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Detailed Home Inspections

Website: http://www.DetailedInspections.com
Email: sudelle@comcast.net
Phone: (770) 572-3869 · (877) 388-3508
FAX: (770) 783-6600
Inspector: Steven Udelle

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Mr.Seymour Walkthrooz
Property address: 1234 Your St.
Yourtown, Ga 30600
Inspection date: 5/8/2010
This report published on Saturday, May 08, 2010 7:04:51 PM EDT

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Crawl space
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 12345
Inspector's name: Steven Udelle
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 35
Property owner's name: Mr. Seymour Walkthrooz
Time started: 10am
Inspection Fee: $295
Payment method: Check
Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: No, but furnishings and stored items are present
Weather conditions: Intermittant rain during inspection
Temperature: Warm 78 degrees F
Ground condition: wet
Front of structure faces: North
Main entrance faces: North
Foundation type: Crawlspace
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Security system, Hot tub, Private well, Shed, Playground equipment, Sauna, Low voltage outdoor lighting, Central vacuum system, Water filtration system, Water softener system, Built-in sound system, Intercom system, Generator system, Sport court, Sea wall, Outbuildings
1) Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)
     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Footing material: Masonry
    Foundation material: Concrete block
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame, Concrete block
    Wall covering: Wood panels, Stucco
    Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
    Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete, Paving stones
    Exterior door material: Solid core wood, Solid core fiberglass
    2) One or more trip hazards were found in sidewalk and/or patio sections due to cracks, settlement and/or heaving. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary to eliminate trip hazards.

    Photo 3  
    Potential trip hazard. Repair or Replace.
     

    3) Recommend contacting Pest Control to prevent the homeowner becoming food source.

    Photo 72  
    Neighbor interrupted inspection to borrow a cup of sugar
     

    4) Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit:
    The Ins and Outs of Caulking.

    Photo 73  
    Window trim is decayed
     

    5) Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.

    Photo 62  
    Decayed siding

    Photo 73  
    Window trim is decayed

    Photo 74  
    T-111 siding at rear has come loose. This could possibly allow the intrusion of pests and/or moisture.
     

    6) Rot was found in one or more areas on fascia boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.

    Photo 58  
    Decay on fascia board
     

    7) One or more landscaping timbers are rotten or damaged by wood destroying insects. Landscaping timbers should be replaced as necessary.

    Photo 1  
    Railroad timber as landscape borders invites wood-destroying insects.
     

    8) One or more downspouts are missing. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should install downspout(s) where missing. Also recommend installing extensions such as splashblocks or tie-ins to underground drain lines as necessary to carry rainwater away from the house.

    Photo 59  
    Missing downspout
     

    9) One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.

    Photo 2  
    Recommend 90 degree elbow to divert water away from siding
     

    10) One or more gutters were leaking during the inspection. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. A qualified contractor should replace or repair gutters where necessary.

    Photo 67  
    Leaking gutter seams
     

    11) Gaps exist at one or more openings around the exterior, such as those where outside faucets, refrigerant lines, and/or gas supply pipes penetrate the exterior. Gaps should be sealed as necessary to prevent moisture intrusion and entry by vermin.

    Photo 60  
    Exposed sub-fascia

    Photo 63  
    Loose brick facing and exposed window framing. Potential area of water intrusion.

    12) One or more soffit vent screens are missing and/or deteriorated. Birds and vermin may enter the attic because of this. Screens should be replaced or repaired where necessary, or installed where missing.

    Photo 64  
    Holes in gable vent screen
     

    13) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply).
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair).

    Photo 17  
    Typical expansion/settlement cracks

    Photo 19  
    Typical crack. No control joints present.

    14) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.
    15) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
    16) Minor cracks were found in one or more sidewalk or patio sections. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
    17)   Front entry door jams are decayed. Have jambs repaired/replaced by qualified contractor.

    Photo 57  
    Decay on exterior door jambs
     

    18)   A trip hazaed exisits near the septic tank where soil has sunk, creating a depression in the grade. There is potential for injury from a trip/fall. Have repaired by a qualified person.

    Photo 4  
    Trip hazard near septic tank

    Photo 5  
    trip hazaed near septic tank stubout.
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Gable, Hipped
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 15
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    19) Evidence of a leaking roof. Moisture stains on livingroom ceiling and attic sheathing. Have evaluated by licensed roofing contractor.

