected. Recommend having the tank pumped if it was last pumped more than 3 years ago.
53) The water supply pressure is below 40 psi, and the flow appears to be inadequate. 40-80 psi is considered to be the normal range for water pressure in a home. The inspector performed a "functional flow test" during the inspection, where multiple fixtures are run simultaneously, and found there to be low flow. For example, the shower flow decreased significantly when the toilet was flushed. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair or make modifications as necessary. Installing a pressure boosting system is one possible solution. For information, visit:
http://www.google.com/search?q=low+water+pressure

Basement half bath; cold water
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Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
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Fireplace type: Masonry
Chimney type: Masonry
54) One or more gas fireplaces and/or stoves did not respond when the controls were operated. This may be due to the pilot light being turned off, the gas supply being turned off, or any number of other reasons. As a result, these appliances were not fully evaluated. As per the Standards of Practice for both the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI) and the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) the inspector does not operate gas shut off valves or light pilot lights during inspections. Recommend consulting with the property owner(s) as to how the fireplace(s) and/or stove(s) operate, and/or having a gas appliance contractor evaluate and repair if necessary.

Main level
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55) No controls were found to operate one or more gas fireplaces and/or stoves. For example, a thermostat or on-off switch. These appliance were not fully evaluated. Recommend consulting with the property owner(s) as to how they operate, and/or having a gas appliance contractor evaluate and repair if necessary.

Basement bathroom/bedroom; no controls found
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56) A "Vent-free" gas fireplace is installed. While these are legal in some municipalities, the client(s) should be aware that exhaust gases from these appliances are vented directly into the living space where they are located. Exhaust gases may contain very high levels of moisture (up to 25%), which can be be detrimental to a house over time. Additionally, some unpleasant odors may be emitted.

Main level
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Crawl space
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Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
Vapor barrier present: Yes
57) Conducive conditions Paper facing on batt insulation is oriented towards open spaces, rather than against interior space surfaces. This occurs when newer, fiberglass batt insulation with paper facing on one side is installed backwards or upside down, or when older batt insulation wrapped on both sides with paper is installed. The paper facing is flammable. Newer insulation usually has a warning label indicating this on the facing.

For newer batt insulation with paper facing on one side only, the paper facing should be oriented towards interior spaces rather than exposed, open spaces. The existing insulation should be reinstalled or replaced.

For older batt insulation with paper facing on both sides, recommend that repairs be made as necessary to eliminate the exposed paper facing.

A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, and as per standard building practices and the insulation manufacturer's recommendations to eliminate the fire hazard.

Also, the paper facing also acts as a vapor barrier, and if located away from the interior surfaces, can trap moisture from condensation in the cavity between the paper facing and the interior spaces. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects. The inspector was unable to evaluate the structure obscured by the insulation. When repairs are made, the exposed structure should be evaluated for damage by wood destroying insects and/or organisms, and repairs should be made if necessary.
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58) Conducive conditions No vapor barrier is installed in some areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should install a vapor barrier where missing. Standard building practices require the following:
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59) Some crawl space areas were inaccessible due to low height (less than 18 inches), ductwork or pipes blocking, standing water, and/or stored items. These areas are excluded from this inspection.
Basement
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60) Conducive conditions Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the basement. For example, water stains and/or efflorescence on the foundation or floor, water stains at bases of support posts, etc. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in the basement include:

Ideally, water should not enter the basement, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing sump pump(s) or interior perimeter drains.

Basement front wall; several places

Trim at floor/carpet are rotten and damp spots were confirmed with moisture meter.
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Kitchen
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61) The point-of-use hot water dispenser is inoperable. Recommend asking the property owner(s) about this and if necessary, having a qualified plumber repair, replace or remove the hot water dispenser.
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62) Conducive conditions Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.
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63) Water stains and/or minor water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below the sink. The client(s) should evaluate and consider having repairs made.
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Bathrooms
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64) One or more ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) electric receptacles did not trip when tested with the inspector's test instrument. These devices should trip when tested with a test instrument in addition to tripping via the test buttons on the receptacles. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Upper level W side bathroom
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65) Conducive conditions One or more exhaust fans is inoperable or provides inadequate air flow. Moisture may accumulate as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace the fan or make repairs as necessary.

