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CURTIS C HOME INSPECTION SERVICE, LLC

Website: http://www.curtischomeinspections.com
Email: curtiscservices@yahoo.com
Phone: (360) 296-4020
FAX: (360) 380-1523
2246 Thornton Street 
Ferndale, WA 98248
Inspector: Curtis C Brown
WSDA Structural Pest Inspection License # 76712
interNACHI member #08032905

  

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Sample Report
Property address: XXXX East XXXX Street
Mount Vernon, WA
98XXX
Inspection date: Monday, July 14, 2008
This report published on 5/22/2009 4:32:29 PM PDT

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CURTIS C HOME INSPECTION SERVICES, LLC
Curtis C Brown, Owner
Certified Home Inspector
Washington State Structural Pest Inspector
License #76712

Thank you for using CURTIS C HOME INSPECTION SERVICES, LLC for your Home inspection. Buying a home is probably the most expensive purchase you will ever make. I understand how important your home inspection is to you and your family. And your business is very important to me and my family. If there is anyway I can help you after your home inspection, please do not hesitate to contact Curtis at the phone number or email provided on this report. If you find this report useful and informative please refer CURTIS C HOME INSPECTION SERVICES, LLC to your friends, your realtor and anyone you believe could benefit from my services. CURTIS C HOME INSPECTION SERVICES, LLC not only performs inspections for purchasers, but also for people planning to sell a home who wish to estimate the amount of work that needs to be completed before listing the house.

A home inspection is a visual, and not an exhaustive or invasive, inspection of a home by a trained and impartial inspector. The inspector role in a home inspection is to find issues and deficiencies in the home and property. As a result, this report may seem negative in content. Unfortunately, the best features of a home may go unmentioned in this report. Please read the full report, not just the summary.There is very valuable information included within the full report text.

An inspector is looking for significant issues. Pointing out primarily cosmetic details or inexpensive and simple repairs is not the goal of this home inspection. Any minor deficiencies listed in an inspection report are at the discretion of the home inspector. Due to the inherent nature of construction, the inspector cannot see through or into interior walls or siding, through or into concrete slabs or floors, roofs and ceilings. Nor can an inspector see into drains, down into toilet/floor/sink connections, into service or sewer pipes, into ducting or vents. Only the normal operating control will be tested on any appliance. No appliances, mechanical or electrical devices, or parts of the structure, will be dis-assembled during the home inspection (with two exceptions (1) the cover will be removed from the electric panel when possible; (2) cover panels will be removed from the furnace when possible). It is possible that some defects are concealed, weather related, intermittent or slow developing, so they may not be active or visible at the time of the inspection. The home inspector makes every effort to perform a thorough inspection, within the limitations specified, but makes no warranties about the home other than reporting on the conditions visible and apparent at the time of inspection. Conditions in a home can, and will, change from day to day.

CURTIS C HOME INSPECTION SERVICES, LLC adheres to the standards of the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors, an organization that encourages high ethical standards and professionalism in the home inspection industry.
To read the standards please visit:
http://www.nachi.org/sop.htm

A home inspection is a common sense approach to evaluating visual deficiencies found at a home. your inspector is not inspecting based on current or past "codes". Recommendations made on the home inspection report are not always "mandatory" repairs. A code inspection would, by definition, fail to point out a number of deficiencies just as long as the home met the various applicable "codes". This type of "code" inspection might leave out a number of maintenance issues that are addressed in a home inspection. Also it is unfair, except with critical safety issues, to expect a home built prior to the "code" to meet the most recent codes.


This report includes an inspection for wood destroying organisms (WDO'S). More detailed information on this topic and a suggestion as to how to more effectively use Form 17, the Real Property Transfer Disclosure Statement, is provided under the General Information section in this report. By law the State of Washington mandates that I inspect for, and report on, WDO infestations or conditions that are conducive to attracting WDO's.

Every CURTIS C HOME INSPECTION report includes photos and descriptions detailing the locations of areas of concern as noted by the inspector. If during this inspection wood destroying organisms or conditions conducive to wood destroying organisms were found, you should know: WAC 16-228-2045 REQUIRES THAT A DIAGRAM BE PREPARED FOR WDO INSPECTION REPORTS. A COPY IS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST.

