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4U Home, Inc. DBA 4U Home Inspection

Website: http://www.4uhomeinc.com
Email: 4uhomeinspection@gmail.com
Phone: (443) 472-0434
Inspector: Alan Grubb
Maryland Inspector License # 30963

 

Property Inspection Report
Client(s): Sample Client
Property address: 5555 Anywhere Drive
Central, MD 2100005
Inspection date: 12/31/2010
This report published on Wednesday, February 09, 2011 2:58:09 PM EST

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This report is the exclusive property of this inspection company and the client(s) listed in the report title. Use of this report by any unauthorized persons is prohibited.
This report is prepared under the Maryland Standard of Practices.
┬ęCopyright 2010 4U Home, Inc.
All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by an information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the owner of this copyright. Inquiries should be addressed to 4U Home, Inc., 8775 Cloudleap Court, Suite P57, Columbia, MD 21045.
Not responsible for typographical errors

 
How to Read this Report
This report is organized by the property's functional areas.  Within each functional area, descriptive information is listed first and is shown in bold type.  Items of concern follow descriptive information.
Concerns are shown and sorted according to these types:
Safety ConcernDenotes a condition that is UNSAFE and in need of PROMPT ATTENTION 
Significant IssuesA system or component that is considered significantly deficient, inoperable or unsafe by current building standards 
Repair/ReplaceIndicates the component will need repair or replacement now or in the near future 
Budget for ReplacementRepair likely within Five years and may involve a significant expense 
Repair/MaintainRecommend repair and/or maintenance 
EvaluateRecommend evaluation by a specialist 
MonitorRecommend monitoring in the future 
CommentFor your information 

Click here for a glossary of building construction terms.  Contact your inspector if there are terms that you do not understand, or visit the glossary of construction terms at http://www.reporthost.com/glossary.asp

Table of Contents
General information
Exterior
Roof
Garage
Attic
Electric service
Water heater
Heating and cooling
Plumbing and laundry
Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys
Basement
Kitchen
Bathrooms
Interior rooms

 
General information Return to table of contents
Report number: Sample1230100900
Inspector's name: Alan Grubb
Structures inspected: Residential
Type of building: Single family
Age of building: 8 Years
Time started: 08:30
Time finished: 12:00
Inspection Fee: Fair
Present during inspection: Client(s), Realtor(s)
Occupied: No
Weather conditions: Partly cloudy
Temperature: Cold 29F
Ground condition: Frozen
Front of structure faces: South
Main entrance faces: South
Foundation type: Unfinished basement
1) This property has one or more fuel burning appliances, and no carbon monoxide alarms are visible. This is a safety hazard. Recommend installing one or more carbon monoxide alarms as necessary and as per the manufacturer's instructions. For more information, visit http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml05/05017.html
 
Exterior Return to table of contents
Footing material: Poured in place concrete
Foundation material: Poured in place concrete
Apparent wall structure: Wood frame
Wall covering: Vinyl
Driveway material: Poured in place concrete
Sidewalk material: Poured in place concrete
Exterior door material: Solid core steel
2) Step is wobbly do to pulled nails. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary, such as screwing and gluing steps to prevent wobbling.

Photo 28  
 

3) Window well higher than three feet exist on this property and guardrails or barriers are missing or inadequate. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. At a minimum, the client(s) should be aware of this hazard, especially when children are present. Ideally a qualified contractor should install adequate guardrails or reinstall existing barriers to eliminate fall hazards.

Photo 16  

Photo 18  

4) One or more areas of the grounds around the structure have significantly soggy soil, standing water or indications of accumulated water at times (sediment, dead grass, etc.). Recommend consulting with a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage, to determine if or what repairs are needed to provide adequate drainage. Possible repairs may involve grading soil, or installing, repairing and/or replacing underground drains.

Photo 26  
 

5) One or more gutters are poorly sloped so that significant amounts of water accumulate in them rather than draining through the downspouts. This can cause gutters to overflow, especially when organic debris such as leaves or needles have accumulated in them. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as correcting the slope in gutters or installing additional downspouts and extensions if necessary.

