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CURTIS C HOME INSPECTION SERVICE, LLC

Website: http://www.curtischomeinspections.com
Email: curtiscservices@yahoo.com
Phone: (360) 296-4020
FAX: (360) 380-1523
2246 Thornton Street 
Ferndale, WA 98248
Inspector: Curtis C Brown
WSDA Structural Pest Inspection License # 76712
interNACHI member #08032905

  

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Sample Report #2
Property address: XXX XXXX Lane
Mount Vernon ,WA
98XXX
Inspection date: Thursday, April 10, 2008
This report published on 5/22/2009 4:31:14 PM PDT

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This report is the exclusive property of CURTIS C HOME INSPECTION SERVICE L L C and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major defectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor defectCorrection only involves a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
ServiceableItem or component is in serviceable condition 
CommentFor your information 

Structural Pest Inspection Concerns
Items of concern relating to the structural pest inspection are shown as follows:
WDO/WDI InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
WDO/WDI DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
WDO/WDI Conducive
conditions
Conditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms
Roof
Crawl space
 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: XXXXXXX
Structures inspected: Single famley Home
Age of building: 1952
Property owner's name: XXXX XXXXX
Time started: 10:30AM
Time finished: 1:30 PM
Present during inspection: Property owner
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Cloudy
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Damp
Main entrance faces: West
Foundation type: Crawlspace, Slab on grade
The following items are excluded from this inspection: Private sewage disposal system, Outbuildings, Two Bedrooms at the East end and 1/4 Bath
1)   Note that the Water Shut-off is at the meter by the driveway. The shut-off in the North-West corner of the Crawl Space is likely to be for the boiler above.
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Wood clapboard, Vertical wood
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete aggregate
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete aggregate
Exterior door material: Solid core wood, Sliding glass, Glass panel
2) One or more wooden deck support posts are in contact with soil, and are rotten. And a large number of deck boards are rotten. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Recommend that all rotting wood from the deck and also the roof structure above be removed and replaced with new material.Standard building practices require that there be at least 6" of space between any wood and the soil below, even if the wood is treated. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as replacing rotten posts, or trimming rotten post bases and installing concrete and metal post bases. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. Otherwise recommend installing borate based Impel rods to prevent rot.

Photo 5  

Photo 18  

3)   There is a trip hazard found in sidewalk adjacent to the driveway due to cracks, settlement and/or heaving. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sidewalk and/or patio sections as necessary to eliminate trip hazards.

Photo 2  
 

4) Perimeter pavement slopes towards structure at the sidewalk and small pad near the craw space access. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms. Recommend having a qualified contractor make repairs as necessary so perimeter pavement slopes down and away from the structure.
5) Rot was found at the North East corner fascia boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.
6) One or more gutters are poorly sloped so that significant amounts of water accumulate in them rather than draining through the downspouts. This can cause gutters to overflow, especially when organic debris such as leaves or needles have accumulated in them. At the time of the inspection the most noted areas were at the East side and over the rain barrel. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as correcting the slope in gutters or installing additional downspouts and extensions if necessary.

Photo 9  
 

7)   The East and West outside faucets leaks from the valve stem when turned on . A handy homeowner or A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

Photo 15  
 

8) The downspout at the North West corner should extend further from the foundation. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.

Photo 3  
 

9) Two crawl space vent screens at the South end are blocked by removable panels. This restricts ventilation in the crawl space and may result in increased levels of moisture inside. Materials or items blocking vents should be removed.
10) Soffits are unvented. This can result in moisture accumulation in roof cavities and rot. A qualified contractor should install screened vents in soffits where missing and as per standard building practices.
11) Flashing is missing from above the deck ledger boards. This can cause moisture to accumulate between the ledger board(s) and the structure. Rot may result in this area and cause the ledger board fasteners to fail. The deck may separate from the structure in this event and poses a significant safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install flashing above ledger board(s) where necessary. For more information on installing deck ledger boards visit: http://www.hometime.com/Howto/projects/decks/deck_4.htm

And for more information on building safe decks in general, visit: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow/exteriors/article/0,16417,212625,00.html

12)   The outside faucets are missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/BODY_AE079

13) The two trees at the South West corner of the house are close to the roof and gutter systems and should be pruned and maintained. Damage to the roof may result, especially during high winds. Vegetation can also act as a conduit for wood destroying insects. Vegetation should be pruned back and/or removed as necessary to prevent damage and infestation by wood destroying insects. These trees are not a big concern at this time, But may be later in the growing season. The tree at the north end should also be monitored.