SUMMARY: NEAR THE TOP OF THE REPORT YOU MAY CLICK ON A "SUMMARY". THIS WILL SHOW ONLY THE MOST SIGNIFICANT ISSUES WHICH ARE TAKEN FROM THE MAIN REPORT BASED ON PRIORITY. THE SUMMARY LEAVES CONCERNS NUMBERED AS THEY ARE IN THE FULL REPORT, SO THEY ARE EASY TO LOCATE IN THE BODY OF THE REPORT. FOR THIS REASON, THE SUMMARY WILL PROBABLY NOT BE SEQUENTIALLY NUMBERED.

This report is the exclusive property of CURTIS C HOME INSPECTION SERVICES, LLC and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor defectCorrection only involves a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Structural Pest Inspection Concerns
Items of concern relating to the structural pest inspection are shown as follows:
WDO/WDI InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
WDO/WDI DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
WDO/WDI Conducive
conditions
Conditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General Information
Grounds
Exterior / Foundation
Roof / Attic
Electric
Plumbing / Fuel Systems
Water Heater
Heating
Fireplaces / Stoves / Chimneys
Kitchen
Bathrooms / Laundry / Sinks
Interior Rooms / Areas
Structural Pest Findings
Exterior
 
General Information Return to table of contents
Inspector: Curtis C Brown
Inspection fee: None
Type of building: Single family
Main entrance faces: North
Occupied: Yes
Property owner's name: XXXXX XXXXXX
Source for additions and modifications: Property owner
Report number: XXXXXX
Time started: 10:30 AM
Time finished: 1:30 PM
Inspector: Curtis C Brown
Present during inspection: Client, Property owner
Client present for discussion at end of inspection: Yes
Weather conditions: Clear
Temperature: Warm,68 F
Ground condition: Dry
Type of building: Single family
Age of building(s): 1925
Source for building age: Client, Property owner
Main entrance faces: North
Occupied: Yes
Property owner's name: Client
Additions and modifications: Updated 1972
Remodel/Addition 2006

Source for additions and modifications: Client, Property owner
1)   Some wall and floor surfaces were obscured by furniture, stored items and couldn't be fully evaluated. These areas are minimal,but some electrical receptacles were not tested.
 
Grounds Return to table of contents
Condition of fences and gates: Appeared serviceable. Recemend that the gate latch be made assessable from the back yard
Fence and gate material: Wood
Condition of retaining walls: although the retaining wall is excluded from this report,it is recommended the rock work at the north end of the property be evaluated and monitored annually.
Retaining wall material: Rock
Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: water features and related equipment; recreation or leisure equipment; landscape lighting; areas below exterior structures with less than three feet of vertical clearance; irrigation systems; invisible fencing. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not test or determine the adequacy of drainage systems for grounds, walkways, below-grade stairs and roof downspouts. The inspector does not provide an evaluation of geological conditions and/or site stability, compliance of fencing with municipal requirements, or determination that deck, balcony and/or stair membranes are watertight.
Exterior stair material: Wood and stone
2)   One or more trip hazards were found in sidewalk sections due to settlement, heaving and/or deterioration. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace sections as necessary to eliminate trip hazards.

Photo 2  
Trip hazard.
 

3) Flashing was missing from above both deck ledger boards. This can cause moisture to accumulate between the ledger board(s) and the building. Rot may result in this area and cause the ledger board fasteners to fail. The deck may separate from the building in this event and poses a significant safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install flashing above ledger board(s) where necessary. For more information on installing deck ledger boards visit:
http://www.hometime.com/Howto/projects/decks/deck_4.htm

And for more information on building safe decks in general, visit: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow/exteriors/article/0,16417,212625,00.html

4)   The ledger boards at both decks were nailed to the building rather than being attached by adequate fasteners. This poses a significant safety hazard since the ledger board(s) may separate from the building, causing the deck(s) to collapse. A qualified contractor should install lag screws or bolts as per standard building practices to securely attach the ledger board(s) to the building. For more information on installing deck ledger boards visit: http://www.hometime.com/Howto/projects/decks/deck_4.htm

And for more information on building safe decks in general, visit: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow/exteriors/article/0,16417,212625,00.html

Photo 10  
Missing lag bolts

Photo 17  
Misseng lag bolts

5) Soil was in contact with or too close to wooden support posts, stairs, at all three entrances. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require the following clearances to soil below:

  • 12 inches between beams and the soil below
  • 18 inches between joists and the soil below
  • 6 inches between support post bases and the soil below
  • Not in contact with any wood

    Soil should be graded and/or removed to maintain these clearances. If this is not practical, then installing borate based Impel rods may help to prevent infestation and damage. For more information, visit:
    http://www.ewoodcare.com/products/borates_preserve/impel_rods.html

    Photo 3  
    wood to earth contact (front).