    Photo 25  
    Area of water intrusion in attic near front entry

    Photo 27  
    Stain from active roof leak

    20) One or more sections of roof flashing are deteriorated and/or rusted. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and replace flashing where necessary.

    Photo 60  
    Exposed sub-fascia

    Photo 61  
    exposed sub-fascia

    21) One or more composition shingles are damaged, deteriorated and/or missing, and should be replaced. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 55  
    Missing shingle on hip kingpost

    Photo 69  
    Missing shingle

    Photo 70  
    Missing shingle

    Photo 71  
    Missing shingle

    22) Roofing nails in one or more areas have loosened or backed out. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as reseating nails and applying sealant.
    23) Decay on chinmney siding. Recommend repair by qualified contractor.
    24) Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.

    Photo 56  
    Debris in gutters

    Photo 68  
    Leaves in gutters

    25) Trees are overhanging roof and are within 10 feet of roof vertically. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since organic debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate on the roof surface. Accumulated debris may cause water to enter gaps in the roof surface and leak into attic and/or interior spaces. Trees should be pruned so they are at least 10 feet above roof, or don't overhang the roof.
    26)   Ridge Vent roofing nails are loose and backing out. Recommend repair by qualified contractor.
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    27) The infrared "photo eye" devices that trigger the vehicle door opener's auto-reverse feature were inoperable during the inspection. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs or replace components as necessary. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html
    http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html

    28) The garage vehicle door is damaged or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the door as necessary.

    Photo 15  
    Dented garage door sectional panels

    Photo 23  
    Damage to overhead garage door track rail

    Photo 31  
    Missing roller wheel on garage door
     

    29) the side garage exterior entrance door jamb is decayed and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.

    Photo 57  
    Decay on exterior door jambs
     

    30)   The side rails of the attic pulldown stairs are damaged. Have repaired/repalced by qualified contractor.

    Photo 21  
    Damaged right leg of attic pulldown stairs

    Photo 22  
    Damaged left leg of attic pulldown stairs
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Roof structure type: Trusses, Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Trusses
    Insulation material: Fiberglass loose fill, Fiberglass roll or batt
    Insulation estimated R value: R-30
    31) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
    32) All smoke detectors failed under test. Repair/replace
    33) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
    34) Cover plate(s) are broken at one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be replaced where necessary.
    35) Evidence of decay on subfascia and roof sheathing (plywood) in attic near front entry due to active roof leak. Have evaluated/repaired by qualified contractor.

    Photo 25  
    Area of water intrusion in attic near front entry

    Photo 27  
    Stain from active roof leak

    36) Ceiling and wall insulation is missing in some areas. Recommend installing insulation where missing for better energy efficiency.

    Photo 26  
    Insulation fell down from attic wall on other side of hallway access door
     

    37)   Recommend having qualified contractor re-install attic light fixture. It is dangling from it's wiring.
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: At service panel in Garage
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
    Branch circuit wiring type: Copper
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    38) One or more overcurrent protection devices (circuit breakers or fuses) are "double tapped", where 2 or more wires are clamped in a terminal designed for only one wire. This is a safety hazard since the bolt or screw may tighten securely against one wire, but leave others loose. Arcing, sparks and fires may result. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 48  
    Double tapped breaker

    Photo 49  
    Another double tap at left side of panel

    Photo 50  
    Double tap at lower section of panel
     

    39) One or more bushings are missing from where wires enter holes in the main service panel. This is a safety hazard since the wiring insulation can be cut or abraded on the metal edge of the hole(s). A qualified electrician should install bushings where missing.

    Photo 47  
    Main disconnect panel missing grommet. Romex jacket is cut. This is not the proper Romex for outdoor use.

    Photo 51  
    Service panel is missing protective grommet

    40) Loose engergized wire in crawlspace does not terminate inside box or receptacle. Refer to electrician.

    Photo 81  
     

    41) Interior romex wires on concrete pad are energized (hot). This romex needs to be exterior type (gray, waterproof jacket) and terminate in a box or receptacle. Refer to an electrician.

    Photo 83  

    Photo 84  

    42) Pool equipment ground wire was removed. Refer to electrician.

    Photo 87  

    Photo 88  

    43) Switchplate in dining room and receptacle cover plate in laundry room missing. Refer to electrician.

    Photo 85  

    Photo 89  

    44) Broken switch coverplate in attic. Refer to electrician.

    Photo 76  
     

    45) Attic light fixture not connected to box. refer to electricain.