Photo 13  

Photo 16  

14) Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. Recommend that this be maintained on A regular basis. For more information on caulking, visit The Ins and Outs of Caulking.
15)   The electric receptacle in the soffit by the back door appears to have no power. If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
16)   Stains were found in one or more areas on soffit boards, but no elevated moisture levels were found and the wood appears to be in good condition. Based on the appearance of the roof, these stains may be from past leaks. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future. If moisture is observed, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
17)   The home has sings of uniform settlement and one or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.

    Photo 1  
    settlement cracks at stone veneer is presumed to be superficial,or a cosmetic condition. The home owner may consider having the grout repaired by a qualified mason.
     

    18)   Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.
     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams
    Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt, Mineral wool loose fill
    Insulation depth: Undeturmend
    Insulation estimated R value: Undeturmend
    19)   Wire splices are exposed due to not being contained in a covered junction box. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock and fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install securely mounted junction boxes with cover plates where needed to contain wiring splices.

    Photo 11  
    Note; This photo also shows some of the debris and substandard insulation as well as some loose wiring.
     

    20)   Some wiring is loose, unsupported, or inadequately supported. Standard building practices require non-metallic sheathed wiring to be trimmed to length, attached to runners or to solid backing with fasteners at intervals of 4-1/2 ft. or less. Fasteners should be installed within 12 inches of all enclosures. A qualified, licensed electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, trim wire to length and/or install staples as needed.
    21)   Evidence of "light to moderate" rodent infestation was found in one or more areas. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines this as less than 20 feces per square foot. Rodent infestation may be a safety hazard due to the risk of contracting Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). HPS is a rare (only 20-50 cases per year in the United states) but deadly (40% mortality rate) disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. For example, from sweeping up rodent droppings.

    Recommend following guidelines in the CDC's Clean Up, Trap Up, Seal Up article for eradicating rodents, cleaning up their waste and nesting materials, and preventing future infestations. While Hantavirus is believed to survive less than one week in droppings and urine, specific precautions should be taken during clean up. The client(s) may wish to consult with a qualified, licensed pest control operator for eliminating the infestation. A qualified licensed abatement contractor or industrial hygienist could be contacted for clean up. If the infestation was minimal, clean up of rodent waste and nesting materials in non-living spaces (crawl spaces and attics) may not be necessary, or may be performed for aesthetic reasons only (odor and appearance).

    22) Both exhaust fans [kitchen and bathroom] have no duct and terminate in the attic. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. A qualified contractor should install ducts and vent caps as necessary and as per standard building practices so exhaust air is vented outside. Better building practices call for R8 rated insulation on these ducts.
    23)   The ceiling insulation's R rating is significantly less than what's recommended for this area. Recommend having a qualified contractor install additional insulation as per standard building practices for better energy efficiency.
    24)   Ceiling insulation is missing in some areas. Recommend installing insulation where missing for better energy efficiency.
    25)   No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.
    26)   No weatherstrip is installed around the attic access hatch. Weatherstrip should be installed around the hatch to prevent heated interior air from entering attic.
    27)   Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may be caused by a past leak. The client should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, particularly around the chimney to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified roofing contractor and/or a chimney contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    28)   There is a large amount of debris in the attic. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects. Recommend that all debris be removed.
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of sub panels: Studio outbuilding
    Location of main disconnect: Top bank of breakers in main service panel (split bus)
    Service entrance conductor material: Copper
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
    Branch circuit wiring type: Copper
    Smoke detectors present: Present but Disconected
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: Nov 1993
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): 50
    Manufacturer: State
    Model: PRV 50 NBRTO F
    Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 110
    29)   No drain line is installed for the temperature-pressure relief valve. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified plumber should install a drain line as per standard building practices. For example, extending to 6 inches from the floor, or routed so as to drain outside.
    30)   The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    31) A water heater is installed in a finished living space and has no catch pan and drain installed. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a catch pan and drain to prevent water damage to finished interior spaces if/when the water heater develops a leak or is drained.
     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Radiant
    Distribution system: Metal pipe
    Manufacturer: Burnham
    Estimated age: 1989
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Radiant, Hot water
    Distribution system: Metal pipe
    Model: P-203A WNI
    Last service date: Undeturmened
    32)   The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
    33)   The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
    34)   The estimated useful life for most forced air furnaces is 15 to 20 years. This furnace appears to be at this age or older and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    35)   No drip leg is installed on the boiler gas supply line. Drip legs are intended to trap oil, scale, water condensation and/or debris from the gas supply lines before they reach and damage the boiler components. A qualified contractor should install a drip leg as per standard building practices.
    36)     No drain line is installed for the temperature-pressure relief valve. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of scalding if someone is standing next to the water heater when the valve opens. A qualified plumber should install a drain line as per standard building practices. For example, extending to 6 inches from the floor, or routed so as to drain outside.