    Photo 8  
    Wood to earth contact (back).

    Photo 33  
    Wood to earth contact (side).
     

    6)   Wooden deck, porch and/or balcony surfaces, railings should be cleaned and sealed by a qualified person.
     
    Exterior / Foundation Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: below-grade foundation walls and footings, or those obscured by vegetation or building components; exterior building surfaces or components obscured by vegetation, stored items or debris. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Some amount of cracking is normal in concrete slabs and foundation walls due to shrinkage and drying. Note that the inspector does not determination the adequacy of sump pumps, seismic reinforcement, nor determine if support posts, columns, beams, joists, studs, trusses, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing.
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Wall covering: Wood sheathing
    Condition of foundation and footings: Appeared serviceable
    Foundation type: Unfinished basement, Crawlspace
    Foundation material: Brick And concrete renforeced foam.
    Footing material: Not determined
    Anchor bolts for seismic reinforcement: None visible, Not determined
    Pier or support post material: Wood
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure: Solid wood joists
    Crawl space inspection method: Traversed
    Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Ventilation: Appears serviceable, Substandard
    Vapor barrier present: Yes
    7) Paper facing on batt insulation in the crawl space, basement, attic was exposed. The paper facing is flammable, and poses a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Also, the paper facing typically acts as a vapor barrier, and if located away from the interior surfaces, can trap moisture from condensation in the cavity between the paper facing and the interior spaces. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects. The inspector was unable to evaluate the structure obscured by the insulation. A qualified person should reinstall or replace the insulation as per standard building practices and as per the manufacturer's instructions. Also one of the pictures below notes gaps in the siding: see "missing caulking " concern in this section.

    Photo 26  
    Insulation missing( yellow arrow) and gaps in siding(blue arrow).

    Photo 29  

    8) Rot damage was found at north west gable end. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced.

    Photo 11  
    Rot at gable end.
     

    9) The vapor barrier in the crawl space was missing, substandard in some areas. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to the likelihood of water evaporating into the structure from the soil. A qualified person should evaluate and replace or repair sections as necessary. Standard building practices require the following:

  • The soil below the vapor barrier should be smooth and free from sharp objects.
  • Seams should overlap a minimum of 12 inches.
  • The vapor barrier should lap up onto the foundation side walls.

    Better building practices require that:

  • Seams and protrusions should be sealed with a pressure sensitive tape.
  • The vapor barrier should be caulked and attached tightly to the foundation side walls. For example, with furring strips and masonry nails.

    Photo 30  
    exposed earth.

    Photo 37  
    Debris in crawl space (yellow arrow). missing vapor barrier (blue arrow).

    10) Ventilation for the crawl space was substandard. This may result in high levels of moisture in the crawl space and can be a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Standard building practices require one square foot of vent area for 150 to 200 square feet of crawl space. Vents should be evenly distributed and within a few feet of corners to promote air circulation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install vents as per standard building practices. NOTE: This condition is at the north end of the structure. The addition at the south has sufficient ventilation.
    11) Standing water was found in one or more sections of the basement. Accumulated water is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms and should not be present in the basement. A qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary. Typical repairs for preventing water from accumulating in basements include:

  • Repairing, installing or improving rain run-off systems (gutters, downspouts and extensions or drain lines)
  • Improving perimeter grading
  • Repairing, installing or improving underground footing and/or curtain drains

    Ideally, water should not enter basements, but if water must be controlled after it enters the basement, then typical repairs include installing a sump pump.

    Photo 38  
    Standing water in basement.
     

    12)   Floors in one or more areas were not level. Significant repairs may be needed to make floors level, such as repairs to the foundation.This occurs at the north west part of the house. This is common for a house of this age. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary or desired.
    13) Caulk was missing, deteriorated in some areas. For example, around windows, at siding butt joints, at siding-trim junctions, at wall penetrations, and a variety of small holes (see example below). A qualified person should repair or replace as necessary. For more information, visit:
    http://www.reporthost.com/_docs/FPL_Caulking_Ins_Outs.pdf

    Photo 5  
    Hole in siding.

    Photo 34  
    exposed holes.

    Photo 35  
    Missing caulking.
     

    14)   Cellulose material such as scrap wood, form wood was found in the crawl space. All cellulose-based debris or stored items should be removed to avoid attracting wood destroying insects.

    Photo 28  
    Wood to earth contact (blue arrow)and debris(yellow arrow).

