View as PDF

At Home Inspections, Inc.

Website: http://www.reporthost.com/AtHomeMonte
Email: InspectorMonte@gmail.com
Phone: (718) 877-9745
Inspector: Debra Monte

 

PROPERTY INSPECTION REPORT
Client(s): Mr. & Mrs. Homebuyer
Property address: 123 USA St
Middletown, NY 10940
Inspection date: Friday, May 01, 2009
This report published on 5/30/2009 11:41:40 AM EDT

View summary page

This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.

This inspection and report was completed by Debra Monte, New York State Home Inspector, License Number 16000040194, an InterNACHI member, #0910302 in good standing.

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information. Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
SafetyPoses a risk of injury or death 
Major DefectCorrection likely involves a significant expense 
Repair/ReplaceRecommend repairing or replacing 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
Minor DefectCorrection likely involves only a minor expense 
MaintainRecommend ongoing maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Structural Pest Inspection Concerns
Items of concern relating to the structural pest inspection are shown as follows:
WDO/WDI InfestationEvidence of infestation of wood destroying insects or organisms (Live or dead insect bodies, fungal growth, etc.) 
WDO/WDI DamageDamage caused by wood destroying insects or organisms (Rot, carpenter ant galleries, etc.) 
WDO/WDI Conducive
conditions
Conditions conducive for wood destroying insects or organisms (Wood-soil contact, shrubs in contact with siding, roof or plumbing leaks, etc.) 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplace and chimney
Crawl space
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms

 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: 001-09
Inspector: Debra Monte
Structures inspected: House & detached garage
Type of building: Single family Colonial
Age of building: circa 1940
Property owner's name: N/A - Listed by Real Estate United
Time started: 11:00 am
Time finished: 2:00 pm
Inspection Fee: N/A
Payment method: Cash
Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: Yes
Weather conditions: Cloudy, Rain
Temperature: Cool
Ground condition: Damp
Ground condition: Wet
Front of structure faces: Southeast
Main entrance faces: Southeast
Excluded from this inspection: Playground equipment & crawl space beneath front porch (inaccessible).
1)   This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
2)   Structures built prior to 1979 may contain lead-based paint and/or asbestos in various building materials such as insulation, siding, and/or floor and ceiling tiles. Both lead and asbestos are known health hazards. Evaluating for the presence of lead and/or asbestos is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consult with specialists as necessary, such as industrial hygienists, professional labs and/or abatement contractors for this type of evaluation. For information on lead, asbestos and other hazardous materials in homes, visit these websites:
  • The Environmental Protection Association (http://www.epa.gov)
  • The Consumer Products Safety Commission (http://www.cpsc.gov)
  • The Center for Disease Control (http://www.cdc.gov)
    3)   Some wall, floor and/or ceiling surfaces were obscured by furniture and/or stored items. Some areas couldn't be evaluated.
     
    Exterior Return to table of contents
    Footing material: Not visible
    Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
    Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
    Wall covering: Vinyl and Aluminum
    Driveway material: Asphalt
    Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
    Exterior door material: Solid core wood
    4)   One or more outside faucets are missing backflow prevention devices. These devices reduce the likelihood of polluted or contaminated water entering the potable water supply. This condition can occur when an outside faucet is left in the "on" position with a hose connected and the sprayer head turned off. When pressure in the system fluctuates, water can be drawn back into the water supply pipes from the house. If a chemical sprayer is being used with the hose, those chemicals can enter the water supply pipes.

    Recommend installing backflow prevention devices on all exterior hose bibs where missing. They are available at most home improvement stores and are easily installed. For more information, visit: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/BODY_AE079

    Photo 10  
     

    5)   One or more hornet, bee and/or wasp nests were found. These can pose a safety hazard. However, it appears to be vacant but can easily become occupied again. Therefore, nest(s) should be removed as necessary.