    Photo 78  
     

    46) Side exterior receptacle not on GFCI nor does it have a waterproof cover. Refer to electrician.

    Photo 93  
     

    47) Exterior receptacle in rear does not have waterproof cover. refer to electrician.

    Photo 80  
     

    48) Exposed romex wiring inside of guest bedroom closet is not in raceway nor are the splices in a box. Refer to electrician.

    Photo 95  
     

    49) Romex wiring should not be used for a hot water heater nor should connections be outside the unit unless in a box. Refer to electrician for proper installation.

    Photo 91  
     

    50) Wires that went to spa that was removed were left energized where they terminate in disconnect box. Refer to electricain.

    Photo 90  

    Photo 92  

    51) All smoke detectors failed under test. Repair / replace.

    Photo 102  

    Photo 103  

    52) Guest bathroom receptacle not on a GFCI circuit. Refer to electrician.

    Photo 53  
    Ungrounded receptacle and non-GFCI nor on a GFCI circuit
     

    53) Interior Romex wire used in an exterior application. Refer to electrician.

    Photo 82  
     

    54) Exterior timer is missing it's faceplate and box cover. Refer to an electrician.

    Photo 86  

    Photo 94  

    55) Loose receptacle box in kitchen. Refer to electrician.

    Photo 52  
    Loose receptacle box
     

    56) Seller had an "Energized" panel padlocked! This is a satety hazard! Never lock a service panel with the power on.


    It is o.k. to put a lock on a service panel if the power if off and wish it to remain off.

    Photo 54  
    Energized panel is padlocked! Safety concern.
     

    57)   Exterior rear receptacle is missing it's combination faceplate/waterproof cover. Refer to electricain.

    Photo 79  
     

    58)   Exposed live conductor on interior style romex due to damage. Refer to electrician.

    Photo 77  
     
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 10 yrs
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Electricity
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    Manufacturer: A.O. Smith
    Model: fg-456-ed4356
    Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 120 Degrees F
    59) The temperature-pressure relief valve drain line is routed upwards. This drain line should be routed either down or horizontally. This is a safety hazard as water may not be able to flow through the drain line adequately when the valve releases due to accumulated water. Also, accumulated water may corrode the valve and prevent it from working. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair so the drain line is routed down or horizontally, but not up. This drainline terminates in a bathroom shower!! It is currently disconnected from TPR valve at Hot Water Heater. Recommend it's immediate removal from shower and have hole that remains repaired by qualified mechanic. For more information, visit:
    Water Heater Rescue - Down and Out

    Photo 11  
    Terminating a HWH Temperature Pressure Relief valve in an adjacent shower poses a safety concern

    Photo 65  
    Termination of HWH TPR drain into adjacent shower

    60) Substandard wiring was found for the water heater's power supply. Exposed non-metallic sheathed (Romex) wiring is used and is subject to damage. Both the insulation and conductors can be damaged by repeated movement or contact with objects such as stored items. This is a safety hazard for both fire and shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typically, flexible conduit with bushings is used in this application.
    61) The hot water temperature is greater than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of scalding. The thermostat should be adjusted so the water temperature doesn't exceed 120 degrees. For more information on scalding dangers, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5098.html

    Photo 12  
    HWH temp set to 140 instead of recommended 120 degrees F
     

    62) The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    63) Corrosion was found in one or more areas on the water heater. Evidence of a leaking heater element. A qualified plumbing contractor should evaluate and replace or repair water heater if necessary.

    Photo 7  
    Upper HWH element appears to have a leak

    Photo 9  
    Bottom HWH element appears to have some leakage

    64) Corrosion was found in one or more areas on the water heater, and water stains were found below. The water heater may be failing. A qualified plumbing contractor should evaluate and replace water heater if necessary.
    65) Corrosion was found on fittings and/or water supply lines for the water heater. Leaks may exist. A qualified plumbing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 13  
    TPR pipe disconnected
     

    66)   Evidence of leaking valves/fittings as there is mineral buildup . Recommend having connections repaied/replaced by qualified contractor.

    Photo 10  
    Evidence of valve of fitting connection leakage

    Photo 13  
    TPR pipe disconnected
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 15 Yrs
    Primary heating system energy source: Electric
    Primary heat system type: Forced air, Heat pump
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Split system, Heat pump
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts, Flexible ducts
    Manufacturer: Trane
    Model: GSC13036de-zp
    Filter location: In return air duct above furnace
    Last service date: unknown
    67) The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    68) The estimated useful life for most heat pumps is 15 to 20 years. This heat pump appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    69) One or more air supply ducts are broken or disconnected. Increased moisture levels in unconditioned spaces and higher energy costs may result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary.