    Photo 36  
    Debris in crawl space (yellow arrow). missing vapor barrier (blue arrow).

    15)   Based on its appearance and/or age, the foundation, or sections of it may not be reinforced. Foundations without modern reinforcement such as "rebar" are more prone to failure during a seismic event. Typically, concrete foundations built prior to the 1930s, are unreinforced. Recommend consulting with a qualified engineer to determine if the foundation should be replaced or modified.
    16)   Stains were found in one or more areas on soffit boards in the attic and visible floor structure, but no elevated moisture levels were found and the wood appears to be in good condition. Based on the appearance of the roof, these stains may be from past leaks. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future. If moisture is observed, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    17)   Some concrete slab floor sections were obscured by stored items, sleeper floor and couldn't be fully evaluated.
     
    Roof / Attic Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items or areas are not included in this inspection: areas that could not be traversed or viewed clearly due to lack of access; areas and components obscured by insulation; solar roofing components; any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determination if rafters, trusses, joists, beams, etc. are of adequate size, spanning or spacing. The inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining roof surface life, does not determine that the roof has absolutely no leaks at the time of the inspection, and does not determine that the roof won't leak in the future. Only active leaks and evidence of past leaks observed during the inspection are reported on as part of this inspection. To absolutely determine than no leaks exist, complete access to all roof structure areas must be available during a wide variety of weather conditions, including prolonged heavy rain, high wind from varying directions, heavy accumulations of snow and/or ice, and melting snow and ice.
    Condition of roof structure: Appeared serviceable
    Roof type: Gable
    Age of roof surface(s): Two years +
    Source for building age: Client, Property owner
    Roof inspection method: Partially traversed, Viewed from eaves on ladder, Viewed from ground with binoculars
    Roof surface material: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Apparent number of layers of roof surface material: One
    Condition of gutters, downspouts and extensions: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Attic inspection method: Viewed from hatch(es)
    Roof structure type: Rafters
    Ceiling structure: Trusses
    Ceiling insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Roof ventilation: Appears serviceable
    18)   The downspout extension at the north west corner drains onto the walkway. This may result in ice or moss forming on walkways, and may pose a fall hazard. A qualified person should evaluate and install or modify extensions as necessary so rainwater isn't directed onto walkways.
    19) Paper facing on batt insulation in the attic was exposed. The paper facing is flammable, and poses a safety hazard due to the risk of fire. Also, the paper facing typically acts as a vapor barrier, and if located away from the interior surfaces, can trap moisture from condensation in the cavity between the paper facing and the interior spaces. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects. The inspector was unable to evaluate the structure obscured by the insulation. A qualified person should reinstall or replace the insulation as per standard building practices and as per the manufacturer's instructions.

    Photo 40  

    Photo 41  

    20) Flashings at the base of the chimney is corroded. Leaks may occur as a result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    21)   The ceiling insulation in some areas of the attic was missing, uneven. This may result in increased heating or cooling costs due to decreased energy efficiency. A qualified person should repair, replace or install insulation as necessary. For more information, visit:
    http://www.eere.energy.gov/consumer/tips/insulation.html

    Photo 25  
    Loose insulation and wiring at east attic.
     

    22)   The attic access hatch in the master bedroom is too small to allow easy access for periodic evaluation of the attic. Standard building practices require hatches to be at least 22 by 30 inches in size, and in accessible areas. Recommend having a qualified contractor enlarge the attic access as per standard building practices.
    23) The peak of the south end of the upper roof appears to be damaged and should be evaluated and repaired by a qualified roofing contractor.

    Photo 14  
    Roof damage at peak.
     

    24) In some areas of the roof there are loose or raised nails or shingles. The nails could wear through the shingles and leak. Wind driven rain could get under the loose shingles. Recommend a roofing contractor evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 15  
    Loose roofing nail.

    Photo 16  
    Exposed sheathing.

    25)   No insulation was installed at the access hatches. Recommend installing insulation at hatches where missing for better energy efficiency. For more information, visit:
    http://www.reporthost.com/_docs/atticaccess.pdf

    26) Moss was growing on the roof. As a result, shingles may lift or be damaged. Leaks may result and/or the roof surface may fail prematurely. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Efforts should be taken to kill the moss during its growing season (wet months). Typically zinc-based chemicals are used for this, and must be applied periodically. For information on various moss treatment products and their pros and cons, visit:
    http://bryophytes.science.oregonstate.edu/page24.htm

    27) Trees were overhanging roof and were within 10 feet of roof vertically. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since organic debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate on the roof surface. Accumulated debris may cause water to enter gaps in the roof surface and leak into attic and/or interior spaces. Trees should be pruned so they are at least 10 feet above roof, or don't overhang the roof.