    Photo 2  
     

    6)   Water supply pipes are routed outside and are subject to freezing. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) if inside shut-off valves exist for these supply pipes. If unable to determine if shut-off valve(s) exist, or if none do, then a qualified plumber should evaluate and install interior shut-off valves as necessary to prevent pipes from freezing and bursting.
    7) One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.
    8) One or more downspouts and/or drain pipes are dented, damaged and/or crushed. This can restrict the water flow and result in clogging and overflowing gutters. Water may accumulate around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Damaged downspouts and drain pipes should be repaired or replaced as necessary, and by a qualified contractor if necessary.

    Photo 13  
    Ceramic drain pipe broken in front right corner near porch.

    Photo 20  
    Danaged/dented downspout, with objects stuck in drainpipe.

    Photo 30  
    Broken ceramic drain pipe and downspout extension too short/does not go directly into drain in rear of house.
     

    9) Siding and/or trim is incomplete, missing or damaged in one or more areas, in particular at seam where flashing is also missing. A qualified contractor should install siding and/or trim where missing to prevent water and vermin intrusion.

    Photo 4  
    Siding trim not complete/missing, exposing wood.

    Photo 14  
    Siding incomplete and missing flashing (front right side of house).

    Photo 27  
    Siding trim damaged/dented by rear door & gate.
     

    10)   Mortar between brick step risers is deteriorated as well as parging on exterior of some areas of the foundation wall. To prevent further damage, water intrusion and/or injury, it is recommended that a qualified contractor repair/repoint mortar and replace parging to affected areas.

    Photo 19  
    Cracked/deteriorated parging on foundation walls.

    Photo 22  
    Rear steps with deteriorated mortar.

    Photo 23  
    Masonry risers to rear steps are deteriorated and require repointing.
     

    11) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. Photo shows a vertical crack in the exterior foundation parge, which was not visible inside the basement. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply. See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/HydraulicWater-StopCement.html for an example.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply). See http://www.quickrete.com/catalog/GrayConcreteRepair.html for an example.
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair). See http://www.mountaingrout.com/ for examples of these products.

    Photo 21  
     

    12) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior, in addition to stored items (bags of mulch). Vegetation and items stored up against the exterior of the house can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior, in addition to maintaining a path to the main fuel source (gas meter). Stored items (bags of mulch, etc) should be removed and stored in a dry place, such as the garage.

    Photo 15  
    Vegetation and bags of mulch against house. Path to gas meter difficult to access.

    Photo 31  
    Vegetation against right/northeast side of house.

    13)   Securing bolt missing from handrail on front porch. Although the rail appears to be stationary and steady, a qualified contractor should install a bolt where missing as per standard building practices.

    Photo 9  
     

    14)   Items (iron stair rails) and debris stored in area next to 2 ft retaining wall by driveway and garage. Items should be removed as they are not stationary and can attract vermin and more debris. With regard to the retaining wall, no fence or guardrail is required for walls that are less than 3 ft. However, as a safety measure, it is wise to install a fence or guardrail if small children will occupy or visit the house.

    Photo 26  
    Stored items and unattached handrail below retaining wall.
     

    15) The exterior finish on the front porch floor, guardrails and steps is failing/peeling/cracking, as well as the side exterior door. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices. Recommend installing a storm door on the side exterior door, which will prevent water intrusion and damage to the door, as well as add security.

    Photo 7  
    Paint peeling/crackin/worn off on guardrail of front porch.

    Photo 8  
    Paint worn/peeling/cracking on front steps and porch floor.

    Photo 11  
    Paint failing/peeling/cracking on posts and bases of posts on front porch.

    Photo 12  
    Paint failing/cracking/peeling on front porch floor.

    Photo 18  
    Paint cracking/failing on side exterior door.
     

     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from eaves on ladder
    Roof type: Gambrel
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 5 +/- years
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    16) Flashing on chimney appears to have some damage or deterioration and may result in leaks or vermin intrusion. This may be the source of water intrusion inside the attic. A qualified contractor should replace flashings where necessary.

    Photo 1  

    Photo 6  

    17) Debris has accumulated in one or more gutters,despite the presence of gutter covers. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects since gutters may overflow and cause water to come in contact with the structure's exterior or make water accumulate around the foundation. Gutters should be cleaned now and as necessary in the future.