Upper level guest bathroom; falling down from ceiling
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66) Conducive conditions One or more toilets are loose. A qualified contractor should remove the toilet(s) for further evaluation and repairs if necessary. A new wax ring should be installed and toilet(s) should be securely anchored to the floor to prevent movement and leaking.

Basement bathroom; urinal
Upper level W side bathroom
Main level half bath
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67) Conducive conditions Tile and/or grout in one or more showers is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, deteriorated or missing grout, cracked, missing or loose tiles, etc. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair tile and/or grout as necessary.

Upper level guest bathroom
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68) One or more faucets leak by handle(s) or at their base when turned on. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Upper level W side bathroom
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69) One or more sinks are loose, or not securely attached to the wall behind it. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Main level half bath
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70) One or more sink stopper mechanisms are missing, or need adjustment or repair. Stopper mechanisms should be installed where missing and/or repairs should be made so sink stoppers open and close easily.

Basement full bath; right sink
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71) One or more sink drains use flexible drain pipe. This type of drain pipe is more likely to clog than smooth wall pipe. Recommend having a qualified plumber replace this pipe with standard plumbing components (smooth wall pipe) to prevent clogged drains.

Upper level W side bathroom
Upper level guest bathroom
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72) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

Basement bathroom
Upper level guest bathroom; left vanity light (no bulbs)
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Interior rooms
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73) One or more open ground, three-pronged grounding type receptacles were found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

Grounding type receptacles were first required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and/or the absence of 2-pronged receptacles, repairs should be made by correcting wiring circuits as necessary so all receptacles are grounded as per standard building practices. Replacement of three-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles is not an acceptable solution.

Upper level left/W side bedroom; front portion of room, at least 5 or more
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74) Some ceiling areas in this structure have "popcorn" textured surfaces possibly installed prior to 1979. This material may contain asbestos, which is a known carcinogen and poses a health hazard. Laws were passed in the United States in 1978 prohibiting use of asbestos in residential structures, but stocks of existing materials have been known to be used for some time thereafter. The client(s) may wish to have this ceiling material tested by a qualified lab to determine if it does contain asbestos.

In most cases, when the material is intact and in good condition, keeping it encapsulated with paint and not disturbing it may reduce or effectively eliminate the health hazard. If the client wishes to remove the material, or plans to disturb it through remodeling, they should have it tested by a qualified lab and/or consult with a qualified industrial hygienist or asbestos abatement specialist. For more information, visit:
http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/453.html
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75) Conducive conditions Tile, stone and/or grout flooring is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing broken tiles and deteriorated grout, and resealing grout.

Main level back office; tile
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76) Glass in one or more windows is broken. A qualified contractor should replace glass where necessary.

Basement
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77) One or more doors will not latch when closed. Repairs should be made as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. For example, aligning strike plates with latch bolts and/or replacing locksets.

Upper level back right corner bedroom closet door
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78) There are several areas where air gaps exist around windows and/or doors. A qualified contractor should evaluate, seal and/or replace weatherstripping as necessary.

All three levels of home; windows and doors
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79) There are several areas where air gaps exist around the home. Some of these areas are not accessible without removing drywall but any accessible areas should be evaluated and additional insulation added if necessary.

Basement
Main level
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80) One or more light fixtures appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.

Upper level back right corner bedroom (2)
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81) Minor cracks were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

Garage ceiling
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82) Minor cracks and/or deterioration was found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

Upper level W side bathroom; between shower and toilet (damaged from moisture)

Upper level back right corner bedroom
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Main Electrical Panel (Inside View)
 

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