    Photo 32  
    Roof damage from tree(green arrow). Hole in siding( blue circle).
     

    28)   Stains were visible on the roof structure in one or more areas visible from the attic access. These areas were dry at the time of the inspection. The stains may be caused by a past leak. The client should monitor these areas in the future, especially after heavy rains, to determine if active leaks exist. If leaks are found, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    29) One or more downspouts terminated above roof surfaces rather than being routed to gutters below or to the ground level. This is very common, but it can reduce the life of roof surface materials below due to large amounts of water frequently flowing over the roof surface. Granules typically are washed off of composition shingles as a result, and leaks may occur. Also the gutters terminate close to the gable end of the upper roof, rot may occur. Recommend considering having a qualified contractor install extensions as necessary so downspouts don't terminate above roof surfaces.

    Photo 9  
    Incomplete gutter assembly.

    Photo 13  
    Incomplete gutter assembly.

    30)   All attic and roof structure sections more than 8 feet from the access hatch(es) were inaccessible due to possible damage to insulation, lack of permanent walkways, ducts or pipes blocking, or small access. These areas are excluded from the inspection.
     
    Electric Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: surge suppressors, inaccessible or concealed wiring; underground utilities and systems; low voltage lighting or lighting on timers or sensors. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of grounding or bonding, does not determine if this system has an adequate capacity for the client's specific needs, nor determine if this system has any reserve capacity for additions or expansion. The inspector does not operate circuit breakers as part of the inspection, install or change light bulbs, nor determine the operability of every wall switch.
    Electric service condition: Appeared serviceable
    Primary service type: Overhead
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service entrance conductor material: Aluminum
    Main disconnect rating (amps): 200
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil
    Condition of main service panel: Appeared serviceable
    Location of main service panel #A: Basement
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    Condition of smoke detectors: Appeared serviceable
    Smoke detectors present: Yes
    Smoke detector power source: Not determined
    31)   The main services panel is not attached securely to the wall. This is a safety hazard for shock and/or fire. A qualified electrician should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    32)   One of the screws in the main services panel is pointed. This is a safety hazard for shock since the screw(s) may cut through the wire insulation and cause a short circuit. Long and/or pointed crews should be replaced as necessary with the correct screws. A qualified person should repair as necessary, such as moving conductors inside the panel, so screws don't come in contact with the conductors.
    33)   Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
    34)   At the time of this inspection the there was no power to the receptacle that is out side the master bedroom door. Switches may need to be operated to make some receptacles energized. And there was not a bulb in the exterior fixture,it's operation is undetermined,If necessary, a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    35)   Other then the above concerns, the electrical system was in very good condition at the time of this inspection.
     
    Plumbing / Fuel Systems Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: private wells and sewage disposal systems; main, side and lateral sewer lines; gray water systems; pressure boosting systems; incinerating or composting toilets; fire suppression sprinkler systems; water softeners, conditioners or filtering systems; plumbing components concealed within the foundation or building structure, or in inaccessible areas such as below tubs; underground utilities and systems; overflow drains for tubs and sinks; backflow prevention devices. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not test for lead in the water supply, the water pipes or solder, does not determine if plumbing and fuel lines are adequately sized, and does not determining the existence or condition of underground or above-ground fuel tanks.
    Condition of service and main line: Appeared serviceable
    Location of main water meter: North west corner of property
    Location of main water shut: South west corner of basement
    Water service: Public
    Water pressure (psi): 100>psi
    Service pipe material: Copper, Plastic
    Condition of supply lines: Appeared serviceable
    Supply pipe material: Copper, Polyethylene
    Waste pipe material: Plastic, Not determined
    Condition of fuel system: Appeared serviceable
    Location of main fuel shut: At natural gas meter on west side of house
    36)   The water supply pressure was greater than 80 psi. Pressures above 80 psi may void warranties for some appliances such as water heaters or washing machines. Flexible supply lines to washing machines are more likely to burst with higher pressures. Typically the pressure cannot be regulated at the water meter. Recommend having a qualified plumber evaluate and make modifications to reduce the pressure below 80 psi. Installing a pressure reducing valve on the main service pipe is a common solution to this problem. If one exists, then it should be adjusted for lower pressures.

    Photo 12  
    High water pressure. Greater than 100 psi
     

    37) The drain pipes under kitchen sink are loose and unsecured. Recommend that a qualified plumber replaces or repair as necessary.