    Photo 17  
    Debris inside gutter.
     

    18) Trees are overhanging roof and are within 10 feet of roof vertically. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms since organic debris such as leaves or needles are more likely to accumulate on the roof surface. Accumulated debris may cause water to enter gaps in the roof surface and leak into attic and/or interior spaces. Trees should be pruned so they are at least 10 feet above roof, or don't overhang the roof and debris should be removed from the roof.

    Photo 5  
    Tree in front of house overhangs within 10 feet;of leaves and debris on roof and gutters. Downspouts too short, don't extend to gutter; moisture and moss on roofing shingles.

    Photo 16  
    View from eaves, downspout too short; does not terminate in gutter. Leaves/debris from tree on roof above front porch. Shingles with moisture and start of moss on shingles where downspout too short.

    19)   Because of the configuration of the roof, the inspector was unable to traverse the roof, but evaluated it from the eaves on a ladder.
     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    20)   The auto-reverse mechanism on the vehicle door opener is operable, but requires too much force to activate. This is a safety hazard, especially for small children. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary. For more information on garage door safety issues, visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/523.html or http://www.ohdstl.com/safety.html
    21)   Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
    22)   Weatherstrip at the sides and/or bottom of the vehicle door is damaged and/or deteriorated. It should be replaced where necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.
    23) Paint is failing/peeling/cracking on the vehicle door, which could lead to water penetration and damage. Exterior surfaces should be maintained with sanding,paint, stain or finish as necessary.
    24)   Much of the garage, including areas around the interior perimeter and in the center are excluded from this inspection due to lack of access from stored items.

    Photo 24  
     

    25)     Interior walls are deteriorated and should be replaced by a qualified contractor with fire-rated materials such as drywall.

    Photo 25  
     

     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Traversed finished attic
    Ceiling structure: Ceiling beams visible inside eave closet/crawl spaces.
    Insulation material: Fiberglass roll or batt approximately 6 inches.
    Insulation depth: 6 inches
    Floor: Wooden planks are worn. Recommend sanding and resealing or covering with laminate or solid wood.
    26)   a. Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.
    b. Efflorescence, white stains indicative of water intrusion (past or present) are visible on the masonry/brick chimney in the attic room. As per the Realtor, the owner disclosed that the chimney was repaired or replaced within the past two years and appears to be in serviceable condition, with the exception of the chimney wall inside the attic room, which has water stains that extend to the wood planks on the floor. This section of chimney should be evaluated and repaired/repointed by a qualified contractor.

    Photo 58  
    Missing cover plate.

    Photo 59  
    Red circle: Missing cover plate.
    Yellow arrow: Water stains on chimney in attic room.

    27)   Ceiling insulation is missing in some areas (inside closets/crawl spaces. Recommend installing insulation where missing for better energy efficiency.
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Overhead/Service drop
    Primary service overload protection type: Cartridge Fuses linked to Circuit breakers in panel below fuse box
    Service entrance conductor material: Copper-clad aluminum
    System ground: Ground rod(s) in soil, Cold water supply pipes
    Branch circuit wiring type: (BX) Armor clad
    Service amperage (amps): 60
    Solid strand aluminum branch circuit wiring present: No
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: Southeast wall of basement (near south corner) below indoor electric meter.
    Main disconnect rating (amps): Cartridge fuse box, pull out fuses.
    Location of main disconnect: No single main disconnect, use all breakers in main service panel
    Smoke detectors present: Present in basement and kitchen. However, smoke detector in basement is inoperable. Replacement of batteries or smoke detectors is recommended. Smoke detectors should also be installed near all sleeping areas/bedrooms on 2nd floor.
    28)   One neutral white conductor is being used as a hot wire and not marked as such. This could be a safety concern and should be evaluated and repaired/marked by a qualified electrician.

    Photo 34  
    White neutral wire being used as a hot wire without being marked as such.
     