    Photo 17  
    Note; This also occurs at the Water Heater.
     
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): 80 psi
    Location of main water shut-off valve: At the meter
    Location of main water meter: South side of driveway
    Location of main fuel shut-off: At the meter
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Not visible
    Supply pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Galvanized steel
    Drain pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
    Waste pipe material: Plastic, Cast iron
    37)   No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection device at the receptacle behind washer. A qualified electrician should install a GFCI to reduce the danger of electric shock. The existing receptacle has a open ground.

    Photo 20  
    The light on this tester indicates an open ground
     

    38)   The clothes dryer is equipped with a foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information on dryer safety issues, see http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html
    39)   Some, most, or all of the water supply pipes in this structure are made of galvanized steel. Based on the age of this structure, these pipes may be nearing or may have exceeded their estimated useful life of 40 to 60 years. Internal corrosion and rust can reduce the inside diameter of these pipes over time, resulting in reduced flow and eventually, leaks. The inspector performed a "functional flow test" during the inspection where multiple fixtures were run simultaneously, and found the flow to be adequate. For example, the shower flow didn't decrease substantially when the toilet was flushed. Despite this, and because of their apparent age, these pipes may need replacing at any time.
    40) The washing machine is installed in a finished living space and has no catch pan or drain installed. These are not commonly installed, but they are recommended to prevent water damage to finished interior spaces if or when the washing machine leaks, overflows or is drained. Recommend having a qualified contractor install both a catch pan and drain.
    41) The laundry sink is not anchored to the wall or floor in a secure manner and the drain leaks. A qualified contractor or a handy homeowner should repair the drain and securely anchor the sink to the wall and/or floor to prevent damage to and leaks in the water supply and/or drain pipes due to the sink being moved.
    42) Stains were found in one or more sections of drain and/or waste pipes. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future, and if leaks are found, have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair as necessary. Alternatively, the client(s) may wish to have a qualified plumber evaluate now and repair if necessary.
    43)   Neither the clothes washer nor dryer were operated or evaluated. They are excluded from this inspection.
    44)   The water supply pressure is 78 to 80 psi. Pressures above 80 psi may void warranties for some appliances such as water heaters or washing machines. Flexible supply lines to washing machines are more likely to burst with higher pressures. Typically the pressure cannot be regulated at the water meter. Recommend having a qualified plumber evaluate and make modifications to reduce the pressure below 80 psi. Installing a pressure reducing valve on the main service pipe is a common solution to this problem. If one exists, then it should be adjusted for lower pressures.
     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Masonry
    Woodstove type: Metal insert
    Chimney type: Masonry
    45)   The inspector was unable to determine if the woodstove and flue are installed safely, and in accordance with the manufacturers' specifications. The manufacturer's information label(s) were illegible and/or missing. Recommend having a qualified stove and/or chimney service contractor evaluate to determine if the woodstove and flue are in installed in accordance with the manufacturers' specifications, and make repairs and/or modifications if necessary.
    46)   The chimney flue openings do not have a screen installed. Screens prevent the following:

  • Fire hazard from wood fire sparks and embers exiting flues
  • Wildlife (birds, rodents, raccoons, etc.) entering flues

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install screening where missing. Screens should have holes 1/4 inch or larger.
    47)   The masonry chimney crown is deteriorated (cracked or broken) and needs repairs or replacement. The crown is meant to keep water off of the chimney structure. The chimney can be damaged by wet masonry going through freeze-thaw cycles. A properly constructed chimney crown should:

  • Be constructed using either pre-cast concrete slabs, cast-in-place steel reinforced concrete, solid stone, or metal
  • Be sloped down from the flue a minimum of 3 inches of fall per foot of run
  • Extend a minimum of 2-1/2 inches beyond the face of the chimney on all sides
  • Not directly contact the flue liner (if installed), and this gap should be filled with flexible caulk
  • Have flashing installed between the bottom of the crown and the top of the brick chimney

    A qualified chimney service contractor or mason should evaluate and repair or replace the crown as necessary.

    Photo 7  
    Blue arrows indicates no rainproof covers and yellow arrow shows an example of crown deterioration.
     