Photo 2  
 

6) Siding is damaged and/or deteriorated in one or more areas. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs and/or replace siding as necessary to prevent water and vermin intrusion.

Photo 12  
 

7) Front deck area joist member has warped and twisted causing it to detach from sister joist. Appears that water from downspout has destabilized support post causing the twist. Joist needs replaced and recommend bolting together adhering to good building practices. Support post needs to be stabilized and water diverted from this area. Recommend a qualified contractor evaluate for repair and/or replacement.

Photo 5  
 

8) Gap between gutter and siding appears to be allowing water by pass gutter. This is evident by rot in trim board and moisture in corner area of wall. This appears to attributing to the moisture intrusion appearing on the basement joist. It is recommended that a qualified contractor evaluate for repair.

Photo 47  
Water intrusion area

Photo 48  
Wet area

9) Due to erosion the window well casing has pulled away from foundation wall. A qualified contractor should evaluate for repair and/or replacement. This evaluation should include the downspout extensions, which appear to be the root cause on the deterioration.

Photo 17  
 

10) One or more minor cracks (1/8 inch or less) were found in the foundation. These don't appear to be a structural concern, but recommend sealing them to prevent water infiltration and monitoring them in the future. Numerous products exist to seal such cracks including:
  • Hydraulic cement. Requires chiseling a channel in the crack to apply.
  • Resilient caulks (easy to apply).
  • Epoxy sealants (both a waterproof and structural repair).

    Photo 25  
     

    11) Minor cracks were found in the driveway. However they don't appear to be a structural concern and no trip hazards were found. No immediate action is recommended, but the client(s) may wish to have repairs made or have cracked sections replaced for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 21  
     

    12) One or more downspouts have no extensions, or have extensions that are ineffective. This can result in water accumulating around the structure's foundation, or in basements and crawl spaces if they exist. Accumulated water is a conducive condition to wood destroying insects and organisms, and may also cause the foundation to settle and possibly fail over time. Repairs should be made as necessary, such as installing or repositioning splash blocks, or installing and/or repairing tie-ins to underground drain lines, so rain water is carried at least several feet away from the structure to soil that slopes down and away from the structure.

    Photo 3  

    Photo 4  

    Photo 8  

    Photo 9  

    Photo 14  
    Serve wash out apparently causing water intrusion into basement

    Photo 20  
    Damage caused by errosion

    13) One or more wooden deck support posts are in contact with soil. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. However no damage from wood destroying insects or organisms was found. Standard building practices require that there be at least 6" of space between any wood and the soil below, even if the wood is treated. If possible, soil should be removed or graded so a 6" clearance is maintained. Otherwise recommend installing borate based Impel rods to prevent rot. For more information, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=impel+rods

    Photo 6  
     

    14) Rot was found in one or more areas on trim boards. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, replacing all rotten wood.

    Photo 46  
     

    15) Vegetation such as trees, shrubs and/or vines are in contact with or less than one foot from the structure's exterior. Vegetation can serve as a conduit for wood destroying insects and may retain moisture against the exterior after it rains. Vegetation should be pruned and/or removed as necessary to maintain a one foot clearance between it and the structure's exterior.

    Photo 7  
     

    16) Recommend cleaning deck(s) and treating with a preservative claiming to waterproof, block ultraviolet light, and stop mildew. Consumer Reports recommends these products:

  • Cabot Decking Stain and PTW Stain
  • Olympic Water Repellent Deck Stain
  • Thompson's House and Deck Stain
  • Wolman PTW Deck Stain
  • Akzo Sikkens Cetol DEK
  • Benjamin Moore Moorwood Clear Wood Finish
  • DAP Woodlife Premium
  • Olympic Natural Look Protector Plus

    Photo 23  
     

    17) Caulk is missing or deteriorated in some areas and should be replaced and/or applied where necessary. For more information on caulking, visit:
    The Ins and Outs of Caulking.