    29)   One or more screws are missing from the top of the main service panel cover and should be replaced (only two screws at the bottom front of panel). Because energized wiring may exist behind the holes with the missing screws, recommend that a qualified, licensed electrician replace these screws, or that care be taken to ensure that the new screws do not come in contact with wiring inside the panel when they are installed. Stock screws from the panel manufacturer should be used, or their equivalent.
    30)   The electric service to this property may be rated at substantially less than 200 amps, and may be inadequate for the client(s) needs. Recommend consulting with a qualified electrician about upgrading to a 200 amp service.
    31)   The main is an old fuse box with cartridge fuses. There appears to have been some type of upgrade to the old electric service, whereby an electric panel box with circuit breakers was added below the old main fuse box. This may be adequate for now, but may be safer and more efficient to have a full upgrade.
    A qualified electrician is recommended to evaluate and fully upgrade the electric service to a full main electric panel box and to have the electric meter placed on the exterior of the house for easy access for reading the meter.

    Photo 32  
    Cartridge fuses in main fuse panel between electric meter and a panel of circuit breakers below.

    Photo 33  

    32)   The legend for overcurrent protection devices (breakers or fuses) in the main service panel is missing, unreadable or incomplete. Recommend installing, updating or correcting the legend as necessary so it's accurate. Evaluation by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 10 + years (1998 noted on tank)
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Natural gas
    Capacity (in gallons): 40
    Manufacturer: Sears Kenmore
    Model: 153336452 - Serial #:H00438909
    Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 138〫F
    33)   The drain line to the water heater's temperature-pressure relief valve terminates less than 6 inches from the floor. This is a potential safety hazard due to the risk of explosion. A drain line that terminates less than 6 inches from the floor can result in the water heater exploding if or when the valve opens due to restricted venting. The drain line should be modified, and by a qualified contractor if necessary, so it terminates 6" from the floor.

    Photo 45  
    Extension drain line for water heater's Temperature Pressure Relief system is too long (only 2 inches from the floor).
     

    34)   The hot water temperature is greater than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of scalding. The thermostat should be adjusted so the water temperature doesn't exceed 120 degrees. For more information on scalding dangers, visit http://www.tap-water-burn.com/

    Photo 44  
    Thermostat set to 140〫F.
     

    35)   The estimated useful life for most water heaters is 8 to 12 years. This water heater appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    36) Corrosion or mineral deposits found on fittings and/or water supply lines for the water heater. Leaks may exist, although no active leak was noted at time of inspection. A qualified plumbing contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 42  
    Mineral deposits noted on cold water supply near valve.
     

     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 5 + years
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Forced air with humidifier.
    Primary A/C energy source: Natural Gas
    Primary Air conditioning type: Heat pump and condensate pump.
    Distribution system: Sheet metal ducts
    Manufacturer: Lennox
    Filter location: In return air duct side of furnace, Trion. Filter clean.
    Model: Merit Series (mid-efficiency) G40UH (10 year warranty on parts & 20 years on heat exchanger) 6 burners.
    Last service date: 10/7/04 as per service sticker. However, filter and furnace is clean. Furnace and air conditioner appears to run sufficiently.
    37)   The last service date of this system appears to be more than one year ago, or the inspector was unable to determine the last service date. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) when it was last serviced. If unable to determine the last service date, or if this system was serviced more than one year ago, a qualified heating and cooling contractor should inspect, clean, and service this system, and make repairs if necessary. For safety reasons, and because this system is fueled by gas or oil, this servicing should be performed annually in the future. For more information visit: http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html

    Photo 43  
     

    38)   The cooling fins on the outdoor condensing unit's evaporator coils are dirty with white residue all around the bottom 1/3 of the cooling fins, which most likely is from dog urine. This may result in reduced efficiency and higher energy costs, in addition to deterioratio of the cooling fins. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should clean the evaporator coils as necessary.
    A water hose is on top of the condensing unit. This should be removed, as all items should be kept away from the condensing unit to assure proper operation.

    Photo 28  
    Lower part of condensing unit fins have residue, most likely from dog urine.

    Photo 29  
    Water hose on top of condensing unit.