    48)   The chimney flues do not have a rainproof cover installed. They prevent the following:

  • Rainwater entering flues and mixing with combustion deposits, creating caustic chemicals which can corrode flues
  • Rainwater entering flues and causing damage to terracotta flue tiles from freeze-thaw cycles

    A qualified chimney service contractor should install rainproof cover(s) where missing.

    Photo 7  
    Blue arrows indicates no rainproof covers and yellow arrow shows an example of crown deterioration.
     

    49)   All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    50)   The electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    51)   The range can tip forward, and no anti-tip bracket appears to be installed. This is a safety hazard since the range may tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it, or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free standing ranges since 1985. An anti-tip bracket should be installed to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/remodeling/article/0,1797,HGTV_3659_2017492,00.html
    52) Evidence of a leak was found at water supply lines. The valve was dry at the time of inspection but there is a water stain on the cabinet below. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 4  
    The blue circle and arrow shows past water leak, The red arrow shows no air gag for the dishwasher
     

    53)   The dishwasher drain line is not configured with a "high loop" or "air gap". A high loop is created by routing the drain line up to the bottom surface of the counter top above, and securely fastening it to that surface. It is meant to prevent water from siphoning out of the dishwasher, and to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. Some dishwashers have a built-in high loop where one is not required to be configured in the drain line. The clients should try to determine if a high loop is required for this brand and model of dishwasher (review installation instructions, etc.). If one is required, or it cannot be determined if one is not required, then a qualified contractor should install a high loop as per standard building practices.

    Also, no "air gap" is installed. Air gaps are another device meant to prevent water from the sink drain or food disposal from entering the dishwasher. These are required in some municipalities for new construction and when remodeling. The client(s) should consult with a qualified contractor to determine if an air gap should be installed.

    Photo 4  
    The blue circle and arrow shows past water leak, The red arrow shows no air gag for the dishwasher
     

    54)   No range hood is installed over the range or cook top. Ventilation and/or lighting may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a vented and lighted range hood, with the exhaust fan configured so as to vent outdoors. Note; The fan in the kitchen is not vented and not being used by homeowner
    55)   The enamel coating on the sink is damaged and/or deteriorated. For example, chipped or worn, and/or rust on some exposed steel. However, no leaks were found due to the deterioration. The client(s) should evaluate to determine if the sinks should be replaced.
    56)   The kitchen appliances appear to be near, at, or beyond their intended service life of 10 to 15 years. Recommend budgeting for replacements as necessary.
    57)     The appliances and cabinetry were not inspected for functionality and are excluded from this report.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    58) There is evidence of possible extensive water damage to tub surround. recommend that a qualified contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.
    59)   A open ground, three-pronged electric receptacles was found. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing receptacles or correcting wiring circuits.

    Grounding type receptacles began being required in residential structures during the 1960s. Based on the age of this structure and the presence of 2-pronged receptacles in some areas of this structure, an acceptable repair may be to simply replace the ungrounded 3-pronged receptacles with 2-pronged receptacles. However the following appliances require grounding type receptacles:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. Grounded circuits and receptacles should be installed in locations where such appliances will be used.
    60)   The electric receptacle that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    61) The exhaust fan is not connected to a vent. Moisture may accumulate as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace the fan or make repairs as necessary.
    62) Tile, and grout is damaged and/or deteriorated around "wet" areas with a wood subfloor below. The deterioration may allow water intrusion, and may result in damage to the subfloor. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing broken tiles and deteriorated grout, and resealing grout.
    63) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated at the bathtub. For example, where the tub base meets the floor below, where the tub surround meets the tub, and/or around the base of the tub spout. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water intrusion and damage to wall and floor structures. Due to the condition of the tub tile surround, this should more of a concern to maintain after the proper repairs are done the tub area.
    64)   Recommend cleaning and sealing grout in countertops now and in the future as necessary to prevent staining and to improve waterproofing.
     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    65)   Two-pronged electric receptacles rather than three-pronged, grounded receptacles are installed in one or more interior rooms. They are considered to be unsafe by today's standards and limit the ability to use appliances that require a ground in these rooms. Examples of appliances that require grounded receptacles include:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. A qualified electrician should evaluate and install grounded receptacles as per the client(s)' needs and standard building practices.
    66)   Smoke alarms are present but disabled. This is a safety hazard. A qualified electrician should install smoke alarms as per standard building practices (functioning one exists in hallways leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom, etc.). For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
    67)   The front boor binds in it's jamb and is difficult to open and close. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, adjusting jambs or trimming doors. Due to the deteriorating condition of all entry doors [excluding the slider]. Recommend that they be replaced rather than repaired.
    68)   Wood flooring in one or more areas is worn, damaged and/or cupping. Recommend having a qualified contractor evaluate and refinish wood flooring as necessary.
    69)   The exterior entrance doors are damaged and/or deteriorated and should be repaired or replaced by a qualified contractor.
    70)   The weatherstrip around the exterior entry doors is missing and/or deteriorated. Weatherstrip should be installed where missing and/or replaced where deteriorated, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.
    71)   Stains were found in the ceiling area in the dining room. However, no elevated levels of moisture were found. The stain(s) may be due to past roof and/or plumbing leaks. Recommend monitoring the stained area(s) in the future, especially after heavy or prolonged rain. If elevated moisture is found in the future, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    72)   Minor cracks were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
    73)     The light receptacle in the ceiling by the attic access should have a cover to prevent possible electoral shock.