    Photo 38  
    Disconnected supply air supply duct

    Photo 39  
    another view of disconnection at tee

    70) Insulation on one or more heating/cooling ducts in unconditioned spaces is damaged and/or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace insulation and/or ducts as necessary and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 40  
    Duct insulation starting to unwrap itself
     

    71) Supply air from the air conditioning system was not cool enough. It should be 14 to 20 degrees Fahrenheit cooler than at the return duct(s), or current room temperature. This may be caused by refrigerant loss, dirty coils, a failing compressor, an over sized fan, or a deficient return air system. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    72) Insulation for the outside condensing unit's refrigerant lines is damaged, deteriorated and/or missing in one or more areas. This may result in reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should replace insulation as necessary.

    Photo 42  
    Suction line missing insulation at air handler

    Photo 44  
    Insulation joint of suction line has come apart exposing pipe

    73) The condenser's liquid line has a sharp kink and could raise head pressure above normal. Compressor is drawing 13.9 amps. Manufacturer's Run Load Amperage is only 13.0. Ambient temperature is only 78 degrees F. Recommend evaluation by licensed contractor.

    Photo 41  
    Severe kink in condenser liquid line
     

    74) The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. This servicing should be performed annually in the future.
    75) The cooling fins on the air handler's evaporator coils are dirty. This may result in reduced efficiency and higher energy costs. Some sources claim that energy efficiency is degraded by about five percent each year as the coils get dirtier due to accumulated dust and grime. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should clean the evaporator coils as necessary.

    Photo 34  
    Evaporator coil fins are dirty

    Photo 46  
    View of filthy coil using mirror before removing panel

    76) The cooling fins on the outdoor condensing unit's evaporator coils are dirty. This may result in reduced efficiency and higher energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should clean the evaporator coils as necessary.
    77) Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.

    Photo 35  
    Plugged up filter

    Photo 43  
    view of previous filter

    78)   Thermostat wiring by condenser has been damaged possibly by a weed wacker and a substandard repair was made. Recommend proper repair by a licensed a/c mechanic.

    Photo 45  
    Damaged thermostat wiring at condenser
     
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): 60psi
    Location of main water shut-off valve: Crawlspace and water heater
    Location of main water meter: at street left of driveway
    Location of main fuel shut-off: N/A
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Galvanized steel
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Plastic
    Drain pipe material: Plastic
    Waste pipe material: Plastic
    79) The clothes dryer exhaust duct is kinked, crushed and/or damaged. Air flow is restricted as a result. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. The exhaust duct should be replaced or repaired, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html

    Photo 101  
     

    80) Copper water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:

  • Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than six hours.
  • Install appropriate filters at points of use.
  • Use only cold water for cooking and drinking. Hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water.
  • Use bottled or distilled water.
  • Treat well water to make it less corrosive.
  • Have a qualified plumbing contractor replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components as necessary.

    For more information visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html
    http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html
    81) The clothes dryer exhaust duct is broken or disconnected in one or more places. Clothes dryers produce large amounts of moisture which should not enter structure interiors. Damage to building components may result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html

    82) Drainpipe in crawlspace has a joint that is connected with gray duct tape. This is not a proper connection. Recommend having qualified plumber repair connection.

    Photo 75  
     

    83) Washer hot water valve is leaking. Refer to licensed plumbing contractor.

    Photo 98  
     

    84) Flow indicator moves slowly with all water vlaves turned off. This indicates a leak. Have evaluated by a qualified plumbing contractor.

    Photo 14  
    Movement on flow indicator with all inside valves turned off. Probable leak.
     

    85)   Guest bath toilet tank has seal leak. Water is dripping down to the valve and corrosion has begun. Recommend repair or replace by qualified contractor.
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Masonry
    Chimney type: Masonry
    86) One or more chimney flues do not have a rainproof cover installed. They prevent the following:

  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install rainproof cover(s) where missing.

    Photo 66  
    Recommend rain cap. Screen can clog with ash causing potential ventilation problem
     

    87) Unfinished drain on bath sink.
     