    39)   Air filter(s) is clean and should be checked and replaced monthly as per manufacturer recommendations. Additionally, a high efficiency microbial/hepa filter is recommended. A record or sticker of filter and maintenance should be maintained on or near the furnace/air conditioning unit.
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Water pressure (psi): Adequate to slightly low.
    Water service: Public
    Drain pipe material: PVC and galvanized steel.
    Waste pipe material: Cast iron
    Drain pipe material: Copper
    Vent pipe material: Galvanized steel
    Washer/Dryer combo:: Sears Kenmore located in kitchen. Washer also located in basement.
    40)   No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection device is visible for the sump pump electric supply. A qualified electrician should determine if a GFCI protection device (receptacle or circuit breaker) exists for the sump pump and install one if missing to reduce the danger of electric shock.

    Photo 40  
    Non GFCI receptacle.
     

    41)   The clothes dryer is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information on dryer safety issues, see http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html
    42)   Copper water supply pipes in homes built prior to 1986 may be joined with solder that contains lead. Lead is a known health hazard, especially for children. Laws were passed in 1985 prohibiting the use of lead in solder, but prior to that solder normally contained about 50 percent lead. The client(s) should be aware of this, especially if children will be living in this structure. Evaluating for the presence of lead in this structure is not included in this inspection. The client(s) should consider having a qualified lab test for lead, and if necessary take steps to reduce or remove lead from the water supply. Various solutions such as these may be advised:

  • Flush water taps or faucets. Do not drink water that has been sitting in the plumbing lines for more than six hours.
  • Install appropriate filters at points of use.
  • Use only cold water for cooking and drinking. Hot water dissolves lead more quickly than cold water.
  • Use bottled or distilled water.
  • Treat well water to make it less corrosive.
  • Have a qualified plumbing contractor replace supply pipes and/or plumbing components as necessary.

    For more information visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5056.html
    http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead/index.html
    43) a.Corrosion or mineral deposits were visible on one or more areas of copper water supply pipes. This most often occurs with acid water with a pH of less than 6.5. Leaks may result because of this.
    b. Stains found on foundation wall where water supply line enters basement foundation wall.
    A qualified plumber should evaluate and replace water supply components as necessary. The client(s) should consult with a qualified plumber regarding the possibility of acidic water, and what solutions may be available to neutralize the pH.

    Photo 35  
    Mineral deposits found on joint connection of cold water supply.

    Photo 37  
    Water stains on foundation wall and rust/corrosion to water supply pipe.

    44)   Recommend having the septic tank inspected. Recommend having the tank pumped if it was last pumped more than 3 years ago.
    45) A stain was found in one section of main waste pipe around cap (South corner of basement). Recommend monitoring the cap and this areas in the future, and if leaks are found, have a qualified plumber evaluate and repair as necessary. Alternatively, the client(s) may wish to have a qualified plumber evaluate now and repair if necessary.
    46)   A sump pump is installed on the premises. This may indicate that water accumulates inside or below the structure. Recommend asking the property owners how often the sump pump operates and for how long at different times of the year. Also, the clients should be aware that the service life of most sump pumps is between five and seven years, and that the pump may need replacing soon depending on its age and how much it operates.
    47)   Clothes washer was operated or evaluated. It is excluded from this inspection.
     
    Fireplace and chimney Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Masonry, Masonry with metal liner
    Chimney type: Masonry
    48)   Although the chimney has been recently repaired/restored, a section of the interior chimney wall that is exposed in the attic has deteriorated masonry with signs of water penetration. The masonry should be repaired to prevent further, significant deterioration. Recommend having a qualified chimney service contractor or mason evaluate chimney and repair as necessary. This will likely require repointing the mortar.

    Photo 57  
    Efflocrensence and water stains on interior chimney in attic extending to wooden floor planks with moisture present.Mortar between bricks deteriorated and in need of repair.
     

    49)   An antenna is attached to the chimney with metal bands. Recommend removing antenna from the chimney as it could cause deterioration and damage to the chimney. Antennae should be properly placed and sealed on the roof or removed since the home is cable TV ready.