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    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Traversed
    Roof type: Hipped
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 5 to 10 years
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    74) Moss is accumulating at the North side of the roof. this will damage the composition shingles and leaks may occur as a result. There are Homeowner products available the can deter this growth, consult your local home center for this information or, A qualified roofing contractor should evaluate, remove moss, and make repairs as necessary. Do Not pressure wash.

    Photo 19  
     

    75) Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.

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    Crawl space Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed
    Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Pier or support post material: Wood
    Beam material: Built up wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    Vapor barrier present: Yes
    76)   The wire feed to the outbuilding Sub-Panel is loose, unsupported, or inadequately supported. Standard building practices require non-metallic sheathed wiring to be trimmed to length, attached to runners or to solid backing with fasteners at intervals of 4-1/2 ft. or less. Fasteners should be installed within 12 inches of all enclosures. A qualified, licensed electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary. For example, trim wire to length and/or install staples as needed.
    77)   Evidence of "light to moderate" rodent infestation was found in one or more areas. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines this as less than 20 feces per square foot. Rodent infestation may be a safety hazard due to the risk of contracting Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS). HPS is a rare (only 20-50 cases per year in the United states) but deadly (40% mortality rate) disease transmitted by infected rodents through urine, droppings, or saliva. Humans can contract the disease when they breathe in aerosolized virus. For example, from sweeping up rodent droppings.

    Recommend following guidelines in the CDC's Clean Up, Trap Up, Seal Up article for eradicating rodents, cleaning up their waste and nesting materials, and preventing future infestations. While Hantavirus is believed to survive less than one week in droppings and urine, specific precautions should be taken during clean up. The client(s) may wish to consult with a qualified, licensed pest control operator for eliminating the infestation. A qualified licensed abatement contractor or industrial hygienist could be contacted for clean up. If the infestation was minimal, clean up of rodent waste and nesting materials in non-living spaces (crawl spaces and attics) may not be necessary, or may be performed for aesthetic reasons only (odor and appearance).

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    78) Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in one or more sections of the crawl space. For example, sediment stains on the vapor barrier or foundation, and/or efflorescence on the foundation. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the crawl space. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the crawl space. The crawl space should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in crawl spaces include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter crawl spaces, but if water must be controlled after it enters the crawl space, then typical repairs include installing trenches, gravity drains and/or sump pump(s) in the crawl space.
    79) Two crawl space vent screens are blocked by removable panels. This restricts ventilation in the crawl space [at the South end] and may result in increased levels of moisture inside. Materials or items blocking vents should be removed.
    80) No vapor barrier is installed in some areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified contractor should install a vapor barrier where missing. Standard building practices require the following:

  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

    Better building practices require that:

  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.

    Photo 6  
    The white parts in the dirt is mold.
     

    81) Cellulose-based debris such as wood scraps, form wood, cardboard and/or paper were found in crawl space. All cellulose-based debris should be removed to avoid attracting wood destroying insects.
    82)     The cardboard at the access to the crawlspace is a conducive condition for WDO's [wood destroying insects]. All cellulose-based debris should be removed to avoid attracting wood destroying insects.

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    83)     There has been repairs done to the floor structure at the North East corner under the toilet were rot has occurred. Some of the damaged material has been left and new material applied to this area. This is a conducive condition for WDO's [Wood destroying organisms and insects]. Recommend that all damaged material be removed by a qualified contractor.

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    Curtis C Brown [360]296-4020 curtiscservices@yahoo.com