    Photo 24  
     

    18) The exterior finish in some areas is failing. A qualified contractor should prep (pressure wash, scrape, sand, prime caulk, etc.) and repaint or restain areas as needed and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 11  

    Photo 13  

    Photo 22  
     

    19) Stains were viewed in one or more areas on soffit panels. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future. If moisture is observed, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 27  
     

    20) Stains were found in one or more areas on soffit boards, but no elevated moisture levels were found and the wood appears to be in good condition. Based on the appearance of the roof, these stains may be from past leaks. Recommend monitoring these areas in the future. If moisture is observed, a qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.
     
    Roof Return to table of contents
    Roof inspection method: Viewed from eaves on ladder, Viewed from ground with binoculars
    Roof type: Cross gable
    Roof covering: Asphalt or fiberglass composition shingles
    Estimated age of roof: 8 years
    Gutter & downspout material: Aluminum
    Roof ventilation: Adequate
    21) Moss is growing on the rear porch roof. As a result, shingles may lift or be damaged. Leaks may result and/or the roof surface may fail prematurely. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms. Efforts should be taken to kill the moss during its growing season (wet months). Typically zinc-based chemicals are used for this, and must be applied periodically. For information on various moss treatment products and their pros and cons, visit:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=moss+on+roof

    Photo 15  
     

     
    Garage Return to table of contents

    22) The garage-house door isn't equipped with an automatic closing device such as sprung hinges. This door should close and latch automatically to prevent vehicle fumes from entering living spaces and/or to slow the spread of fire from the garage to living spaces. A qualified contractor should install automatic closing device(s) as necessary, and as per standard building practices, so this door closes and latches automatically.

    Photo 31  
     

    23) The garage vehicle door is damaged or deteriorated. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair or replace the door as necessary.

    Photo 29  
     

     
    Attic Return to table of contents
    Inspection method: Viewed from hatch
    Roof structure type: Trusses
    Ceiling structure: Trusses
    Insulation material: Cellulose loose fill
    24) Cover plate(s) are missing from one or more electric boxes, such as for receptacles, switches and/or junction boxes. They are intended to contain fire and prevent electric shock from exposed wires. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of fire and shock. Cover plates should be installed where missing.

    Photo 70  
     

    25) One or more exhaust fan ducts are broken and/or have fallen down, or somehow terminate in the attic. This is a conducive condition for wood destroying insects and organisms due to increased moisture levels in the attic from the exhaust air. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary and as per standard building practices, so all exhaust air is vented outside.

    Photo 68  

    Photo 69  

    26) No insulation is installed over the attic access hatch. Recommend installing insulation above hatch for better energy efficiency.
    27) No weatherstrip is installed around the attic access hatch. Weatherstrip should be installed around the hatch to prevent heated interior air from entering attic.
     
    Electric service Return to table of contents
    Primary service type: Underground
    Primary service overload protection type: Circuit breakers
    Service amperage (amps): 200
    Service voltage (volts): 120/240
    Location of main service switch: Kitchen Hallway Wall
    Location of main disconnect: Breaker at top of main service panel
    28) The main service panel cover couldn't be removed due to lack of access from shelving, cabinets, walls and/or ceilings. This panel wasn't fully evaluated. Repairs should be made so the panel cover can be easily removed.

    Photo 49  
     

     
    Water heater Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 8 Years
    Type: Tank
    Energy source: Electricity
    Manufacturer: Rheem
    Model: 81V52D-C Serial # RH0502B26181
    Water temperature (degrees Fahrenheit): 119 F
    29) Hot water heater appears to have failed. Water filled drip pan, corrosion and water where on tank below first heat element panel. When opened corrosion and water was dripping from element and had filled the plastic liner of tank. Do to shock hazard power was disengaged and upon texted approval from selling agent water supply was disengaged.