    Crawl space Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Pier or support post material: Concrete, Masonry
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    Vapor barrier present: No
    88) One or more sections of wiring that weren't terminated were found. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, cutting the wire to length and terminating the wire with wire nuts in a securely anchored, covered, properly sized junction box.
    89) Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.
    90) No vapor barrier is installed. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should install a vapor barrier. Standard building practices require the following:

  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

    Better building practices require that:

  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.
    91) No insulation under floor in crawl space in some areas. Recommend that a qualified contractor install R19 or better (6" thick fiberglass batt) insulation below floor where missing for energy efficiency.
    92)   Exposed wiring in crawlspace that is energized "Live" and can cause electrical shock resulting in injury or death. Have repaired by licensed electrical contator ASAP.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    93) The sink sprayer at the kitchen sink is inoperable or defective. It should be replaced, and by a qualified plumber if necessary.
    94) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.
    95) Water stains and/or minor water damage was found in the shelving or cabinet components below the sink. The client(s) should evaluate and consider having repairs made.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    96) One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.

    Photo 53  
    Ungrounded receptacle and non-GFCI nor on a GFCI circuit
     

    97) One or more sink drains have substandard repairs, such as tape, sealant and/or non-standard components. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 8  
    Not a proper drain connection
     

    98) Tile and/or grout around one or more bathtubs is damaged or deteriorated. For example, deteriorated or missing grout, cracked, missing or loose tiles, etc. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair tile and/or grout as necessary.

    Photo 20  
    Damaged guest bath shower tiles
     

    99) One or more sink stopper mechanisms are missing, or need adjustment or repair. Stopper mechanisms should be installed where missing and/or repairs should be made so sink stoppers open and close easily.

    Photo 6  
    Probable clogged drain. Missing drainstop.
     

    100) One or more sinks are clogged or drain slowly. Drain(s) should be cleared as necessary, and by a qualified plumber if necessary.

    Photo 6  
    Probable clogged drain. Missing drainstop.
     

    101) One or more sink drains use flexible drain pipe. This type of drain pipe is more likely to clog than smooth wall pipe. Recommend having a qualified plumber replace this pipe with standard plumbing components (smooth wall pipe) to prevent clogged drains.

    Photo 8  
    Not a proper drain connection
     

    102) Half bath sink drain is not installed. Refer to qualified plumbing contractor.

    Photo 97  
     

    103) Leaking toilet tank seal in master bathroom that leaks down to valve and drips on floor. refer to plumber.

    Photo 96  
     

    104) Grout is missing or deteriorated along the base of master shower where flooring meets the shower. It should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to the floor structure.

    The shower floor shows evidence of "Ponding" (holding water) due to a low area. Have evaluated by qualified tile contractor.

    Photo 30  
    Master shower floor ponds water
     

    105)   Guest bathroom toilet shows evidence of a leak fron tank running down supply pipe to valve. Recommend repair by
    Licensed plumber.

    106)   Converted half bath does not have sink drain installed yet and supply valves show sign of leakage. Have repaird by qualified plumbing contractor.
    107)   Master and guest bathroom's vents terminate in attic. Have evaluated by a licensed HVAC mechanic.

    Photo 36  
    Guest bath vent terminates in attic

    Photo 37  
    Master bath vent terminates in attic
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    108) One or more smoke alarms are damaged or missing from their mounting brackets, and an insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Damaged and/or missing smoke alarms should be replaced as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    109) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
    110) Cover plate(s) are broken at one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be replaced where necessary.
    111) Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    112) Stains and elevated levels of moisture were found in one or more ceiling areas. The stain(s) appear to be due to roof leaks. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 16  
    Moist stain on ceiling near register
     

    113) The doorbell button is loose or damaged. It should be repaired or replaced as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
    114) Trim is damaged and/or deteriorated/decayed on baseboaed in den. Recommend having a qualified contractor replace or repair trim as necessary.

    Photo 29  
    Small decay area on den baseboard
     

    115) Minor cracks were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
     

    Photo 18  
    Possibly a condensation stain on ceiling at register. Refer to HVAC contractor for determination.

    Photo 24  
    Closet shelf support bracket has pulled away from drywall

    Photo 28  
    No moisture indication on paneling stains in den

    Photo 32  
    Delamination occurring on bar counter

    Photo 33  
    Guest bath ceiling stain shows no indication of moisture at this time

    Photo 99  
    Ceiling stain showed no moisture reading at this time

    Photo 100  
    Drywall missing behind baseboard by guest bath vanity.
     

     
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