    Photo 20  
    Sub-standard plumbing. Weak connections.
     

    38)   No expansion tank was installed on this structure's water supply system. Expansion tanks are recommended when a property is on a public water supply system and the property's water system is "closed" via a pressure reducing valve (PRV), check valve, or backflow preventer. No room for expansion of water exists in this type of system. Thermal expansion occurs when water is heated during non-use periods. In a closed system with no provision for expansion, its effects may include:

  • Backflow into the water main
  • Damage to water heater connections, gas water heater flue tubes and pumps serving washers and dishwashers
  • Leaking faucets
  • "Weeping" of water through the water heater temperature-pressure relief (TPR) valve
  • Noisy water hammer in the pipes.

    Expansion tanks can eliminate these problems by giving water a place to go when thermal expansion occurs. When a water heating cycle ends, or when any fixture is opened within the system, the impact of thermal expansion is reduced, and water drains out of the expansion tank back into the system. Recommend having a qualified plumber install an expansion tank as per standard building practices.
    39)   Some of the insulation on water supply pipes in the crawl space, basement was substandard. A qualified person should evaluate and replace or repair insulation as necessary for better energy efficiency and to prevent water pipes from freezing.
     
    Water Heater Return to table of contents
    Condition of water heater: Appeared serviceable
    Type: Tank
    Estimated age: Jan. 2006
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): 50
    Manufacturer: Bradford White
    Model: MITW50L6BN15
    Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 136
    Condition of burners: Appeared serviceable
    Condition of venting system: Appeared serviceable
    40)   The hot water temperature was greater than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of scalding. The thermostat should be adjusted so the water temperature doesn't exceed 120 degrees. For more information on scalding dangers, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5098.pdf

    41)   The water heater was installed in an unheated space and was not resting on an insulated pad. Recommend installing an insulated pad under the water heater for better energy efficiency.
     
    Heating Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: humidifiers, dehumidifiers, electronic air filters; solar, coal or wood fired heat systems; thermostat or temperature control accuracy and timed functions; heating components concealed within the building structure or in inaccessible areas; underground utilities and systems; safety devices and controls (due to automatic operation). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of remaining life on heating system components, does not determine if heating systems are appropriately sized, or perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit. It is beyond the scope of this inspection to determine if furnace heat exchangers are intact and free of leaks.
    Condition of heating system: Appeared serviceable
    Location of heating system: Basement
    Heating type: Forced air
    Fuel type: Natural gas
    Manufacturer: York
    Last service date: unknown
    Model: O3URD16N07501A
    Condition of distribution system: Appeared serviceable
    Distribution system: Ducts and registers
    42)   The last service date of this system appeared to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
     
    Fireplaces / Stoves / Chimneys Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: coal stoves, gas logs, chimney flues (except where visible). Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of drafting or sizing in fireplace and stove flues, nor determine if prefabricated or zero clearance fireplaces are installed in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. The inspector does not perform any evaluations that require a pilot light to be lit.
    Condition of fireplaces, stoves: Required repair, replacement and/or evaluation (see comments below)
    Fireplace type: Masonry
    Fuel type: Natural gas
    Chimney type: Masonry
    43)   The firebox at location # showed moderate, major evidence of deterioration, including cracked, deteriorated mortar, bricks. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 21  
    Hole in fireplace masonry.

    Photo 22  
    Close-up of hole in fireplace masonry.

    44)   Because of the flue, wood stove or fireplace configuration, the inspector was unable to determine if flue had significant amounts of accumulated creosote. Recommend that a qualified contractor inspect, and clean and repair if necessary.
    45)   The masonry chimney showed moderate evidence of deterioration, including cracked, deteriorated, spalled mortar, concrete. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
    46) Gaps were found between the chimney and the building exterior. A qualified person should repair as necessary to prevent water, insect and/or vermin intrusion.
    47)   The gas at fireplace was not fully evaluated because of the following conditions: . As per the Standards of Practice for National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI) the inspector does not operate gas shut off valves or light pilot lights during inspections.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: free-standing or portable appliances such as dishwashers, trash compactors, refrigerators, freezers, ice makers; specialty appliances such as hot water dispensers, water filters and trash compactors; appliance timers, clocks, cook functions, self and/or continuous cleaning operations, thermostat or temperature control accuracy, and lights. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not provide an estimate of the remaining life of appliances, and does not determine the adequacy of operation of appliances such as dishwashers, garbage disposals, trash compactors, ovens, broilers, etc.
    Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
    Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
    Condition of dishwasher: Appeared serviceable
    Condition of range, cooktop: Appeared serviceable
    Range, cooktop type: Electric
    Condition of refrigerator: Appeared serviceable
    48)   The range could tip forward, and an anti-tip bracket may not be installed. This is a safety hazard since the range may tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it, or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free standing ranges since 1985. An anti-tip bracket should be installed to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/remodeling/article/0,1797,HGTV_3659_2017492,00.html
    49)   No duct was installed for the cooktop exhaust fan. Ventilation may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a duct so the exhaust fan vents outdoors.
     