    Photo 57  
    Water in Drip Pan

    Photo 58  
    Insulation with water

    Photo 59  
    Visible Corrosion and accumulated water
     

     
    Heating and cooling Return to table of contents
    Estimated age: 8 Years
    Primary heating system energy source: Natural gas
    Primary heat system type: Forced air
    Primary A/C energy source: Electric
    Primary Air conditioning type: Split system
    Distribution system: Flexible ducts
    Manufacturer: Ducane
    Model: CMPE050U3 Serial # 2780450229 20537402
    Filter location: At the base of the furnace
    30) Moisture stains were observed on furnace. This appears to be a result of the condensation line not draining properly. Due to temperature unit could not be engaged to test. It is recommended that the client monitor this area when weather is warm enough to engage A/C unit check unit for proper drainage. If moisture is observed have a qualified HAVC contractor evaluate for repair.

    Photo 40  

    Photo 42  

    Photo 43  
     

    31) One or more air supply ducts are broken or disconnected. Increased moisture levels in unconditioned spaces and higher energy costs may result. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make permanent repairs as necessary.

    Photo 41  
     

    32) The outside condensing unit is not level. Damage may occur if it is more than ten degrees off from level. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary, such as replacing the pad that the condensing unit is installed on.

    Photo 19  
     

    33) Insulation for the outside condensing unit's refrigerant lines is damaged, deteriorated and/or missing in one or more areas. This may result in reduced efficiency and increased energy costs. A qualified heating and cooling contractor should replace insulation as necessary.

    Photo 30  
     

    34) The estimated useful life for air conditioning compressors is 8 to 15 years. This unit appears to be approaching this age and may need replacing at any time. Recommend budgeting for a replacement in the near future.
    35) Air handler filter(s) are dirty and should be replaced now. They should be checked monthly in the future and replaced as necessary.

    Photo 39  
     

    36) Air handler filter(s) should be checked monthly in the future and replaced or washed as necessary.

    Photo 38  
    FYI Location of filter
     

    37) The outdoor air temperature was below 60 degrees Fahrenheit during the inspection. Because of this, the inspector was unable to operate and fully evaluate the cooling system.
     
    Plumbing and laundry Return to table of contents
    Location of main water shut-off valve: East wall of basement
    Water service: Public
    Service pipe material: Polyethelene
    Supply pipe material: CPVC
    Vent pipe material: Plastic
    Drain pipe material: Plastic
    Waste pipe material: Plastic
    38) No ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection device is visible for the sump pump electric supply. A qualified electrician should determine if a GFCI protection device (receptacle or circuit breaker) exists for the sump pump and install one if missing to reduce the danger of electric shock.

    Photo 45  
     

    39) The clothes dryer is equipped with a vinyl or foil, accordion-type, flexible exhaust duct. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission considers these types of ducts to be unsafe, and a fire hazard. These types of ducts can trap lint and are susceptible to kinks or crushing, which can greatly reduce the air flow. This duct should be replaced with a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct, and by a qualified contractor if necessary. Most clothes dryer manufacturers specify the use of a rigid or corrugated semi-rigid metal duct. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/5022.html

    Photo 35  
     

    40) Washing machine leaks at supply line. A licensed plumber should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 37  
     

    41) The laundry sink is not anchored to the wall or floor. A qualified contractor should securely anchor the sink to the wall and/or floor to prevent damage to and leaks in the water supply and/or drain pipes due to the sink being moved.

    Photo 36  
     

    42) A sump pump is installed on the premises. This may indicate that water accumulates inside or below the structure. Recommend asking the property owners how often the sump pump operates and for how long at different times of the year. Also, the clients should be aware that the service life of most sump pumps is between five and seven years, and that the pump may need replacing soon depending on its age and how much it operates.
    43) The inspector was unable to test the sump pump do to sealed unit. The sump pump was not fully evaluated.
    44) FYI Location of water main shut-off, East wall of basement

    Photo 44  
     

     
    Fireplaces, woodstoves and chimneys Return to table of contents
    Fireplace type: Metal prefabricated
    Chimney type: Masonry
    45) Fireplace hearths are damaged and/or deteriorated with broken tiles. A qualified contractor should evaluate and make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 53  
     

    46) One or more gas fireplaces and/or stoves did not respond when the controls were operated. This may be due to the pilot light being turned off, the gas supply being turned off, or any number of other reasons. As a result, these appliances were not fully evaluated. As per the Standards of Practice for both the National Association of Certified Home Inspectors (NACHI) and the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) the inspector does not operate gas shut off valves or light pilot lights during inspections. Recommend consulting with the property owner(s) as to how the fireplace(s) and/or stove(s) operate, and/or having a gas appliance contractor evaluate and repair if necessary.