    Photo 3  
     

    50)   a. Significant amounts of ashes, wood and/or debris are in the fireplace. The inspector was unable to fully evaluate it.
    b. Damper operational and entrance to lower flue appeared to be clean. Unable to fully evaluate the flue from the chimney opening, since the inspector could not traverse the steep part of the roof.

    Photo 50  
    Ashes in fireplace.

    Photo 51  
    Damper opened.

    51)   All solid fuel burning appliances (woodstoves and fireplaces, etc.) should be inspected and cleaned annually by a qualified chimney service contractor, cleaned and repaired as necessary.
     
    Crawl space Return to table of contents
    Under Front Porch: Not inspected/inaccessible.
     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: None visible
    Pier or support post material: Steel
    Beam material: Solid wood
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    52)   Extension cord is used as permanent wiring in one or more areas. It should only be used for portable equipment on a temporary basis. Using extension cords as permanent wiring poses a fire and shock hazard, and is an indication that wiring is inadequate and should be updated. Extension cords may be undersized. Connections may not be secure, resulting in power fluctuations, damage to equipment, and sparks that could start a fire. Extension cords should be removed as necessary, or a qualified electrician should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, install additional circuits and/or electric receptacles.
    53)   a. Two-pronged electric receptacles rather than three-pronged, grounded receptacles are installed in one or more interior rooms. They are considered to be unsafe by today's standards and limit the ability to use appliances that require a ground in these rooms. A qualified electrician should replace receptacles to the NEC and building standards.
    b. Non-GFCI receptacle installed within 6 feet of a sink/wet area. A qualified electrician should replace receptacles with GFCI type within 6 feet of a sink or wet area.

    Photo 38  

    Photo 39  

    54)   Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 36  
    Cover missing to receptacle.

    Photo 41  
    Cover missing to junction box.

    55)   Small utility closet containing mops and brooms show signs of what appears to be black mold. Mold can be hazardous to health, in particular the respiratory system, especially for those with asthma and/or allergies or other lung conditions. This appears to be an isolated area for mold and most likely as a result of wet items being stored with the door closed. Mold should be properly removed/cleaned inside the closet and the area monitored periodically.
     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents
    Refrigerator: Sears Kenmore side by side with functioning water and ice maker.
    Range: Whirlpool with self cleaning oven operable.
    Dishwasher: Maytag, operable.
    Ceiling fan: Operable fan and light.
    56)   One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    57)   The range can tip forward, and no anti-tip bracket appears to be installed. This is a safety hazard since the range may tip forward when weight is applied to the open door, such as when a small child climbs on it, or if heavy objects are dropped on it. Anti-tip brackets have been sold with all free standing ranges since 1985. An anti-tip bracket should be installed to eliminate this safety hazard. For more information, visit http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/remodeling/article/0,1797,HGTV_3659_2017492,00.html
    58) Tile, stone and/or grout flooring is damaged/cracked/deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary. For example, replacing broken tiles and deteriorated grout, and resealing grout.

    Photo 49  
    Crack in floor tile.
     

    59)   Exhaust fan is noisy or vibrates excessively. Fan filter moves around in circular pattern with motor. A qualified contractor should evaluate and replace the fan or make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 48  
     

    60)   a. One or more cabinets and/or drawers are damaged and/or deteriorated.
    b. One or more hardware hinges, pulls or latches are damaged and/or deteriorated.
    A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace cabinets and/or hardware components as necessary.

    Photo 46  
    Latch broken.

    Photo 47  
    Cabinet cracked/deteriorated.

    61)   No range hood is installed over the range or cook top. Ventilation and/or lighting may be inadequate and moisture may accumulate indoors. Recommend having a qualified contractor install a vented and lighted range hood, with the exhaust fan configured so as to vent outdoors.
     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    62)   One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    63)   The enamel coating on the bathtub is damaged or deteriorated/rusted. However, no active leaks were found due to the deterioration. A small stain on the kitchen ceiling may or may not be related to the bathtub defect. The client(s) should evaluate to determine if the bathtub(s) should be refinished or replaced.