    Bathrooms / Laundry / Sinks Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: overflow drains for tubs and sinks; bidets, heated towel racks, saunas, steam generators, clothes washers, clothes dryers. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not determine the adequacy of washing machine drain lines, washing machine catch pan drain lines, or clothes dryer exhaust ducts. The inspector does not operate water supply or shut-off valves for sinks, toilets, bidets, clothes washers, etc. due to the possibility of valves leaking or breaking when operated. The inspector does not determine if shower pans or tub and shower enclosures are water tight, or determine the completeness or operability of any gas piping to laundry appliances.
    Condition of counters: Appeared serviceable
    Condition of cabinets: Appeared serviceable
    Condition of sinks and related plumbing: Appeared serviceable
    Condition of toilets: Appeared serviceable
    Condition of ventilation systems: Appeared serviceable
    Condition of laundry facilities: Appeared serviceable
    240 volt receptacle for laundry equipment present: Yes
    50) Possible moisture damage was found in floor areas by the bathtub at upstairs. A qualified person should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 23  
    Leak at shower door frame.

    Photo 24  
    High moisture content below shower leak.

    51)     The power supply at the back of the dryer is improperly secured .Recommend that a qualified electrician or appliance repair person properly secure with proper wire clamp.

    Photo 19  
    Power supply at back of dryer not properly secured.
     
     
    Interior Rooms / Areas Return to table of contents
    Limitations: The following items are not included in this inspection: security, intercom and sound systems; communications wiring; central vacuum systems; elevators and stair lifts; sources of obnoxious odors; cosmetic deficiencies due to normal wear and tear in wall, floor and ceiling surfaces and coverings, or in equipment; deficiencies relating to interior decorating; low voltage and gas lighting systems. Any comments made regarding these items are as a courtesy only. Note that the inspector does not evaluate any areas or items which require moving stored items, furnishings, debris, equipment, floor coverings, insulation or similar materials. The inspector does not test for asbestos, lead, radon, mold, hazardous waste, urea formaldehyde urethane, or any other toxic substance. Some items such as window operability are tested on a sampled basis. The client should be aware that paint may obscure wall and ceiling defects, floor coverings may obscure floor defects, and furnishings may obscure wall, floor and floor covering defects. If furnishings were present during the inspection, recommend a full evaluation of walls, floors and ceilings that were previously obscured when possible. Determining the cause of odors is not within the scope of this inspection.
    Wall type or covering: Drywall
    Condition of walls: Appeared serviceable
    Ceiling type or covering: Drywall
    Condition of ceilings: Appeared serviceable
    Flooring type or covering: Carpet, Wood
    Condition of flooring: Appeared serviceable
    52)   Floors in one or more areas were not level. Significant repairs may be needed to make floors level, such as repairs to the foundation. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.
    53)   There is a settlement crack at the beam in living room. This is a common condition of apparent uniform settlement and not appear to be a structural concern at the time of this inspection.

    Photo 27  
    Settlement gap at beam.
     

    54)   Minor cracks and/or holes were found in walls in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
    55)   Minor cracks and/or holes were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.
    56)   Carpeting in one or more areas was stained or soiled. Recommend having carpeting professionally cleaned as necessary.
     