    Photo 52  
     

     
    Basement Return to table of contents
    Insulation material underneath floor above: Fiberglass roll or batt
    Pier or support post material: Wood, Steel
    Beam material: Steel
    Floor structure above: Solid wood joists
    47) Evidence of prior water intrusion was found in the window well area of the basement. The client(s) should review any disclosure statements available and ask the property owner(s) about past accumulation of water in the basement. The basement should be monitored in the future for accumulated water, especially after heavy and/or prolonged periods of rain. If water is found to accumulate, a qualified contractor who specializes in drainage issues should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 33  
     

    48) One or more areas of the basement joist structure appeared to be wet or had elevated levels of moisture at the time of the inspection. There appears to be an active leak in the roof or structure exterior. A qualified contractor should evaluate and repair as necessary.

    Photo 34  
     

     
    Kitchen Return to table of contents

    49) The dishwasher appears to be inoperable. The client(s) should ask the property owner(s) about this, and if necessary, the dishwasher should be replaced, or a qualified appliance technician should evaluate and repair.

    Photo 50  
     

    50) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.

    Photo 51  
     

     
    Bathrooms Return to table of contents

    51) The "flapper valve" in the hallway toilet did not reseat after flushing. Significant amounts of water can be lost through such leaks. A qualified plumber should evaluate and repair or replace components as necessary.

    Photo 61  

    Photo 62  

    52) The shower diverter valve for one or more bathtub faucets is defective. A significant amount of water comes out of the bathtub spout when the shower is turned on. Water will be wasted as a result. A qualified plumber should evaluate and replace components or make repairs as necessary.

    Photo 60  
     

    53) In master bath, whirlpool tub stopper would not engage, could not fully evaluate the Tub.

    Photo 65  
     

    54) Water supply handle on master bathtub is chipped. Client may want to have replaced for cosmetic reasons.

    Photo 63  
     

    55) Caulk is missing and/or deteriorated where countertops meet backsplashes in wet areas, such as around sinks. Caulk should be replaced where deteriorated and/or applied where missing to prevent water damage.

    Photo 55  

    Photo 64  

     
    Interior rooms Return to table of contents

    56) Guardrails are missing from back entrance that is a elevated surface with high drop-off. This is a safety hazard due to the risk of falling. Standard building practices require guardrails to be installed at drop-offs higher than 30 inches, but in some cases it is advised to install them at shorter drop-offs and to prevent egress from this area. A qualified contractor should evaluate and install guardrails or install steps in this area as necessary and as per standard building practices.

    Photo 10  
     

    57) One or more smoke alarms are damaged, deteriorated and/or missing from their mounting brackets. Damaged and/or missing smoke alarms should be replaced as necessary so a functioning one exists in each hallway leading to bedrooms, and in each bedroom. For more information, visit:
    http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/5077.html

    Photo 32  
     

    58) Deterioration, leaning and/or bowing were found in walls of stairwell. Due to the amount of bowing it is recommeded that the client have a qualified structural engineer evaluate to determine what repairs are necessary. Repairs should be made by a qualified contractor.

    Photo 56  
     

    59) Carpeting in one or more rooms is soiled and/or stained. Recommend having carpeting professionally cleaned as necessary.

    Photo 54  
     

    60) Minor cracks were found in ceilings in one or more areas. They do not appear to be a structural concern, but the client(s) may wish to repair these for aesthetic reasons.

    Photo 66  

    Photo 67  

     
    This report is prepared under the Maryland Standard of Practices.
    ┬ęCopyright 2010 4U Home, Inc.
    All rights reserved. No part of this material may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by an information storage and retrieval system without permission in writing from the owner of this copyright. Inquiries should be addressed to 4U Home, Inc., 8775 Cloudleap Court, Suite P57, Columbia, MD 21045.
    Not responsible for typographical errors