    Photo 55  
     

    64) Bathroom on 2nd floor with a shower does not have an exhaust fan installed. Moisture accumulation will occur and may damage the structure. Even if the bathroom has a window that opens, it likely does not provide adequate ventilation, especially during cold weather when the window is closed. A qualified contractor should install exhaust fans as per standard building practices where missing in bathroom with showers.
    65)   Sink stopper mechanism is missing (2nd floor bathroom), or need adjustment or repair. Stopper mechanisms should be installed where missing and/or repairs should be made so sink stoppers open and close easily.
    66)   Bathtub drain appears to drain slowly. Drain(s) should be cleared as necessary, and by a qualified plumber if necessary.
    67)   Tiles and grout near cold water supply for sink is missing with a large opening in wall, which could be an entry point for pests and takes away from aesthetic value. A qualified contractor should seal the wall and repair tile and/or grout.

    Photo 54  
     

     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents
    Ceiling fan: In master bedroom, operable fan and light.
    68)   Two-pronged electric receptacles rather than three-pronged, grounded receptacles are installed in one or more interior rooms. They are considered to be unsafe by today's standards and limit the ability to use appliances that require a ground in these rooms. Examples of appliances that require grounded receptacles include:

  • Computer hardware
  • Refrigerators
  • Freezers
  • Air conditioners
  • Clothes washers
  • Clothes dryers
  • Dishwashers
  • Kitchen food waste disposers
  • Information technology equipment
  • Sump pumps
  • Electrical aquarium equipment
  • Hand-held motor-operated tools
  • Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools
  • Light industrial motor-operated tools
  • Hedge clippers
  • Lawn mowers

    This list is not exhaustive. A qualified electrician should evaluate and install grounded receptacles as standard building practices.

    Photo 53  
     

    69)   One or more electric receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of a sink appear to have no ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of shock. A qualified electrician should evaluate to determine if GFCI protection exists, and if not, repairs should be made so that all receptacles that serve countertop surfaces within six feet of sinks have GFCI protection. For example, install GFCI receptacles or circuit breaker(s) as needed.
    70)   An insufficient number of smoke alarms are installed. Additional smoke alarms should be installed as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
    71)   One window extends to within 18 inches of the floor (landing to 2nd floor) and does not appear to be made of tempered glass. If the glass is not tempered, then this is a potential safety hazard. Typically a label is etched into the corner of tempered glass panes to indicate that they are tempered. The inspector was unable to find such labels. Recommend consulting with the property owner(s) and/or have a glass specialist evaluate to determine if glass is tempered and make repairs as necessary. If it cannot be determined that the glass is tempered, then a qualified contractor should either replace glass as necessary with tempered glass and as per standard building practices, or install protective devices as necessary, such as wooden bars.

    Photo 56  
     

    72)   Batteries in all the smoke alarms should be replaced after taking occupancy, and annually in the future. "Chirping" noises emitted from smoke alarms typically indicate that batteries need replacing. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html
    73)   One or more air supply registers are loose or installed in a substandard way (in sun room). Repairs should be made as necessary so registers are securely attached, flush with the surface they are installed on, and otherwise correctly installed.
    74)   One or more light fixtures (wall sconces) appear to be inoperable. Recommend further evaluation by replacing bulb(s) and/or consulting with the property owner(s). Repairs or replacement of the light fixture(s) by a qualified electrician may be necessary.
    75)   Stains were found in on the ceiling area (in sun room behind chimney). However, no elevated levels of moisture were found. The stain(s) may be due to past roof and/or plumbing leaks. As per realtor, owner informed that it is prior damage from the chimney, which was recently repointed/repaired. Recommend that a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair ceiling and wall as necessary.

    Photo 52  
     

     
    This report is the exclusive property of AT HOME INSPECTIONS, INC. and the client(s) listed in the report title.

    This inspection and report was completed by Debra Monte, NYS Lic. #16000040194, an InterNACHI member #0910302 in good standing.

    "GO GREEN - $AVE MONEY" Be sure to call the Green inspector from At Home Inspections after you purchase your home for an affordable environmental and energy efficiency assessment of your home to help you make your home greener, safer and healthier, while saving you money.