    Structural Pest Findings Return to table of contents
    Limitations: This report only includes findings from accessible and visible areas on the day of the inspection. In addition to the inaccessible areas documented in this report, examples of other inaccessible areas include: sub areas less than 18 inches in height; attic areas less than five feet in height, areas blocked by ducts, pipes or insulation; areas where locks or permanently attached covers prevent access; areas where insulation would be damaged if traversed; areas obscured by vegetation. All inaccessible areas are subject to infestation or damage from wood destroying organisms. The inspector does not move furnishings, stored items, debris, floor or wall coverings, insulation, or other materials as part of the inspection, nor perform destructive testing. Wood destroying organisms may infest, reinfest or become active at anytime. No warranty is provided as part of this inspection.
    Visible evidence of active wood decay fungi: No
    Visible evidence of past wood destroying insects: No
    Visible evidence of past wood decay fungi: Yes
    Visible evidence of conditions conducive to wood destroying organisms: YesWet basement and rot at gable end(north west corner)
     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Footing material: Not visible
    Foundation material: BrickConcrete renforsed foam.
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Wall covering: Wood clapboard, Composition wood panels
    Driveway material: N/A
    Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete, Paving stones
    Exterior door material: Solid core fiberglass, Glass panel
    57) Flashing is missing from above all deck ledger boards. This can cause moisture to accumulate between the ledger board(s) and the structure. Rot may result in this area and cause the ledger board fasteners to fail. The deck may separate from the structure in this event and poses a significant safety hazard. A qualified contractor should install flashing above ledger board(s) where necessary. For more information on installing deck ledger boards visit: http://www.hometime.com/Howto/projects/decks/deck_4.htm

    And for more information on building safe decks in general, visit: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow/exteriors/article/0,16417,212625,00.html

    58)   All deck ledger boards are nailed to the structure rather than being attached by adequate fasteners. This poses a significant safety hazard since the ledger board(s) may separate from the structure, causing the deck(s) to collapse. A qualified contractor should install lag screws or bolts as per standard building practices to securely attach the ledger board(s) to the structure. For more information on installing deck ledger boards visit: http://www.hometime.com/Howto/projects/decks/deck_4.htm

    And for more information on building safe decks in general, visit: http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/knowhow/exteriors/article/0,16417,212625,00.html

    59) Rot was found at one or more rafter and/or barge board ends. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing or removing rotten wood.

    Photo 31  
    rot at end of rafter.
     

    60) Rot was found at the base of the stair stringers. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. All rotten wood should be replaced or removed and soil should be graded and/or removed if necessary to maintain at least a 6" gap between wood and soil.
    61) There is a piece of form material in the foundation at the drain on west side of house. This is a conducive condition that could attract wood destroying insects or rot. recommend that material be removed.

    Photo 18  
    Form material not removed
     

    62) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

    Photo 4  
    Vegetation and tree to close to house.
     

    63) This property is clad with composition wood fiber siding. Many brands of this type of siding by different manufacturers are known to deteriorate and/or fail prematurely due to moisture penetration. Failure is typically visible in the form of swelling, cracking and delamination, especially at the bottom edges. Class action lawsuits have been filed or are being filed against most manufacturers of this material.

    Some areas of siding on this structure show the symptoms described above, but it appears that the siding hasn't deteriorated to the point of needing replacement. Some manufacturers (Louisiana Pacific) recommend a repair process for this siding where affected areas are sealed with "Permanizer Plus", a flexible primer made by Pittsburgh Paint, followed by two coats of 100% acrylic latex paint. This sealant must be applied to the bottom edges using a brush. The face of the siding can be sprayed. The "Permanizer Plus" sealer isn't required for edges that aren't swollen, cracked or deteriorated, but the acrylic latex should still be brushed on these edges.

    At a minimum, recommend having a qualified contractor seal and repaint as described above, or by other methods specified by the siding's manufacturer. The client(s) may wish to have a qualified contractor evaluate further to determine if some or all of the siding should be replaced.

    For more information, visit:
    Pittsburgh Paints, PRIMERS -THE FOUNDATION FOR A TOP QUALITY JOB
    Failing LP Siding Help Page

    64) The basement window at the east side of home is at or below grade. This is a conducive condition that could allow moisture to enter basement. recommend that soil be removed below sill or install a window well at this location.

    Photo 6  
    Grade too high at window sill.
     

    65) The finish on the deck(s) and railing(s) is worn and/or deteriorated. Recommend cleaning and refinishing as necessary.

    Photo 39  
     

    66) One or more downspouts terminate above roof surfaces rather than being routed to gutters below or to the ground level. This is very common, but it can reduce the life of roof surface materials below due to large amounts of water frequently flowing over the roof surface. Granules typically are washed off of composition shingles as a result, and leaks may occur. Recommend considering having a qualified contractor install extensions as necessary so downspouts don't terminate above roof surfaces.
    67)   The back light fixture has missing bulb and could not be fully evaluated. Bulbs may simply need to be installed, or repairs or replacement may be necessary.
     
    Curtis C Brown CURTIS C HOME INSPECTION SERVICE LLC curtiscservices@yahoo.com (360)296-4020